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God as Universal Mind

Marvin Edwards

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One of the books I read as a kid was "There is a River", the story of Edgar Cayce. Cayce was a telepath who could, theory goes, place a book under his pillow at night and know the contents in the morning. He read people's illnesses and could direct them to a cure, which often was found in a book in the library. I was into this stuff also from "Hidden Channels of the Mind" by J. B. Rhine's wife Louisa. And, I can't say that I've read much Karl Jung, but he had a book about "The Collective Unconscious".

From these three sources it occurred to me that one version of God might be the collective unconscious minds of the human race, working as one, sort of like a computer farm, a distributed computing network. It would work behind the scenes, perhaps only accessed while we slept.

Just another crazy idea, I guess.
 

steve_bank

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Are you an Edgar Cayce believer?

In the 70s one of my sisters started to get sucked into it and I manged to talk her out o f it.

What I got from Indian traditions was god as a level of awareness and experience. In Abra mic traditions one experiences the presence of god. On a long flight a man next to me took out a wooden block with symbls on it, tied to his fprehead, and covered his head with a black cloth. When he finished I asked him what he did. He was Jewish and said he communed with god.

As a kid I read the tories by T Lobsang Rampa about a kid grwing up as a Tibetan monk. It was not until the 80s I learned he was an outright fraud. He was in a tree, fell and hit his head, and starteded to say he was the reincarnation of a Tibetan monk sent to bring it to the west. I believe he still has a following today. Like Edgar Cayce.

Lobsang Rampa is the pen name of an author who wrote books with paranormal and occult themes. His best known work is The Third Eye, published in Britain in 1956.

Following the publication of the book, newspapers reported that Rampa was Cyril Henry Hoskin (8 April 1910 – 25 January 1981), a plumber from Plympton in Devon who claimed that his body hosted the spirit of a Tibetan lama going by the name of Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, who is purported to have authored the books. The name Tuesday relates to a claim in The Third Eye that Tibetans are named after the day of the week on which they were born.

Tibetan Buddhism is filled with the paranormal. A Tibetan saint Milarepa was said to fly-levitate through the air as an arrow. Telepathy.

I'd say god is whatever you define it to be. Hinduism in all its variations defines it in a number of ways.


A blast from the past. Many concepts are derived and adapted from Hinduism.


In the religion of theosophy and the philosophical school called anthroposophy, the Akashic records are a compendium of all universal events, thoughts, words, emotions and intent ever to have occurred in the past, present, or future in terms of all entities and life forms, not just human. They are believed by theosophists to be encoded in a non-physical plane of existence known as the mental plane. There are anecdotal accounts but there is no scientific evidence for the existence of the Akashic records.[1][2][3]

Akasha (ākāśa आकाश) is the Sanskrit word for "aether", "sky", or "atmosphere".[4]

Theosophical Society​

The Sanskrit term akasha was introduced to the language of theosophy through H. P. Blavatsky (1831–1891), who characterized it as a sort of life force; she also referred to "indestructible tablets of the astral light" recording both the past and future of human thought and action, but she did not use the term "akashic".[5] The notion of an akashic record was further disseminated by Alfred Percy Sinnett in his book Esoteric Buddhism (1883) when he cites Henry Steel Olcott's A Buddhist Catechism (1881).[6] Olcott wrote that "Buddha taught two things are eternal, viz, 'Akasa' and 'Nirvana': everything has come out of Akasa in obedience to a law of motion inherent in it, and, passes away. No thing ever comes out of nothing." Olcott further explains that "Early Buddhism, then, clearly held to a permanency of records in the Akasa and the potential capacity of man to read the same, when he was evoluted to the stage of true individual enlightenment."[7]

By C. W. Leadbeater's Clairvoyance (1899) the association of the term with the idea was complete, and he identified the akashic records by name as something a clairvoyant could read.[5] In his 1913 Man: Whence, How and Whither, Leadbeater claims to record the history of Atlantis and other civilizations as well as the future society of Earth in the 28th century.[5][8]

Alice A. Bailey wrote in her book Light of the Soul on The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali – Book 3 – Union achieved and its Results (1927):


The akashic record is like an immense photographic film, registering all the desires and earth experiences of our planet. Those who perceive it will see pictured thereon: The life experiences of every human being since time began, the reactions to experience of the entire animal kingdom, the aggregation of the thought-forms of a karmic nature (based on desire) of every human unit throughout time. Herein lies the great deception of the records. Only a trained occultist can distinguish between actual experience and those astral pictures created by imagination and keen desire.

