• Welcome to the new Internet Infidels Discussion Board, formerly Talk Freethought.

Cataract surgery

Elixir

Made in America
Joined
Sep 23, 2012
Messages
21,864
Location
Mountains
Basic Beliefs
English is complicated
Best med thing E V E R !!!

Had both eyes’ lenses replaced a few years ago. I was amazed. Suddenly able to see if a fly is cleaning itself from 30’ away - that’s one thing. But what Z said; the COLORS!!

Need readers for small print, but distance vision is perfect. Also zero cost (Medicare) is nice.
 

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
12,466
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
Best med thing E V E R !!!

Had both eyes’ lenses replaced a few years ago. I was amazed. Suddenly able to see if a fly is cleaning itself from 30’ away - that’s one thing. But what Z said; the COLORS!!

Need readers for small print, but distance vision is perfect. Also zero cost (Medicare) is nice.
Can you request a vision range? I'd rather sack a bit of distance for close-up but getting my lenses replaced is on my list of "technophile dreams".

I remember posting here 10+ years ago that this was going to happen 5 years ago or somesuch and being told "look at how far it is away, no way!!!"
 

Elixir

Made in America
Joined
Sep 23, 2012
Messages
21,864
Location
Mountains
Basic Beliefs
English is complicated
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
 

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
12,466
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
One for each would bother me too much. I'd much rather be able to be able to focus for a second and see the subpixels than watch a fly lick their crotch from across the room, but that's also because I do a bit of work that requires good close-up vision, including the occasional surface-mount component replacement, soldering shit in the .5-3mm range, which I do freehand like a dummy.

Honestly, keeping my hand steady enough is the bigger challenge.

I absolutely HATE wearing glasses for anything, and losing my reading range would piss me off to no end.

For those looking for more information, the actual procedure is IOL, "Intraocular lens replacement".

It took me a fair bit of Google foo to find this amid all the other lasic and implantable contact bullshit.

It's cheaper than implantable contacts, and honestly probably much better.

You also don't actually NEED to have cataracts to yeet your meat lenses.
 

Toni

Contributor
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
16,172
Location
NOT laying back and thinking of England
Basic Beliefs
Peace on Earth, goodwill towards all
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
One for each would bother me too much. I'd much rather be able to be able to focus for a second and see the subpixels than watch a fly lick their crotch from across the room, but that's also because I do a bit of work that requires good close-up vision, including the occasional surface-mount component replacement, soldering shit in the .5-3mm range, which I do freehand like a dummy.

Honestly, keeping my hand steady enough is the bigger challenge.

I absolutely HATE wearing glasses for anything, and losing my reading range would piss me off to no end.

For those looking for more information, the actual procedure is IOL, "Intraocular lens replacement".

It took me a fair bit of Google foo to find this amid all the other lasic and implantable contact bullshit.

It's cheaper than implantable contacts, and honestly probably much better.

You also don't actually NEED to have cataracts to yeet your meat lenses.
You can choose to be nearsighted if you like. My husband had always been nearsighted but when he had his cataract surgery, he chose to be far sighted and west readers.

The idea of having one eye nearsighted and the other farsighted seemed too weird to him but my understanding is that people adjust and don’t notice the difference. But does sound freaky.
 

Elixir

Made in America
Joined
Sep 23, 2012
Messages
21,864
Location
Mountains
Basic Beliefs
English is complicated
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
One for each would bother me too much. I'd much rather be able to be able to focus for a second and see the subpixels than watch a fly lick their crotch from across the room, but that's also because I do a bit of work that requires good close-up vision, including the occasional surface-mount component replacement, soldering shit in the .5-3mm range, which I do freehand like a dummy.

Honestly, keeping my hand steady enough is the bigger challenge.

I absolutely HATE wearing glasses for anything, and losing my reading range would piss me off to no end.

For those looking for more information, the actual procedure is IOL, "Intraocular lens replacement".

It took me a fair bit of Google foo to find this amid all the other lasic and implantable contact bullshit.

It's cheaper than implantable contacts, and honestly probably much better.

You also don't actually NEED to have cataracts to yeet your meat lenses.
You can choose to be nearsighted if you like. My husband had always been nearsighted but when he had his cataract surgery, he chose to be far sighted and west readers.

