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Looking for manipulative hobbies as being shuttered in closes upon us

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
As a child I had several hobbies. Models of all sorts, woodwork and woodcraft, metal work, graphic arts of all sorts, sports mainly of the running and throwing kind, even collecting like stamps, coins, artifacts, and of course my adult favorites driving and listening to the radio and yard sales.

Now as driving becomes ever more hazardous the latter two and the physical ones become less appealing, even scary.

I'm still interested, I think, in modelling, hand woodcraft and art. Tried watercolor just before my youngest was murdered. Gave it up when that depressed.

I think I'm back.

So if you can thing of something outside cloth and yarn work that sounds interesting I'd appreciate we discuss them. I'm a pretty good learner and I'm not always a naybob. So here's a chance for me to tool up on positive discussions and searches for practical tasks with material outcomes.

So thanks to super cheese Ziprhead I have a place to ask and try.

First, what about woodworking like with wooden birds both just the carved using wood as the art and using fine grained wood and paint. I've collected a few of them by NW and Japanese artists and some of my friends have joined woodcarving groups. Before I begin, though I think I need a bit of backgroupd and method so I can evaluate the task against my physical and mental skills.

Any suggestions? Pretend I'm a complete novice.
 

DolphinDynasty

Senior Member
As a child I had several hobbies. Models of all sorts, woodwork and woodcraft, metal work, graphic arts of all sorts, sports mainly of the running and throwing kind, even collecting like stamps, coins, artifacts, and of course my adult favorites driving and listening to the radio and yard sales.

Now as driving becomes ever more hazardous the latter two and the physical ones become less appealing, even scary.

I'm still interested, I think, in modelling, hand woodcraft and art. Tried watercolor just before my youngest was murdered. Gave it up when that depressed.

I think I'm back.

So if you can thing of something outside cloth and yarn work that sounds interesting I'd appreciate we discuss them. I'm a pretty good learner and I'm not always a naybob. So here's a chance for me to tool up on positive discussions and searches for practical tasks with material outcomes.

So thanks to super cheese Ziprhead I have a place to ask and try.

First, what about woodworking like with wooden birds both just the carved using wood as the art and using fine grained wood and paint. I've collected a few of them by NW and Japanese artists and some of my friends have joined woodcarving groups. Before I begin, though I think I need a bit of backgroupd and method so I can evaluate the task against my physical and mental skills.

Any suggestions? Pretend I'm a complete novice.

Do you have any interests related to music? As a kid I played the flute and endeavored to teach myself the piano. I used to use it not just to pass the time or for the escapism but also to try and form my own instrumental pieces after a while.

Its the only hobby I want to get back to considering how self isolated and physically damaged my current conditions leave me. Also horse back riding, which while considered a rugged dangerous sport has never been anything less than enjoyable.

And then I write as well. I fancied making a living from it once upon a time but since that failure I still write, poetry, short stories and novels. I just don't make the mistake of sharing them with anyone ever again so it stays safe and keeps me safe and healthy too.

The only woodwork I've ever done was in shop class. I needed more tools than I've ever been able to procure on my own an only concentrated on making utility type objects with my own beveled detail work either with a burning tool or just a small gauged type lathing tool. (I forget their individual names).

For me it was harder to focus on the wood grain and tools in a way to create something rather than mess up and damage the piece, which was far easier to do than with other art-forms. You can paint over or erase work done on sketch pad or canvas far more often than with wood cutting/caring/burning tools. But that's me and my issues maintaining steady pressure when needed or exerting more force than I could manage, more because my muscle and nerve strength were not there yet and now I wouldn't try since my muscle and nerve issues would men relying on extra tool lie arm braces I cannot make and so will never get ahold of.

But if you've the skill and strength for it I could suggest looking for tutorials online, and maybe sitting in on one of the groups your friend joined when they discuss method and tools.
 

gmbteach

Mrs Frizzle
What about buildings for model trains? I have a house here.

Bilby and I bought this place because it has a train set building. A demountable annex that we plan to put a train set into.
 