Rudolf Steiner​

The Austrian theosophist, and later founder of Anthroposophy, Rudolf Steiner used the Akashic records concept mainly in a series of articles in his journal Lucifer-Gnosis from 1904 to 1908, where he wrote about Atlantis and Lemuria, topics related to their purported history and civilization.[9] Besides this, he used the term in the title of lectures on a Fifth Gospel held in 1913 and 1914, shortly after the foundation of the Anthroposophical Society and Steiner's exclusion from the Theosophical Society Adyar.[10]
 

Marvin Edwards

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Are you an Edgar Cayce believer?

In the 70s one of my sisters started to get sucked into it and I manged to talk her out o f it.

What I got from Indian traditions was god as a level of awareness and experience. In Abra mic traditions one experiences the presence of god. On a long flight a man next to me took out a wooden block with symbls on it, tied to his fprehead, and covered his head with a black cloth. When he finished I asked him what he did. He was Jewish and said he communed with god.

As a kid I read the tories by T Lobsang Rampa about a kid grwing up as a Tibetan monk. It was not until the 80s I learned he was an outright fraud. He was in a tree, fell and hit his head, and starteded to say he was the reincarnation of a Tibetan monk sent to bring it to the west. I believe he still has a following today. Like Edgar Cayce.

Lobsang Rampa is the pen name of an author who wrote books with paranormal and occult themes. His best known work is The Third Eye, published in Britain in 1956.

Following the publication of the book, newspapers reported that Rampa was Cyril Henry Hoskin (8 April 1910 – 25 January 1981), a plumber from Plympton in Devon who claimed that his body hosted the spirit of a Tibetan lama going by the name of Tuesday Lobsang Rampa, who is purported to have authored the books. The name Tuesday relates to a claim in The Third Eye that Tibetans are named after the day of the week on which they were born.

Tibetan Buddhism is filled with the paranormal. A Tibetan saint Milarepa was said to fly-levitate through the air as an arrow. Telepathy.

I'd say god is whatever you define it to be. Hinduism in all its variations defines it in a number of ways.


A blast from the past. Many concepts are derived and adapted from Hinduism.


In the religion of theosophy and the philosophical school called anthroposophy, the Akashic records are a compendium of all universal events, thoughts, words, emotions and intent ever to have occurred in the past, present, or future in terms of all entities and life forms, not just human. They are believed by theosophists to be encoded in a non-physical plane of existence known as the mental plane. There are anecdotal accounts but there is no scientific evidence for the existence of the Akashic records.[1][2][3]

Akasha (ākāśa आकाश) is the Sanskrit word for "aether", "sky", or "atmosphere".[4]

Theosophical Society​

The Sanskrit term akasha was introduced to the language of theosophy through H. P. Blavatsky (1831–1891), who characterized it as a sort of life force; she also referred to "indestructible tablets of the astral light" recording both the past and future of human thought and action, but she did not use the term "akashic".[5] The notion of an akashic record was further disseminated by Alfred Percy Sinnett in his book Esoteric Buddhism (1883) when he cites Henry Steel Olcott's A Buddhist Catechism (1881).[6] Olcott wrote that "Buddha taught two things are eternal, viz, 'Akasa' and 'Nirvana': everything has come out of Akasa in obedience to a law of motion inherent in it, and, passes away. No thing ever comes out of nothing." Olcott further explains that "Early Buddhism, then, clearly held to a permanency of records in the Akasa and the potential capacity of man to read the same, when he was evoluted to the stage of true individual enlightenment."[7]

By C. W. Leadbeater's Clairvoyance (1899) the association of the term with the idea was complete, and he identified the akashic records by name as something a clairvoyant could read.[5] In his 1913 Man: Whence, How and Whither, Leadbeater claims to record the history of Atlantis and other civilizations as well as the future society of Earth in the 28th century.[5][8]

Alice A. Bailey wrote in her book Light of the Soul on The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali – Book 3 – Union achieved and its Results (1927):


The akashic record is like an immense photographic film, registering all the desires and earth experiences of our planet. Those who perceive it will see pictured thereon: The life experiences of every human being since time began, the reactions to experience of the entire animal kingdom, the aggregation of the thought-forms of a karmic nature (based on desire) of every human unit throughout time. Herein lies the great deception of the records. Only a trained occultist can distinguish between actual experience and those astral pictures created by imagination and keen desire.