The idea of having one eye nearsighted and the other farsighted seemed too weird to him but my understanding is that people adjust and don’t notice the difference. But does sound freaky.
I didn't have cataracts; the doc described it as yellowing of the lens rather than clouding, but the effect must have been similar.
I elected for distance vision because I spend a lot of time outside watching birds, wildlife, working with and riding horses (VERY helpful on trail, to be able to read the ground before the horse steps on it), and appreciating the sky, which is spectacular around here. (I'll try to append this post with a pic I took while cleaning the barn evening before last...)
I have been pleasantly surprised to find that "distance" begins at about arm's length. I can read"normal" print pretty easily, but stuff like the ingredients lists (particularly on products that don't want you to read the ingredients list) makes me go for the glasses. I must have ten or so pairs in vehicles, by desks etc. that I got at the dollar store for $1 each. They suffice perfectly well for those situations. Also keep 3 pairs of $15 (w00 h00!!) of 'good' readers at my main desk, by the bed and in vehicle #1. But that's all.
So happy with the outcome, it's hard to express.
1661451448395.jpeg
^ doesn’t do it justice (snapshot, no filters)
 
Last edited:

thebeave

Veteran Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2001
Messages
3,639
Location
Silicon Valley, CA
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
I would like to someday have eyes that are good enough to read the tiny print directions on the label of a 1/2 pint size can of varnish. Sadly, all the CAUTION! and WARNING! labels reminding you not to drink it, on top of the Spanish language translation make that currently impossible. I don't think even the Six Million Dollar Man can read it with his bionic eye.
 

bleubird

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
1,365
Location
Alaska
Basic Beliefs
none
My sister had her's done 5 years ago. She wears half readers now. I may go that way. Will see eye doc in a month, after implants set.

I'am 20/20. Have been that good since I was 13!
 

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
12,466
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
One for each would bother me too much. I'd much rather be able to be able to focus for a second and see the subpixels than watch a fly lick their crotch from across the room, but that's also because I do a bit of work that requires good close-up vision, including the occasional surface-mount component replacement, soldering shit in the .5-3mm range, which I do freehand like a dummy.

Honestly, keeping my hand steady enough is the bigger challenge.

I absolutely HATE wearing glasses for anything, and losing my reading range would piss me off to no end.

For those looking for more information, the actual procedure is IOL, "Intraocular lens replacement".

It took me a fair bit of Google foo to find this amid all the other lasic and implantable contact bullshit.

It's cheaper than implantable contacts, and honestly probably much better.

You also don't actually NEED to have cataracts to yeet your meat lenses.
You can choose to be nearsighted if you like. My husband had always been nearsighted but when he had his cataract surgery, he chose to be far sighted and west readers.

The idea of having one eye nearsighted and the other farsighted seemed too weird to him but my understanding is that people adjust and don’t notice the difference. But does sound freaky.
Slightly nearsighted.

I'm unsure of how nearsighted I actually am, but it's pretty stark. I can start to perceive subpixels on my phone at normal distance if I focus on it and squint a bit.

As far as I am aware, the bionic lens replacements have a wider dynamic range of focal points than meat lenses due to their improved material properties, though, so even if it only got me to 20/23 at distance vision, it would be better than my 20/30+.

It's just losing any of that near end convenience that would bother me.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
7,033
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
I will probably need to have mine removed in the next year, but I love wearing glasses. Until my vision becomes blurred, the surgery can wait.

But, thanks for sharing your experience, bluebird. Do you still have to administer eye drops numerous times a day?
 

Toni

Contributor
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
16,172
Location
NOT laying back and thinking of England
Basic Beliefs
Peace on Earth, goodwill towards all
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
One for each would bother me too much. I'd much rather be able to be able to focus for a second and see the subpixels than watch a fly lick their crotch from across the room, but that's also because I do a bit of work that requires good close-up vision, including the occasional surface-mount component replacement, soldering shit in the .5-3mm range, which I do freehand like a dummy.

Honestly, keeping my hand steady enough is the bigger challenge.