Angry Floof

Tricksy Leftits
Staff member
What about buildings for model trains? I have a house here.

Bilby and I bought this place because it has a train set building. A demountable annex that we plan to put a train set into.

I've been thinking that making dollhouse furniture might be a fun hobby. There's so many different arts that can be used in the process. Tiny beaded lampshades, tiny lace thread afghans, tiny toothpick picture frames, tiny painted popsicle stick tables...

Not a hobby I can start any time soon, but eventually.
 

gmbteach

Mrs Frizzle
What about buildings for model trains? I have a house here.

Bilby and I bought this place because it has a train set building. A demountable annex that we plan to put a train set into.

I've been thinking that making dollhouse furniture might be a fun hobby. There's so many different arts that can be used in the process. Tiny beaded lampshades, tiny lace thread afghans, tiny toothpick picture frames, tiny painted popsicle stick tables...

Not a hobby I can start any time soon, but eventually.

Oh, that sounds fun! I think making the doll house alone would be amazing! Then to decorate each room!
 

Angry Floof

Tricksy Leftits
Staff member
What about buildings for model trains? I have a house here.

Bilby and I bought this place because it has a train set building. A demountable annex that we plan to put a train set into.

I've been thinking that making dollhouse furniture might be a fun hobby. There's so many different arts that can be used in the process. Tiny beaded lampshades, tiny lace thread afghans, tiny toothpick picture frames, tiny painted popsicle stick tables...

Not a hobby I can start any time soon, but eventually.

Oh, that sounds fun! I think making the doll house alone would be amazing! Then to decorate each room!

All the fun of buying and decorating a real house but much cheaper!
 

Underseer

Contributor
I like to kidnap Republican legislators, tie them up, and molest them by jamming Star Wars figurines in their rectums.

Does this count as a hobby?

More importantly, what I am doing is legal, isn't it? I probably should have checked first before starting, but you know how it is when you get excited about a new project[ent]hellip[/ent]
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Do you have any interests related to music?

Thanks for mentioning music. I actually have tried to learn fiddling and keyboarding. Bride and I took two classes in fiddle for beginners here in speederfundus from a ms Castle. She is quite good. My daughter her husband and Nico our grandson are the only ones who've spent time on them though. The adults are well trained and Nico whats to be like mommy and daddy. So I have some basic tools and music for that as well as kids willing to tolerate dad trying. I've tried using music writing programs and had studied some very basic music theory. Making new music is fun but from what I write it sounds pretty bad. Maybe I'll try again.

As you know technical skill and precision are required for satisfying output from traditional instruments. So If I can still discipline myself music might join projects I consider and try.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
I've been thinking that making dollhouse furniture might be a fun hobby. There's so many different arts that can be used in the process. Tiny beaded lampshades, tiny lace thread afghans, tiny toothpick picture frames, tiny painted popsicle stick tables...

Not a hobby I can start any time soon, but eventually.

I've thought about this too. Amazing how atheist minds work. I have a fair amount of balsa and a Dremel tool set around somewhere. Mostly I'm restricted to Lincoln logs since my daughter doesn't want Nico to use them when he's got Legos. Neither them nor an erector set. OK better for me.

I feel like I should be doing all this stuff. However I think I'll try to be more social in my new hobby. Out here that means either quilting or woodworking. Still .... ....
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
I like to kidnap Republican legislators, tie them up, and molest them by jamming Star Wars figurines in their rectums.

Does this count as a hobby?

Who cares whether it's legal. Think of it as a virtual hobby. You build a model of your target repbulicasshole and jam the figurines up it's clay arse part. Then you show them of Instagram or Facebook or even Twitter. You don't need to do the electronic stuff actually. I'm thinking the virtual operation would be curative enough.
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.
 

Elixir

Content Thief
Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

How difficult are cars?
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

How difficult are cars?

Depends... some are "only twice as hard" because you are only dealing with a second pin set. some are nearly impossible without a specially designed tool. And some pop right open using a simple bump key.