Rudolf Steiner​

The Austrian theosophist, and later founder of Anthroposophy, Rudolf Steiner used the Akashic records concept mainly in a series of articles in his journal Lucifer-Gnosis from 1904 to 1908, where he wrote about Atlantis and Lemuria, topics related to their purported history and civilization.[9] Besides this, he used the term in the title of lectures on a Fifth Gospel held in 1913 and 1914, shortly after the foundation of the Anthroposophical Society and Steiner's exclusion from the Theosophical Society Adyar.[10]
I did a book report on "The Third Eye" when I was in 7th grade. My teacher, Mrs. Vaughn, said it wasn't a real autobiography (which was the assignment) and my response was "Says who?". After all, I had found it in the autobiography section of the public library.

And, of course, I got swept up in the pop culture of reincarnation through "The Search for Bridey Murphy". Only later to find it was the hypnotist getting caught up in his subject's delusion when doing age regression. The subject was simply trying to follow the hypnotist's suggestion of going back in time to an earlier point in their life, and ended up imagining an earlier life.

That stuff is mostly behind me now. Still, its fun to wonder. I'm still fond of time travel movies even though it is a physical impossibility.
 

SigmatheZeta

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Generally, I am rooted in both ancient Epicurean and ancient Pyrrhonist sentiments, although I am somewhat sympathetic toward the intentions behind ancient Cynicism.
In the sense of a "mind" needing to be like something with amygdala to give us heated emotions, an anterior cingulate cortex to counsel us toward tolerance and reason, a neocortex to give order to our behavior, a temporal lobe to give us knowledge, a hippocampus to make sure we learn and remember, and so on?

Anthropocentrism is ludicrous nonsense. There is nothing wrong with the human mind, to assume that the laws of nature must be governed by something like it, only because we are human, is folly.

The universe can be thought of as having order and a general sense of intention but only as a consequence of its nature. It is far more grand than any human mind, but that makes it all the more preposterous to project human motives onto it.
 
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rousseau

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I don't know about bringing 'Mind' into it, but over time both Buddhism and Hinduism landed on the concept of a 'Supreme' reality beyond the world of every-day perception. That doesn't sound like exactly what you're describing, but it's close.

There's a free version of the book I Am That somewhere online that describes this from the perspective of Advaita Vedanta. A bit repetitive, but very good.

I tend to agree with this description. Essentially there is objective reality, and then there is everyday perception which most of us get caught up in, while missing the ulterior reality.
 
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We are a singularity consciousness creating our universe
One of the books I read as a kid was "There is a River", the story of Edgar Cayce. Cayce was a telepath who could, theory goes, place a book under his pillow at night and know the contents in the morning. He read people's illnesses and could direct them to a cure, which often was found in a book in the library. I was into this stuff also from "Hidden Channels of the Mind" by J. B. Rhine's wife Louisa. And, I can't say that I've read much Karl Jung, but he had a book about "The Collective Unconscious".

From these three sources it occurred to me that one version of God might be the collective unconscious minds of the human race, working as one, sort of like a computer farm, a distributed computing network. It would work behind the scenes, perhaps only accessed while we slept.