I absolutely HATE wearing glasses for anything, and losing my reading range would piss me off to no end.

For those looking for more information, the actual procedure is IOL, "Intraocular lens replacement".

It took me a fair bit of Google foo to find this amid all the other lasic and implantable contact bullshit.

It's cheaper than implantable contacts, and honestly probably much better.

You also don't actually NEED to have cataracts to yeet your meat lenses.
You can choose to be nearsighted if you like. My husband had always been nearsighted but when he had his cataract surgery, he chose to be far sighted and west readers.

The idea of having one eye nearsighted and the other farsighted seemed too weird to him but my understanding is that people adjust and don’t notice the difference. But does sound freaky.
Slightly nearsighted.

I'm unsure of how nearsighted I actually am, but it's pretty stark. I can start to perceive subpixels on my phone at normal distance if I focus on it and squint a bit.

As far as I am aware, the bionic lens replacements have a wider dynamic range of focal points than meat lenses due to their improved material properties, though, so even if it only got me to 20/23 at distance vision, it would be better than my 20/30+.

It's just losing any of that near end convenience that would bother me.
Yes, I'd hate to give up any of my current range of vision. I am naturally farsighted which gets worse as one ages. Hubby used to be so nearsighted that he really couldn't see me well from across the table. It took me (and him) some time to get used to the no glasses version where, if I wanted him to read something I had to mention it first because otherwise he'd show up without his glasses and be even more farsighted than I am. Or was. I think I've passed him now or at least my astigmatism is making my visual acuity less than it was in my youth. I wear continuous lenses almost all the time because of the astigmatism and because I tend to read a lot of stuff in the course of running around. I would lose my glasses if I weren't wearing them and still manage it sometimes. But on a recent trip, I did spend some time without and...it was really nice to not have the things on my face.
 

Jimmy Higgins

Contributor
Joined
Feb 1, 2001
Messages
38,499
Basic Beliefs
Calvinistic Atheist
My Mom and my MIL both recently got theirs done, and they speak similarly and are extremely happy.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
Messages
33,126
Location
Frozen in Michigan
Gender
Old Fart
Basic Beliefs
Democratic Socialist Atheist
I still have to wear glasses due to astigmatism. I got my cataract lenses when I had employer provided health insurance and they didn't cover toric lenses. At $1500 a piece I couldn't afford them. My doctor was a pretty cool guy. He tried to get the company rep to donate a pair for me but the rep refused.
 

bleubird

Veteran Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
1,365
Location
Alaska
Basic Beliefs
none
I will probably need to have mine removed in the next year, but I love wearing glasses. Until my vision becomes blurred, the surgery can wait.

But, thanks for sharing your experience, bluebird. Do you still have to administer eye drops numerous times a day?
Yes. 4 times a day first Then 3 times a day and so on for 4 weeks.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 16, 2000
Messages
37,580
Location
Nevada
Gender
Yes
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
You can choose to be nearsighted if you like. My husband had always been nearsighted but when he had his cataract surgery, he chose to be far sighted and west readers.

The idea of having one eye nearsighted and the other farsighted seemed too weird to him but my understanding is that people adjust and don’t notice the difference. But does sound freaky.

Yup. My wife had it last year, she chose to be less nearsighted but glasses for distance. It definitely sneaks up--she had no idea she was 20:140 in that eye. And apparently it's been influencing her color vision for ages--she discovered the stove flame was blue after the surgery.
 

Toni

Contributor
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
16,172
Location
NOT laying back and thinking of England
Basic Beliefs
Peace on Earth, goodwill towards all
You can choose to be nearsighted if you like. My husband had always been nearsighted but when he had his cataract surgery, he chose to be far sighted and west readers.

The idea of having one eye nearsighted and the other farsighted seemed too weird to him but my understanding is that people adjust and don’t notice the difference. But does sound freaky.

Yup. My wife had it last year, she chose to be less nearsighted but glasses for distance. It definitely sneaks up--she had no idea she was 20:140 in that eye. And apparently it's been influencing her color vision for ages--she discovered the stove flame was blue after the surgery.
My husband still tends to see color more 'gray' than I do even after his surgery. Friends who had the surgery report a big difference in color (brighter, more vibrant) but he really didn't see much change. But was thrilled he could see without his glasses.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 16, 2000
Messages
37,580
Location
Nevada
Gender
Yes
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
You can choose to be nearsighted if you like. My husband had always been nearsighted but when he had his cataract surgery, he chose to be far sighted and west readers.

