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Long Distance Runners are an Interesting Bunch

Rhea

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Some of them are in it for trophies and pursue races and higher and higher profile races. They write books about how marathons or ultras make people better. But they are not just marathoners, they are competitors for trophies.

Some of them run alone. Run a lot alone. And write books about what that does for the psyche.

Many seem to need strife and pain (and injury) to feel whole.

It’s interesting to contemplate the different personalities in long distance runners. But almost all of them seem to consider it critical to their well being.

Looking at Kefkezighi and his two books, 26 Marathons and Run to Overcome. Recalling also the book Born to Run. What winning the race is huge.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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I remember reading an article decades ago in a triathlon magazine that a workout was a good excuse to avoid real life... chores, bills, housework, etc... 'can't gotta work out.' Somewhat honest perspective on how athletics can be a lie sometimes.

Running is simple, you either like it or you don't. Honestly, there is little gain to running, that can't be found with other exercises. It is cheap. A friend from college got into running around 30, and is now having all sorts of problems with his hip and I keep telling him to let it go. But there seems to be a desperation to needing to run. I hated giving up on triathlon and running, but my joints and muscles were not playing well, and I didn't want a knee or hip replacement when I was 60. It hurt letting it go, but that's life sometimes. Some runners don't seem to be able to handle a life without running. It is sort of an addiction, it'd appear. Especially the longer distances. Your free life becomes a large percentage of running.

Then you have the nutcases that run the x number of marathons in x number of days or whatever. They keep trying to reach out further. Which is good, as long as it isn't killing their body.
 

TV and credit cards

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I remember reading an article decades ago in a triathlon magazine that a workout was a good excuse to avoid real life... chores, bills, housework, etc... 'can't gotta work out.' Somewhat honest perspective on how athletics can be a lie sometimes.
That’s funny. That was the one comforting thing about having to go out to sea. “I’d love to stay and be a responsible adult but I can’t and theres nothing I can do about it.”

Running is simple, you either like it or you don't. Honestly, there is little gain to running, that can't be found with other exercises. It is cheap. A friend from college got into running around 30, and is now having all sorts of problems with his hip and I keep telling him to let it go. But there seems to be a desperation to needing to run. I hated giving up on triathlon and running, but my joints and muscles were not playing well, and I didn't want a knee or hip replacement when I was 60. It hurt letting it go, but that's life sometimes. Some runners don't seem to be able to handle a life without running. It is sort of an addiction, it'd appear. Especially the longer distances. Your free life becomes a large percentage of running.

Then you have the nutcases that run the x number of marathons in x number of days or whatever. They keep trying to reach out further. Which is good, as long as it isn't killing their body.
I used to run every other day. Pavement, paths, hills. Had to conquer. By time I was forty, so much as kneeling down on a hard surface became a problem. It was an easy transition to biking. It keeps the muscles strong enough that my knees don’t give out just from standing.
 

Keith&Co.

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That’s funny. That was the one comforting thing about having to go out to sea. “I’d love to stay and be a responsible adult but I can’t and theres nothing I can do about it.”
Oh, yeah. After the twins were born, i was the only guy in the duty section who got more sleep on duty, on the boat, than my 'off' nights.
 
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