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C Compilers

steve_bank

Well-known member
Anybody using free c/c+ compilers?

I downloaded Visual Studio but it is way too complicated. I'm looking for something like the old Turbo C++ simple development environment.
 

Swammerdami

Squadron Leader
Staff member
gcc is the excellent compiler I'm familiar with. I don't use any development environment except 'vi', 'make' etc.

I think there's a version of gcc for Windows, though I run it under cygwin.
 

Jayjay

Well-known member
real_programmers.png


(For the record, I use nano.)
 

barbos

Well-known member
Nano for programming? OP question is really about IDE, not compilers or editors separately.
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
The old Borland C/C++ went away a few tears ago after being bought out. I was looking for something simple that probably does not exist anymore.

Simple to install and easy to figure out.

I installed Visual C++, there is a learning curve curve.

I vaguely remember Vi with no fondness.

Editors and the environment are part of compilers.

I associate it with DEC/Unix because the first company I worked at had a VAX. When a number of users were logged on and you started compiler you went and had a cup of coffee. And then the Unix clone Xenix when I went to work at Intel.

Vi is a legacy part of the Unix distribution. There must be tools for Unix and Linux the usual amenities like debuggers.

I'd hate to write working code beyond a limited size without a good debugger. Like tracing, source level debugging, single stepping.

That is what made Borland popular in the day.
 

J842P

Well-known member
The old Borland C/C++ went away a few tears ago after being bought out. I was looking for something simple that probably does not exist anymore.

Simple to install and easy to figure out.

I installed Visual C++, there is a learning curve curve.

I vaguely remember Vi with no fondness.

Editors and the environment are part of compilers.

I associate it with DEC/Unix because the first company I worked at had a VAX. When a number of users were logged on and you started compiler you went and had a cup of coffee. And then the Unix clone Xenix when I went to work at Intel.

Vi is a legacy part of the Unix distribution. There must be tools for Unix and Linux the usual amenities like debuggers.

I'd hate to write working code beyond a limited size without a good debugger. Like tracing, source level debugging, single stepping.

That is what made Borland popular in the day.

Well, the "niftiest" IDEs currently, I would say, are the JetBrains ones. I've used their Java and Python IDEs, here is there C/C++ IDE, CLion:

https://www.jetbrains.com/clion/

As for the compiler, I'm sure there are many resources online on how to setup one for your system -- are you using Windows?

In the *Nix world, usually people would choose between the Clang and GCC.
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
A few years back I did consulting work with a guy who had a software business and was getting into audio.

He used a package that took pseudo code script and created compiled C code for most every platform. His product was a math package tailored to banks and finance. Made a lot of money.

Adding, routine coding is going to fall prey to AI, IMO.
 

barbos

Well-known member
I only use free stuff. And I find kdevelop easy and sufficient. It does not work for java, though.
 

excreationist

Active member
When in the Linux command line (like Amazon Web Services) I prefer nano when editing a file.... when I learnt C at uni in about 1998 I used Telnet and GCC....

BTW besides Visual Studio IDE there is also VS Code.... it is quite bare-bones. I had to download it for a Python class. It's got code prediction/completion, etc. And coloured syntax...

https://code.visualstudio.com/
Free. Built on open source. Runs everywhere.

https://code.visualstudio.com/docs/supporting/faq
Visual Studio Code is a streamlined code editor with support for development operations like debugging, task running, and version control. It aims to provide just the tools a developer needs for a quick code-build-debug cycle and leaves more complex workflows to fuller featured IDEs, such as Visual Studio IDE
 

bigfield

the baby-eater
I use VS Code, which is extremely popular.

It has a very nice UI, and you can easily configure it to be a C IDE, including compiler, step debugger and Intellisense. You can also tweak the UI to make fonts larger or change the colour scheme to suit your eyesight.

I am very impressed with the speed that some programmers achieve by using keyboard-driven editors like vim and emacs, but I've never felt the need to learn that skill. My brain just doesn't think of code that quickly.
 

Cheerful Charlie

Well-known member
When in the Linux command line (like Amazon Web Services) I prefer nano when editing a file.... when I learnt C at uni in about 1998 I used Telnet and GCC....

BTW besides Visual Studio IDE there is also VS Code.... it is quite bare-bones. I had to download it for a Python class. It's got code prediction/completion, etc. And coloured syntax...

https://code.visualstudio.com/
Free. Built on open source. Runs everywhere.

https://code.visualstudio.com/docs/supporting/faq
Visual Studio Code is a streamlined code editor with support for development operations like debugging, task running, and version control. It aims to provide just the tools a developer needs for a quick code-build-debug cycle and leaves more complex workflows to fuller featured IDEs, such as Visual Studio IDE

Vi, Vim et al make me work to hard too want to use them. Nano is a little better. For quick and dirty editor try Nice Editor. NE. I spent a week trying to find a tutorial on how to configure Emacs to be readable and usable, and such basics and there was no easy such tutorial I could find. I gave up on that for that reason. NE is not an IDE, but for a simple editor, it is very nice and usable.
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
Visual Studio is good, a lot easier than I expected. I went around in circles for a while chasing errors until I realized I opened a C# project instead of C++.