The idea of having one eye nearsighted and the other farsighted seemed too weird to him but my understanding is that people adjust and don’t notice the difference. But does sound freaky.

Yup. My wife had it last year, she chose to be less nearsighted but glasses for distance. It definitely sneaks up--she had no idea she was 20:140 in that eye. And apparently it's been influencing her color vision for ages--she discovered the stove flame was blue after the surgery.
My husband still tends to see color more 'gray' than I do even after his surgery. Friends who had the surgery report a big difference in color (brighter, more vibrant) but he really didn't see much change. But was thrilled he could see without his glasses.
Overall she hasn't said anything about colors being more vibrant, it's just she seems to have been missing the deep blues. She does see the world as brighter than it was.
 

Tharmas

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2001
Messages
1,641
Location
Texas
Basic Beliefs
Pantheist
I need to get cataract surgery according to my optamologist. The last time I saw him, a year and a half ago, he said it wasn't worth it to give me a new prescription, and whenever I got tired of squinting I should contact him for my surgery. But I am squeamish about my eyes, and I'm used to my vision being what it is. I still drive at night with no problem. My wife had the surgery a couple of years ago, and she's kind of "meh," but I do notice that she can read signs in the distance easier than I. A couple that are good friends both had the surgery. He is really enthusiastic about his, but she is like my wife - "meh." So I guess I'll get it done one day, but not immediately.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
7,033
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
I need to get cataract surgery according to my optamologist. The last time I saw him, a year and a half ago, he said it wasn't worth it to give me a new prescription, and whenever I got tired of squinting I should contact him for my surgery. But I am squeamish about my eyes, and I'm used to my vision being what it is. I still drive at night with no problem. My wife had the surgery a couple of years ago, and she's kind of "meh," but I do notice that she can read signs in the distance easier than I. A couple that are good friends both had the surgery. He is really enthusiastic about his, but she is like my wife - "meh." So I guess I'll get it done one day, but not immediately.
I can certainly relate to what you said. I've been told for at least 3 or 4 years that I'm on the verge of needing the surgery, but at the same time, the doctors have said that they can tweak my eye glass Rx. a bit to give me more time. The most recent one told me to look into surgery when my vision becomes blurry. It's not there yet. Unlike others, I'm fine with wearing glasses. I only buy the light weight plastic ones and I usually choose something that almost makes them seem like a fashion accessory. 😜 I don't even feel them on my face and sometimes I forget I'm wearing them.

And while I realize cataract surgery is one of the simplest ones, I did have a patient who had some complications and needed to have more procedures done. I don't remember the details, other than it was a lot of trouble for her and the staff. I'm squeamish about eyes, ears and throat too, and I hate administering eye drops. But, Mr. Sohy is really good at it, so I suppose he would help me with the eye drops when the time comes. Maybe if I wait long enough, I'll be ecstatic about having had the surgery done.
 

Copernicus

Industrial Grade Linguist
Joined
May 28, 2017
Messages
4,243
Location
Bellevue, WA
Basic Beliefs
Atheist humanist
I had mine done a few weeks ago, and I'm not looking back. My vision is clear again and colors restored. I mostly don't wear glasses around the house, but my vision is now 20/20 when I do and even better for reading. Before the surgery, I found it hard to drive at night because of glare from oncoming headlights. Signs were difficult to read during the day even with glasses. I was using larger fonts and boldface when reading a computer or cell screen. All of that is unnecessary now. I see things more clearly now. And the lenses provide UV protection, too.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
7,033
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
I had mine done a few weeks ago, and I'm not looking back. My vision is clear again and colors restored. I mostly don't wear glasses around the house, but my vision is now 20/20 when I do and even better for reading. Before the surgery, I found it hard to drive at night because of glare from oncoming headlights. Signs were difficult to read during the day even with glasses. I was using larger fonts and boldface when reading a computer or cell screen. All of that is unnecessary now. I see things more clearly now. And the lenses provide UV protection, too.
Based on your experience, I still have more time. I haven't been able to drive at night for over a decade, due to glare, but I can still see signs and I don't use a large font when I'm reading. Maybe by next year, it will be time for me to have it done.
 