Just another crazy idea, I guess.
Crazy? Truth is stranger than fiction. Yes we are god the singularity consciousness (1) vibrating in a universe of nothingness (0) 1000111000 you might recognize the binary system our universe uses to create and communicate its existence.
Hi . I have been researching for many years and I believe I have the answers for you.
What who when how and why we exist.
I will try a short summary of my conclusions.
1.deconstruction… flesh>atoms>subatomic particles >
Subatomic electromagnetic energy waves > consciousness…..
2. Physical is just a perception of vibrating energy.
10011100011 angstroms decibels firing synapses > all just subatomic electromagnetic energy waves.
We are a singularity that is creating our consciousness by vibrating.
I think therefore I am.. everything is a product of our thinking.
There is more such as the past is over doesn’t exist anymore > the future doesn’t exist yet.
Only now ever exists.. now after now .. we are an ever expanding singularity consciousness.
Energy cannot be created or destroyed so the purpose of the universe is to make our existence as a singularity (1) in a universe of nothingness (0) 1100011100
A more enjoyable experience…. Eternity is a long time to be lonely and bored.
 
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We are a singularity consciousness creating our universe
We are often disturbed by that which is different than our education.reading claims religious or scientific need to be supported by evidence logic and reason.. when it comes to our consciousness… there is no physical evidence to base our “reasoning” on.
God is a spirit and must be worshipped in spirit and in truth… neither of which is a physical property.
 

Keith&Co.

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We are often disturbed by that which is different than our education.reading claims religious or scientific need to be supported by evidence logic and reason.. when it comes to our consciousness… there is no physical evidence to base our “reasoning” on.
God is a spirit and must be worshipped in spirit and in truth… neither of which is a physical property.
Prolix. Just say 'Science can't prove gods.'


We knew that.
 

steve_bank

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We are often disturbed by that which is different than our education.reading claims religious or scientific need to be supported by evidence logic and reason.. when it comes to our consciousness… there is no physical evidence to base our “reasoning” on.
God is a spirit and must be worshipped in spirit and in truth… neither of which is a physical property.
Oh please!!!

I don't think we atheists here are disturbed by r relgion. The issues we face as non believers in this country due to religion are very real. If Christianity was no so bent and aggressive on converting all to the faith and constantly trying to force religion into the pbluc soace like schools none of us would care.

Reasoning and perceptions are functions of the brain. There is no evidence to the contrary. The human capacity for rationalization and self delusion is near infinite.

I believe there is a spirit in Mt Rainier and it speaks to me. How is that different than Yahweh? Both are 'spiritual' beliefs. Twice a day I kneel towards the mountain and pray.
 

T.G.G. Moogly

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Isn't it obvious that whenever a believer talks about "god" they are just talking about themselves? They've just made themselves into a god, imagined themselves as a superhero. They know what god wants and what god does and why god does it and what god thinks about things and how god is interested in them and on and on. Their god is just their superego. Every time they say "god" they are saying "me."
 

bleubird

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I don't know,I find all the talk about a god or gods boring.I was raised RCC. Got over it in my early 20;s.I have read a far amount books on mythology,and that is all religion is,human myth.
 

Marvin Edwards

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We are often disturbed by that which is different than our education.reading claims religious or scientific need to be supported by evidence logic and reason.. when it comes to our consciousness… there is no physical evidence to base our “reasoning” on.
God is a spirit and must be worshipped in spirit and in truth… neither of which is a physical property.
Oh please!!!

I don't think we atheists here are disturbed by r relgion. The issues we face as non believers in this country due to religion are very real. If Christianity was no so bent and aggressive on converting all to the faith and constantly trying to force religion into the pbluc soace like schools none of us would care.

Reasoning and perceptions are functions of the brain. There is no evidence to the contrary. The human capacity for rationalization and self delusion is near infinite.

I believe there is a spirit in Mt Rainier and it speaks to me. How is that different than Yahweh? Both are 'spiritual' beliefs. Twice a day I kneel towards the mountain and pray.

I once asked my mother (a Salvation Army captain) how we could tell when it was God speaking to us versus the Devil tempting us. She said that if it was telling us to do good, then it was God, but if it was telling us to do evil, then it was the Devil. The problem (or perhaps the solution) of that advice is that we would already have to know what was good and what was evil before we could determine who was speaking to us.
 