Select 'release' after debugging from a menu, build and a .exe is produced. Could not be easier.

You can also do Visual Basic in the free community download.
 

Swammerdami

Squadron Leader
Staff member
Vi, Vim et al make me work to hard too want to use them....

Before using vi, my "editor" was to rearrange decks of Hollerith cards! Later I graduated to IEBUPDTE !! :)

Then I got a job that introduced me to C, Unix, etc. Co-workers were mostly Berkeleyites and the default .cshrc they gave us beginners had a line
. . . alias vi ed
:) But the old hands were happy to give short tutorials to us beginners, and I soon picked up enough to use vi effectively. There was zero conscious question on my part about which editor to use — I was just hacking out code ASAP (mostly not in C, but in a custom machine language for a custom processor).

This was over 40 years ago. By now, operating vi is like riding a bicycle: it's ingrained in my cerebellum. There may be some keystroke sequences I use regularly which, if you asked me, I'd hardly remember which keys! --: I'd have to watch where my fingers go!!
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
When I my first class in software class, FORAN, I'd keypunch the cards, drop the deck off at the school computer center, and come back later for a printout,.
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
MS Visual Studio is very good. A lot of effort creating useful features.

I have one problem. x^y does not work and I can not figure out why. pow(x,y) works fine.

I looked on the net and found 1 report of a similar problem.
 

Jayjay

Well-known member
MS Visual Studio is very good. A lot of effort creating useful features.

I have one problem. x^y does not work and I can not figure out why. pow(x,y) works fine.

I looked on the net and found 1 report of a similar problem.

There's no power operator in C/C++. x^y means bitwise XOR.
 

barbos

Well-known member
MS Visual Studio is very good. A lot of effort creating useful features.

I have one problem. x^y does not work and I can not figure out why. pow(x,y) works fine.

I looked on the net and found 1 report of a similar problem.

There's no power operator in C/C++. x^y means bitwise XOR.
Well, there is power operator for x=2 and y=[0,1,2,3,....] :D
2^x=1<<x
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
VS works fine, but...

After the trial period I was prompted to create a MS account to keep using it free. I did and used my throwaway email.

A few days later I was prompted to login and was told my account was locked for suspicious activity , to unlock I have to give them a phone number for a new password message, from which I assume they can get personal info from the number. Same story from others online.

I downloaded Eclipse and am trying it out.
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
VS stopped runni g todaty and I am locked out of the install directory but no worries.

Code Blocks is a better tool than Eclipse. It comes bundled with a compiler suite for FORTRAN, Python, and C/C++. A good tool if you want to learn C/C++ or if all you need is a console app. It will do everything I needed VS for, and it takes up a lot less room.

Eclipse appears to be an old tool. To zoom you have to use +- keys instead of the mouse.
 

J842P

Well-known member
VS stopped runni g todaty and I am locked out of the install directory but no worries.

Code Blocks is a better tool than Eclipse. It comes bundled with a compiler suite for FORTRAN, Python, and C/C++. A good tool if you want to learn C/C++ or if all you need is a console app. It will do everything I needed VS for, and it takes up a lot less room.

Eclipse appears to be an old tool. To zoom you have to use +- keys instead of the mouse.

Eh, I wouldn't necessarily conclude that a modern development tools is "old" if it prefers keyboard shortcuts to the mouse. The ideal for most software developers I know is to have a setup where you never touch the mouse. But yeah, Eclipse happens to be quite dated. If you are looking for an IDE for C, C++, I'd consider CLion from Intellij: https://www.jetbrains.com/clion/
 

steve_bank

Well-known member
VS stopped runni g todaty and I am locked out of the install directory but no worries.

Code Blocks is a better tool than Eclipse. It comes bundled with a compiler suite for FORTRAN, Python, and C/C++. A good tool if you want to learn C/C++ or if all you need is a console app. It will do everything I needed VS for, and it takes up a lot less room.

Eclipse appears to be an old tool. To zoom you have to use +- keys instead of the mouse.

Eh, I wouldn't necessarily conclude that a modern development tools is "old" if it prefers keyboard shortcuts to the mouse. The ideal for most software developers I know is to have a setup where you never touch the mouse. But yeah, Eclipse happens to be quite dated. If you are looking for an IDE for C, C++, I'd consider CLion from Intellij: https://www.jetbrains.com/clion/

There are over a dozen. I am not a developer. Haven't tried it, Code Blocks will import VS projects.
 
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