Copernicus

Industrial Grade Linguist
Joined
May 28, 2017
Messages
4,243
Location
Bellevue, WA
Basic Beliefs
Atheist humanist
I had mine done a few weeks ago, and I'm not looking back. My vision is clear again and colors restored. I mostly don't wear glasses around the house, but my vision is now 20/20 when I do and even better for reading. Before the surgery, I found it hard to drive at night because of glare from oncoming headlights. Signs were difficult to read during the day even with glasses. I was using larger fonts and boldface when reading a computer or cell screen. All of that is unnecessary now. I see things more clearly now. And the lenses provide UV protection, too.
Based on your experience, I still have more time. I haven't been able to drive at night for over a decade, due to glare, but I can still see signs and I don't use a large font when I'm reading. Maybe by next year, it will be time for me to have it done.

The surgery itself is much less difficult than people imagine. It doesn't take more than 15-30 minutes in an ambulatory clinic, and there is about a 2 week wait between surgery for the first and second eye. Mostly you have to use a lot of antibiotic and steroid drops just before the surgery and then for a few weeks afterward. The difference in sight before and after the surgery is remarkable.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
7,033
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
I had mine done a few weeks ago, and I'm not looking back. My vision is clear again and colors restored. I mostly don't wear glasses around the house, but my vision is now 20/20 when I do and even better for reading. Before the surgery, I found it hard to drive at night because of glare from oncoming headlights. Signs were difficult to read during the day even with glasses. I was using larger fonts and boldface when reading a computer or cell screen. All of that is unnecessary now. I see things more clearly now. And the lenses provide UV protection, too.
Based on your experience, I still have more time. I haven't been able to drive at night for over a decade, due to glare, but I can still see signs and I don't use a large font when I'm reading. Maybe by next year, it will be time for me to have it done.

The surgery itself is much less difficult than people imagine. It doesn't take more than 15-30 minutes in an ambulatory clinic, and there is about a 2 week wait between surgery for the first and second eye. Mostly you have to use a lot of antibiotic and steroid drops just before the surgery and then for a few weeks afterward. The difference in sight before and after the surgery is remarkable.
It's mostly the eye drops that will drive me crazy, plus I hate having to deal with even the easiest medical procedure. It's just me.I'm glad that the rest of you have had your cataracts removed and are pleased with the results.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 16, 2000
Messages
37,580
Location
Nevada
Gender
Yes
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
It's mostly the eye drops that will drive me crazy, plus I hate having to deal with even the easiest medical procedure. It's just me.I'm glad that the rest of you have had your cataracts removed and are pleased with the results.
My wife only had the one done that was seriously degrading her vision. The doc absolutely couldn't believe she wasn't going to do the other one (there's a cataract there that must be messing with colors a bit but it's not degrading her vision) and couldn't believe she could function with the difference between the two eyes. (Reality: She ended up going to a different eye doctor and actually got a script--a bit of double vision but everything was fine within 15 minutes.)
 

laughing dog

Contributor
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
21,997
Location
Minnesota
Gender
IT
Basic Beliefs
Dogs rule
Cataract surgery is amazing. My patch came off in 24 hours and my eyesight was spectacular. I had my eyes done about 8 years ago, and I love feeling the rain and wind on all of my face.

I had no problems with either eye. I kept to the drop regimen.

I'd heartily recommend the surgery if it is called for.
 

spikepipsqueak

My Brane Hertz
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
4,504
Location
Victoria
Basic Beliefs
Nil
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
One for each would bother me too much. I'd much rather be able to be able to focus for a second and see the subpixels than watch a fly lick their crotch from across the room, but that's also because I do a bit of work that requires good close-up vision, including the occasional surface-mount component replacement, soldering shit in the .5-3mm range, which I do freehand like a dummy.

Honestly, keeping my hand steady enough is the bigger challenge.