I only pick locks that I own or that I know are owned by the person asking me to pick it, and I wouldn't want to damage my car

The fun hobby aspect of lock picking is working with "secure" pin tumbler locks. Pin tumblers make up about 80% of all locks.. .and the other 20% use basically the same principle, except without pins. The "secure" aspect of the pins is where the manufacturer specifically designs the shape of the pins such that it challenges the lock picker by giving "false feedback" - like milling a groove into the side of a pin so it catches on the break line, instead of clearing it.. and feels cleared to the inexperienced picker. Without security pins, a lock can be picked in seconds (I am barely intermediate in skill and can open any "smooth" pin tumbler lock in about 5 seconds.... literally 4 or 5 hand movements to pop it open. Once I open a lock once, I can open it repeatedly in about 1 second... not because I am good.. because most locks are just that bad.

The whole "sport" is very "touchy feely"... its all about feeling the pins and finding the one that is binding the cylinder and then manipulating it with your tool just past the break line... then find the next pin, then the next, then.. POP!

It is SO satisfying.

PS - this is a sport, not a practical utility... it is far easier to smash a window, kick down a door, or use large bolt cutters... the whole point of this is non-destructive entry.
 

Elixir

Content Thief
Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

How difficult are cars?

Depends... some are "only twice as hard" because you are only dealing with a second pin set. some are nearly impossible without a specially designed tool. And some pop right open using a simple bump key.

I only pick locks that I own or that I know are owned by the person asking me to pick it, and I wouldn't want to damage my car

The fun hobby aspect of lock picking is working with "secure" pin tumbler locks. Pin tumblers make up about 80% of all locks.. .and the other 20% use basically the same principle, except without pins. The "secure" aspect of the pins is where the manufacturer specifically designs the shape of the pins such that it challenges the lock picker by giving "false feedback" - like milling a groove into the side of a pin so it catches on the break line, instead of clearing it.. and feels cleared to the inexperienced picker. Without security pins, a lock can be picked in seconds (I am barely intermediate in skill and can open any "smooth" pin tumbler lock in about 5 seconds.... literally 4 or 5 hand movements to pop it open. Once I open a lock once, I can open it repeatedly in about 1 second... not because I am good.. because most locks are just that bad.

The whole "sport" is very "touchy feely"... its all about feeling the pins and finding the one that is binding the cylinder and then manipulating it with your tool just past the break line... then find the next pin, then the next, then.. POP!

It is SO satisfying.

PS - this is a sport, not a practical utility... it is far easier to smash a window, kick down a door, or use large bolt cutters... the whole point of this is non-destructive entry.

Very cool. And there ARE many situations where a non-destructive entry is a preferred solution. Elsewhere I commented on the obsolescence of manual skillsets, but this one seems relatively exempt.
I can definitely see its therapeutic value too.
 

TV and credit cards

Veteran Member
I've thought about picture framing for later in life. I've gotten pictures framed twice and have muttered expletives under my breath both times at the quote. Could be a nice hobby that might make a bit of money too.

I've used my Dremel more frequently as time has past. They make a lot of very useful bits for their basic rotary tool. I'm currently using their tungsten bit to shave metal from my bicycle fork to make more space for some wooden bicycle fenders I bought. Woody's, over in Bend makes some nice fenders. That's a good niche to be in. If you want nice fenders for a bicycle, there are no other options I'm aware of.
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
Depends... some are "only twice as hard" because you are only dealing with a second pin set. some are nearly impossible without a specially designed tool. And some pop right open using a simple bump key.

I only pick locks that I own or that I know are owned by the person asking me to pick it, and I wouldn't want to damage my car

The fun hobby aspect of lock picking is working with "secure" pin tumbler locks. Pin tumblers make up about 80% of all locks.. .and the other 20% use basically the same principle, except without pins. The "secure" aspect of the pins is where the manufacturer specifically designs the shape of the pins such that it challenges the lock picker by giving "false feedback" - like milling a groove into the side of a pin so it catches on the break line, instead of clearing it.. and feels cleared to the inexperienced picker. Without security pins, a lock can be picked in seconds (I am barely intermediate in skill and can open any "smooth" pin tumbler lock in about 5 seconds.... literally 4 or 5 hand movements to pop it open. Once I open a lock once, I can open it repeatedly in about 1 second... not because I am good.. because most locks are just that bad.