T.G.G. Moogly

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I once asked my mother (a Salvation Army captain) how we could tell when it was God speaking to us versus the Devil tempting us. She said that if it was telling us to do good, then it was God, but if it was telling us to do evil, then it was the Devil. The problem (or perhaps the solution) of that advice is that we would already have to know what was good and what was evil before we could determine who was speaking to us.
Which nicely illustrates my previous post, that people know what is good and evil, the person is the god or the claimed god is just an extension of what that person claims. In any case, god and "me" are equivalent. When someone isn't sure then the god becomes mysterious.
 

steve_bank

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Isn't it obvious that whenever a believer talks about "god" they are just talking about themselves? They've just made themselves into a god, imagined themselves as a superhero. They know what god wants and what god does and why god does it and what god thinks about things and how god is interested in them and on and on. Their god is just their superego. Every time they say "god" they are saying "me."
Good observation.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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One of the books I read as a kid was "There is a River", the story of Edgar Cayce. Cayce was a telepath who could, theory goes, place a book under his pillow at night and know the contents in the morning. He read people's illnesses and could direct them to a cure, which often was found in a book in the library. I was into this stuff also from "Hidden Channels of the Mind" by J. B. Rhine's wife Louisa. And, I can't say that I've read much Karl Jung, but he had a book about "The Collective Unconscious".
Jung's ideas originated over the issues he noticed regarding archetypes and how separated civilizations had common symbols, mythology, tales. He, at most pondered whether there could be a collective unconscious, but he never really took the idea too seriously.
 

Jarhyn

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I don't know,I find all the talk about a god or gods boring.I was raised RCC. Got over it in my early 20;s.I have read a far amount books on mythology,and that is all religion is,human myth.
I always thought the talk about God was rather interesting, personally.

It's all mythology yes, but the mythology has a lot of useful allegories, and a number of (admittedly unreliable) descriptions of a number of easily visible and extant phenomena.

That the mythology treats these rather poorly in it's dissection (or lack thereof) does not change the fact there is something there to dissect and study.

One of the books I read as a kid was "There is a River", the story of Edgar Cayce. Cayce was a telepath who could, theory goes, place a book under his pillow at night and know the contents in the morning. He read people's illnesses and could direct them to a cure, which often was found in a book in the library. I was into this stuff also from "Hidden Channels of the Mind" by J. B. Rhine's wife Louisa. And, I can't say that I've read much Karl Jung, but he had a book about "The Collective Unconscious".
Jung's ideas originated over the issues he noticed regarding archetypes and how separated civilizations had common symbols, mythology, tales. He, at most pondered whether there could be a collective unconscious, but he never really took the idea too seriously.
I find the more likely explanation to what he saw being early ubiquity of such common "seed stories", and the definite ubiquity of the desire to study the human mind from within and describe what we see.

Because many of us see the same things, on account of being derived from mostly the same constructive algorithm, we write similar stories and descriptions of it, especially given the common seed stories from prehistory.

It's not so much a collective unconscious, so much as a collective experience of our own humanity, plus the "collective ubiquity" owing to our common origins from a small handful of prehuman apes already uttering stories between each other.

It just happens that much of it seems "outside" on account of the fact that "other people see it too", and it is "outside the seat of self" even if it is actually still entirely inside their flesh, and in actuality a unique instance that does not really "call out" by unknowable means.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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Well that is where he went with it. But he was one to notice the "archetypes" and similarities, which was unexpected and needed an answer... and we pretty have it... without a single universal consciousness. We were bred with certain pattern seeking capabilities and generally having similar experiences and desires. It makes sense knowing what we know now.
 

Voland0

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... the story of Edgar Cayce. Cayce was a telepath who could, theory goes, place a book under his pillow at night and know the contents in the morning.
Did "There is a River" recount any skeptical examination of claims from, or about, Cayce?

It seems to me that for this sleep-time osmosis to work, as a "telepath", the book must be a mind. Since a book is a series of symbols to which we associate meanings, this requirement seems to be proscribed by definition.
 

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ɹǝpunuʍop puɐן

Wow! That was a great article. Thanks! I especially like Randi's comment about the hot soup.

I read a few of the books in the eighties, I got the impression that it may have been more a case of self deception, that he came to believe in his 'abilities,' rather than deliberate fraud and deception.
 

lostone

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I lived near Virginia Beach in the late 60s, where the Edgar Cayce museum is located. I had a friend who was, at that time, into Cayce. My opinion was that it was too much woo for me.
 
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