I absolutely HATE wearing glasses for anything, and losing my reading range would piss me off to no end.

For those looking for more information, the actual procedure is IOL, "Intraocular lens replacement".

It took me a fair bit of Google foo to find this amid all the other lasic and implantable contact bullshit.

It's cheaper than implantable contacts, and honestly probably much better.

You also don't actually NEED to have cataracts to yeet your meat lenses.
I had mine done about 7 years ago.

No cataracts, my eyes were OK, but I had hated wearing glasses for more than 40 years and decided to do something about it.

I set the surgeon the impossible task, saying I wanted to both read and drive without glasses. He found me an experimental lens and I am very happy with the results. I would have been OK with the "different eyes" option (it has worked for friends) but he didn't suggest it.
 

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
12,466
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
They should give you choices. You can get one eye tuned for distance and the other for closeup if you so desire.
The main thing is the CLARITY. I had no idea how blind I was. It was apparent that driving at night was becoming a no-go, but the loss of vision was so gradual that it was a total shock when it all cleared up.
Also - totally painless, rapid recovery (eyepatch at night, no heavy lifting for a few days...). All in all it's amazing.
One for each would bother me too much. I'd much rather be able to be able to focus for a second and see the subpixels than watch a fly lick their crotch from across the room, but that's also because I do a bit of work that requires good close-up vision, including the occasional surface-mount component replacement, soldering shit in the .5-3mm range, which I do freehand like a dummy.

Honestly, keeping my hand steady enough is the bigger challenge.

I absolutely HATE wearing glasses for anything, and losing my reading range would piss me off to no end.

For those looking for more information, the actual procedure is IOL, "Intraocular lens replacement".

It took me a fair bit of Google foo to find this amid all the other lasic and implantable contact bullshit.

It's cheaper than implantable contacts, and honestly probably much better.

You also don't actually NEED to have cataracts to yeet your meat lenses.
I had mine done about 7 years ago.

No cataracts, my eyes were OK, but I had hated wearing glasses for more than 40 years and decided to do something about it.

I set the surgeon the impossible task, saying I wanted to both read and drive without glasses. He found me an experimental lens and I am very happy with the results. I would have been OK with the "different eyes" option (it has worked for friends) but he didn't suggest it.
You'll need to DM me the details about the lens option you went with so I can sniff out where to get a pair, when I get mine done.

As it is, I'm not even sure whether I would want my astigmatism corrected. I would want to be able to select my preferred area densities. I don't like having what I'm looking at "fish-eyed".

I prefer to have the center of my vision look more like the inverse of a fisheye lens, so I see more densely on the edges, and my glasses, when they correct, give more "fish eye" effect, crowding out the periphery. I might even reduce my center field even more, were that an option I could get glasses to test.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
7,033
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
Cataract surgery is amazing. My patch came off in 24 hours and my eyesight was spectacular. I had my eyes done about 8 years ago, and I love feeling the rain and wind on all of my face.

I had no problems with either eye. I kept to the drop regimen.

I'd heartily recommend the surgery if it is called for.
I agree and I'll have it done eventually, assuming I don't die before I'm ready. I just don't have any blurred vision now, so it can wait a bit longer before I have it done.
 

Toni

Contributor
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
16,172
Location
NOT laying back and thinking of England
Basic Beliefs
Peace on Earth, goodwill towards all
Cataract surgery is amazing. My patch came off in 24 hours and my eyesight was spectacular. I had my eyes done about 8 years ago, and I love feeling the rain and wind on all of my face.

I had no problems with either eye. I kept to the drop regimen.

I'd heartily recommend the surgery if it is called for.
I agree and I'll have it done eventually, assuming I don't die before I'm ready. I just don't have any blurred vision now, so it can wait a bit longer before I have it done.
I understand completely. One thing that you might factor in: we tend to heal better when we are younger and less well as we get older.
 