The whole "sport" is very "touchy feely"... its all about feeling the pins and finding the one that is binding the cylinder and then manipulating it with your tool just past the break line... then find the next pin, then the next, then.. POP!

It is SO satisfying.

PS - this is a sport, not a practical utility... it is far easier to smash a window, kick down a door, or use large bolt cutters... the whole point of this is non-destructive entry.

Very cool. And there ARE many situations where a non-destructive entry is a preferred solution. Elsewhere I commented on the obsolescence of manual skillsets, but this one seems relatively exempt.
I can definitely see its therapeutic value too.

Ya, I noticed that conversation and see what you mean... no fewer locksmiths out there today than yesterday... more, if anything.
and with increased technology, come more varied and specialized locksmiths.., in cyber security, the hacker is the picker... which explains why in my field so many people have tinkered with lock picking in their lifetime.

If you can't pick a lock, you can't design a pick-proof lock. That is one of the reasons that Locksport is supported by the manufacturers... pickers are the white hat hackers of physical security. Manufacturers want to know their flaws so they can design better locks. That is not always the case with software companies... but the philosophy is the same. Fucking Bill Gates set the industry down the wrong path for decades.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
"Manipulative hobbies"?
Have you thought of trying to influence an election in another country through social media? That seems pretty manipulative to me.

Don't you know people get correctness police waivers when the turn 75 on most fora.

It's kind of a nice for a thought task though where one can conceptually waive morality of most any stripe.

Crazy!
 

dendrast

Senior Member
Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

How difficult are cars?

Safes. That's where the money is.
 

Philos

Veteran Member
What about buildings for model trains? I have a house here.

Bilby and I bought this place because it has a train set building. A demountable annex that we plan to put a train set into.

Gaynor,

Techie Alert! I have every item made by Hornby Dublo in the 1950s. All metal, tinplate and in the original boxes. Put it on a large layout and listened to the heavy engines rattling around on the tin rails. All the buildings, Dinky buses and little lead people.

Put away now; dry stored.

http://www.advertisingarchives.co.uk/detail/12174/1/Magazine-Advert/Hornby-Dublo/1950s

A.
 

Angry Floof

Tricksy Leftits
Staff member
What about buildings for model trains? I have a house here.

Bilby and I bought this place because it has a train set building. A demountable annex that we plan to put a train set into.

Gaynor,

Techie Alert! I have every item made by Hornby Dublo in the 1950s. All metal, tinplate and in the original boxes. Put it on a large layout and listened to the heavy engines rattling around on the tin rails. All the buildings, Dinky buses and little lead people.

Put away now; dry stored.

http://www.advertisingarchives.co.uk/detail/12174/1/Magazine-Advert/Hornby-Dublo/1950s

A.

You mean NERD alert. :D
 

gmbteach

Mrs Frizzle
What about buildings for model trains? I have a house here.

Bilby and I bought this place because it has a train set building. A demountable annex that we plan to put a train set into.

Gaynor,

Techie Alert! I have every item made by Hornby Dublo in the 1950s. All metal, tinplate and in the original boxes. Put it on a large layout and listened to the heavy engines rattling around on the tin rails. All the buildings, Dinky buses and little lead people.

Put away now; dry stored.

http://www.advertisingarchives.co.uk/detail/12174/1/Magazine-Advert/Hornby-Dublo/1950s

A.
Alex,

I am so jealous! We have the room for it, but nothing to out in it!

Gaynor.
 

Underseer

Contributor
I like to kidnap Republican legislators, tie them up, and molest them by jamming Star Wars figurines in their rectums.

Does this count as a hobby?

Who cares whether it's legal. Think of it as a virtual hobby. You build a model of your target repbulicasshole and jam the figurines up it's clay arse part. Then you show them of Instagram or Facebook or even Twitter. You don't need to do the electronic stuff actually. I'm thinking the virtual operation would be curative enough.

Model.

Uh, sure.

I'm definitely using models. And if I'm not, they were asking for it by dressing provocatively.
 

Tigers!

Veteran Member
Lock Picking - huge fun... It's basically solving a mechanical puzzle. There is competitive lock picking in the UK - called Locksport. In the US, lock pick tools are not illegal (as long as you are not caught committing a crime with them), they are very cheap ($25 for a basic set), and you can find locks to pick everywhere... (start with Master padlocks - once you can get a Master open in less than 10 seconds, move on to real locks - Brinks, anything made in Germany...) a lifetime to master the best locks.. plenty of youtube how-to videos.
Only downside is that once you realize how easy it is to pick an average lock, you are going to end up buying new locks for your doors... and not from Homedepot or Lowes either.

A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

I am not telling you my address.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

So he brought his shed over to your place so you could demonstrate?

If not, why did he file a police report the next morning?

I'll bet he was more surprised by the gun in your hand than by your skill in picking locks.

Inviting more appropriate responses to Malintent
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

So he brought his shed over to your place so you could demonstrate?

If not, why did he file a police report the next morning?

I'll bet he was more surprised by the gun in your hand than by your skill in picking locks.

Inviting more appropriate responses to Malintent

I happen to know where my friend lives... I do go over there from time to time to visit, even though my place is generally a better hangout.

What is so much fun is introducing others to the sport / hobby.... My parents were visiting some time ago when I had just got into it and I showed my stepmother how to do it... she popped her first lock in like 15 minutes... the surprise and satisfaction on her face was priceless... granted, it was a "trainer" lock...

Trainer locks are cool... they are normal padlocks with a key, except the body of the lock is made of clear plastic. That way, you can see all the pins and the cylinder while you pick at them to see what you are doing and learn the right feel for it. Also a great way just to teach how a lock works...you can see all the inner workings as the lock is operated.
 

DolphinDynasty

Senior Member
A friend of mine challenged me to get into his locked shed. I told him to time me. Before he got his phone out of his pocket, I was in. The look on his face was priceless.

So he brought his shed over to your place so you could demonstrate?

If not, why did he file a police report the next morning?

I'll bet he was more surprised by the gun in your hand than by your skill in picking locks.

Inviting more appropriate responses to Malintent

I happen to know where my friend lives... I do go over there from time to time to visit, even though my place is generally a better hangout.

What is so much fun is introducing others to the sport / hobby.... My parents were visiting some time ago when I had just got into it and I showed my stepmother how to do it... she popped her first lock in like 15 minutes... the surprise and satisfaction on her face was priceless... granted, it was a "trainer" lock...

Trainer locks are cool... they are normal padlocks with a key, except the body of the lock is made of clear plastic. That way, you can see all the pins and the cylinder while you pick at them to see what you are doing and learn the right feel for it. Also a great way just to teach how a lock works...you can see all the inner workings as the lock is operated.

Can you do a car starter without damaging it? I lost my car keys and really don't feel like paying more than the car's worth or having to take anything apart to get keys to work so I'm curious.
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
I never tried an ignition lock... I would imagine it is like any other pin tumbler (the door locks are usually discus or wafer locks - similar in principle). Picking is non-destructive, so anything is worth a try. My wife had a car decades ago that started with a screwdriver... like, she needed to use a screwdriver to start it.
 

bilby

Fair dinkum thinkum
Back in the 1980s, I had a clapped out old Bedford van in which the ignition lock barrel had disintegrated; behind the barrel was a simple slot that actually controlled the switch, so if you simply took out the barrel, a standard flat-blade screwdriver worked just fine.