Elixir

Made in America
Joined
Sep 23, 2012
Messages
21,864
Location
Mountains
Basic Beliefs
English is complicated
I'll have it done eventually, assuming I don't die before I'm ready.
Just my $.02

You don’t know how ready you are. If you have it done this afternoon, by tomorrow afternoon you will be kicking yourself for not doing it sooner.
DO IT.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
7,033
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
I'll have it done eventually, assuming I don't die before I'm ready.
Just my $.02

You don’t know how ready you are. If you have it done this afternoon, by tomorrow afternoon you will be kicking yourself for not doing it sooner.
DO IT.
Nope. I'll do it when I feel like I'm ready. I'm dealing with other issues right now that need to be addressed. But, thanks for caring.

Mr. Sohy just had a retina tear sewed up this morning. It was very painful but a retina tear is far more scary than putting off cataract surgery for awhile. Why fix something that's not broken yet? I don't even know which ophthalmologist to use.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 16, 2000
Messages
37,580
Location
Nevada
Gender
Yes
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
I understand completely. One thing that you might factor in: we tend to heal better when we are younger and less well as we get older.
This. If there's no question a surgery is going to be needed and it's a permanent type thing then I would want to do it as young as possible. (The permanent thing is about surgeries like joint replacement--the replacements eventually wear out and thus it's not really permanent. Thus you put that off as long as you can.)
 

laughing dog

Contributor
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
21,997
Location
Minnesota
Gender
IT
Basic Beliefs
Dogs rule
I'll have it done eventually, assuming I don't die before I'm ready.
Just my $.02

You don’t know how ready you are. If you have it done this afternoon, by tomorrow afternoon you will be kicking yourself for not doing it sooner.
DO IT.
Nope. I'll do it when I feel like I'm ready. I'm dealing with other issues right now that need to be addressed. But, thanks for caring.

Mr. Sohy just had a retina tear sewed up this morning. It was very painful but a retina tear is far more scary than putting off cataract surgery for awhile. Why fix something that's not broken yet? I don't even know which ophthalmologist to use.
I had a retina tear and detach - that is very scary. You and the Mr have my sympathies.

When the time is right for you, your opthalmologist can recommend a good opthalmological surgeon.
 

Marvin Edwards

Veteran Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2021
Messages
1,389
Location
Virginia
Basic Beliefs
Humanist
Yes, and it worked out well. The interesting thing is when you've had one eye done and still waiting on the other. You can close one eye and then the other and really see the difference. It is very much like those yellow sunglasses that block blue rays. The eye that's been treated sees without the yellow, the one that hasn't still sees the yellow. It's really cool.
 

steve_bank

Diabetic retinopathy and poor eyesight. Typos ...
Joined
Nov 10, 2017
Messages
11,165
Location
seattle
Basic Beliefs
secular-skeptic
I had both eyes done. It is a routine high volume procedure.

I did have some side effects. Now I have X Ray vision.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
7,033
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
As soon as I figure out a couple of other possible health problems, like why am I losing so much weight, I will schedule the surgery. I'm thinking hopefully it will be less than a year away. I might have figured out the weight loss problem, as I'm finally gaining a couple of pounds back. People mostly worry about gaining weight, but losing is just as bad, if not scarier. It can be an early symptom of cancer or some awful malabsorption disease. I'm hoping in my case, it's just the IBS-D and my high metabolism due to exercise. My dog's vet has the same problem and she's been drinking Ensure to help. I'm not that desperate yet. Anyway.....I'm off topic. Sorry about that. I know I need to have my eyes done before too long. I've just had a lot of other issues to deal with lately that are more important, but I do appreciate all the positive input about other's experiences.
 

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
12,466
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
As soon as I figure out a couple of other possible health problems, like why am I losing so much weight, I will schedule the surgery. I'm thinking hopefully it will be less than a year away. I might have figured out the weight loss problem, as I'm finally gaining a couple of pounds back. People mostly worry about gaining weight, but losing is just as bad, if not scarier. It can be an early symptom of cancer or some awful malabsorption disease. I'm hoping in my case, it's just the IBS-D and my high metabolism due to exercise. My dog's vet has the same problem and she's been drinking Ensure to help. I'm not that desperate yet. Anyway.....I'm off topic. Sorry about that. I know I need to have my eyes done before too long. I've just had a lot of other issues to deal with lately that are more important, but I do appreciate all the positive input about other's experiences.
Losing weight is terrifying. 100%
 
Top Bottom