It was security by obscurity - the lock was apparently only there to give the impression to the uneducated that there was a need for a key. The thing was a total piece of crap though - if you had stolen it by use of a screwdriver, you would probably have got more money selling the screwdriver than you would selling the van.
 

whollygoats

Banned
I never tried an ignition lock... I would imagine it is like any other pin tumbler (the door locks are usually discus or wafer locks - similar in principle). Picking is non-destructive, so anything is worth a try. My wife had a car decades ago that started with a screwdriver... like, she needed to use a screwdriver to start it.

Didn't the alcohol and orange juice corrode the steering column?

It must have made the floor around the foot controls pretty sticky.
 
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whollygoats

Banned
I like how people here think. Lock picks and tampering with elections overseas. And anal insertions to the deserving.

I recently faced this issue when I retired from my 'career' of some thirty plus years.

I, too, am somewhere near you in the wet side of Cascadia. In Puddle City, actually, where "put a bird on it" is a common catchphrase. So, I was looking at the means to burn up months of indoor captivity. I opted to go back to models. The plastic styrene types. I can't afford the print advert or super types. Aircraft. It kind of addresses my 'artistic', historical, and aviation interests in an activity which requires hand to eye coordination and fine motor skills.

That and surfing the net for free pornography provides all the manipulation I need for the time being.

I think that woodworking would be a far more useful set of skills to develop, but I've never been particularly adept at the skill set required and the investment in tools and materials in order to accomplish something prideful is daunting.

The one area which interests me is a small-scale furnace for metal work...but again, the investment barriers to entry are too high for me.

I did lampworking of glass, primarily of beads, as an adjunct to my wife's lacemaking hobby. It was interesting for a while. It's cheap and easy to get in to. Much cheaper than leaded glass, which I also did for a limited period of time (one finished piece).

A small lathe, perhaps?

My wife dabbled in being a musician. She did the fiddle routine and got sidetracked in to luthier work. For years, she played Irish harp. She tried mandolin, but finally settled on ukulele. I would point out that ukulele seems to be easy and excellent instruments can be got for decent prices. Me? I'm a dead loss at music.
 

Mumbles

Veteran Member
Hmmm...

I'm convinced as far as learning to pick locks goes.

So, I was hospitalized for...reasons I discussed in another thread. When I got home, I was initially fairly weak and shakey, so I took up building Lego kits. They require fairly little coordination most of the time, and they help with re-learning how to follow instructions.

I eventually moved on, somewhat. I still do Lego kits, but I've also learned how to solder, and have rearranged spare apartment room into an electronics workstation. Unfortunately, I haven't pu together space for, say, a 3-d printer, but I do manual soldering, having put together, among other things, a clock using Soviet-era nixie tubes.
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
I like how people here think. Lock picks and tampering with elections overseas. And anal insertions to the deserving.

I recently faced this issue when I retired from my 'career' of some thirty plus years.

I, too, am somewhere near you in the wet side of Cascadia. In Puddle City, actually, where "put a bird on it" is a common catchphrase. So, I was looking at the means to burn up months of indoor captivity. I opted to go back to models. The plastic styrene types. I can't afford the print advert or super types. Aircraft. It kind of addresses my 'artistic', historical, and aviation interests in an activity which requires hand to eye coordination and fine motor skills.

That and surfing the net for free pornography provides all the manipulation I need for the time being.

I think that woodworking would be a far more useful set of skills to develop, but I've never been particularly adept at the skill set required and the investment in tools and materials in order to accomplish something prideful is daunting.

The one area which interests me is a small-scale furnace for metal work...but again, the investment barriers to entry are too high for me.

I did lampworking of glass, primarily of beads, as an adjunct to my wife's lacemaking hobby. It was interesting for a while. It's cheap and easy to get in to. Much cheaper than leaded glass, which I also did for a limited period of time (one finished piece).

A small lathe, perhaps?

My wife dabbled in being a musician. She did the fiddle routine and got sidetracked in to luthier work. For years, she played Irish harp. She tried mandolin, but finally settled on ukulele. I would point out that ukulele seems to be easy and excellent instruments can be got for decent prices. Me? I'm a dead loss at music.

I'm with you on the metal working... While a small, cheap DYI furnace can be made with a tin can (as a mold) and plaster (which does not hold up for many firings), welding requires a bit of investment in tools... I'm interested, but unable to invest the money or space.

Woodworking may be my main hobby, in terms of investment of tools... in my opinion, 1 table saw with a few home-made jigs is all any starting woodworker needs. almost any cut can be made on a table saw (with a tremendous amount of preparation - the jigs)... all other tools are just better / easier ways to do the same. pine is VERY forgiving... any soft wood... precision is not necessary to make pieces fit together.. unlike metal.

I'd love a lathe... some of the most beautiful (and complex) woodwork I've ever seen came off a lathe. It's just not the kind of work I do... maybe if I want a whole lot of wood bowls for something some day... Or did you mean a metal lathe? I'd rather a CNC machine if we're going that far, heh.
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
Hmmm...

I'm convinced as far as learning to pick locks goes.

So, I was hospitalized for...reasons I discussed in another thread. When I got home, I was initially fairly weak and shakey, so I took up building Lego kits. They require fairly little coordination most of the time, and they help with re-learning how to follow instructions.

I eventually moved on, somewhat. I still do Lego kits, but I've also learned how to solder, and have rearranged spare apartment room into an electronics workstation. Unfortunately, I haven't pu together space for, say, a 3-d printer, but I do manual soldering, having put together, among other things, a clock using Soviet-era nixie tubes.

Cool.. you'll want to look for a training lock like this ($10): https://www.amazon.com/KINGLAKE-Pro...&qid=1514903992&sr=8-3&keywords=practice+lock

.. and then also start collecting regular padlocks from wherever you can find them... you can spend anywhere from $2 to $75 for one. Or, visit a locksmith and tell them that you want to learn to pick... they may just give you a box full... Or just ask your friends if they have any locks they lost the key for...

As for picking tools... https://www.southord.com/ is where I bought mine... the ones on Amazon are cheap, from China, and won't be delivered until 2019, if ever.

Also, stay away from "Disk Detainer Locks"... they are fairly rare, so the skill to open them is practically useless...but more importantly, they cannot be picked with normal lockpicking tools... they need a purpose-built disk detainer pic. Ever see those old bank heist movies where some contraption is connected to the safe with a big wheel on it that the thief turns while listening? That's a disk detainer pick... maybe worth your time to learn and play with... but good luck finding a pick for it for under $75 that ships to the US.

Also, please do check your local laws about picking... there are some places where the tools are illegal to possess unless you are a registered locksmith... In NY, it's fine, unless you are criminally trespassing or otherwise have been detained for suspicion of burglary.. if you have picks on you then it can be problematic.

In the UK, "locksport" is a thing... prizes and such.... sponsored by the security devices manufacturers... they get free "bug testing", in a manner of speaking.
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
LEGOS! I almost forgot the Legos! I am too old to be playing with Legos... That what my wife said. She's wrong.

I am fascinated with the Lego Mindstorm EV3. I want to make this:

[YOUTUBE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xCd55oSgO4[/YOUTUBE]
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
LEGOS! I almost forgot the Legos! I am too old to be playing with Legos... That what my wife said. She's wrong.

I am fascinated with the Lego Mindstorm EV3. I want to make this:

[YOUTUBE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xCd55oSgO4[/YOUTUBE]

:hysterical:
 

Mumbles

Veteran Member
LEGOS! I almost forgot the Legos! I am too old to be playing with Legos... That what my wife said. She's wrong.

I am fascinated with the Lego Mindstorm EV3. I want to make this:

[YOUTUBE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xCd55oSgO4[/YOUTUBE]

I'd love to look into that sort of thing, but the EV3's price, even used, is always just a bit rich for my tastes.
 

gmbteach

Mrs Frizzle
LEGOS! I almost forgot the Legos! I am too old to be playing with Legos... That what my wife said. She's wrong.

I am fascinated with the Lego Mindstorm EV3. I want to make this:

[YOUTUBE]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xCd55oSgO4[/YOUTUBE]

I'd love to look into that sort of thing, but the EV3's price, even used, is always just a bit rich for my tastes.
I would love a lego mindstorm kit! I played with them as a science/technology teacher years ago!
 

Malintent

Veteran Member
I agree, Legos are super overpriced in general. Considering you are getting a couple of servos with stepping motors, an assortment of sensors, and a programmable "brain"... the price is not too bad.. for Lego.

one could buy an Arduino and all of the robotic components for about half that price... but it wont just "snap together" in limitless forms.
 

Mumbles

Veteran Member
It's actually almost absurd of me to complain too much about the price, given the Lego sets I already own (a freaking Helicarrier!?), but yeah, when I consider it versus just implementing things with a simpler board (I was considering something like a Teensy would be enough for many simpler programs), and I'm sure others have though of, and likely done, the same.

Might be something to look for on Youtube at some point. the only show I regularly watch that does anything similar is Ben Heck, and I don't think he does Lego at all, but I'm sure there are others out there. And while a simple "Ultimate Machine" is easy enough, one that can retract it's switch, dodge an incoming hand, and so on is a bit more complex than that.

(Although, being an engineer, my brain *immediately* began thinking of how I could use parts around my house to do this, what else I'd need, and so on. a few sensors, a toggle, a few motors? Sounds kinda simple in practice.)
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
I like to kidnap Republican legislators, tie them up, and molest them by jamming Star Wars figurines in their rectums.

Does this count as a hobby?

More importantly, what I am doing is legal, isn't it? I probably should have checked first before starting, but you know how it is when you get excited about a new project[ent]hellip[/ent]

Time passes and the plague moves west. Oregon democrats fashioned a cap and trade bill after California. Republicans in the house where they have enough seats to stop the bill if they don't vote skedaddled. Looking high and low, now getting ready to fine them $500 a day for shirking responsibility. Still no Republican House members anywhere. I think democrats tried something like this in Wisconsin with bad result a few years back.

Our local rep, a republican naturally, tried to spread some pretty tall fibs in an OP ED in a local paper. Tried to say we don't need to do this because oregon doesn't pollute. Of course he cited a stat showing Oregon produces only 0.0014% of world pollution.

How dumb does he think we are. Apparently many down here ate it up until I noted that Oregon has about 0.0005 percent of world population living on 0.0005 percent of land in world making Oregon responsible for three times it's share of pollution in the world.

Eyup. Safe to say republicans here aren't any smarter than Trump.

In conclusion it is a hobby here in oregon hunting down hiding representatives. Maybe they aren't hiding in an adjacent state - average income suggests they can't afford it - but they sure are trying to build a dung pile where Big lumber, yes lumber, runs amok clear cutting forests increasing fire and flood dangers and selling it to our Chinese friends.

Meanwhile I'm spending many hours whittling with my small hand tools a 3"x3"x8" vertical grained hardwood block into a standing river otter. As a result of little progress other than wearing out my thumb recently I went out and bought a larger tool and a mallet. Things are progressing faster now.
 
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fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Gee. It's been a year now. Shuttered in has taken on a whole new meaning.

Block looks a bit like the beast I see within it. Going very slow though. That's mostly because we've been sheltering in place since February. Seems loss of fellow whittlers makes things slow way, way, down. I really miss the companionship of like minded old pfarts wielding knives and other sharp tools in the name of "Let me out."

But here we are.
 

J842P

Veteran Member
It's actually almost absurd of me to complain too much about the price, given the Lego sets I already own (a freaking Helicarrier!?), but yeah, when I consider it versus just implementing things with a simpler board (I was considering something like a Teensy would be enough for many simpler programs), and I'm sure others have though of, and likely done, the same.

Might be something to look for on Youtube at some point. the only show I regularly watch that does anything similar is Ben Heck, and I don't think he does Lego at all, but I'm sure there are others out there. And while a simple "Ultimate Machine" is easy enough, one that can retract it's switch, dodge an incoming hand, and so on is a bit more complex than that.

(Although, being an engineer, my brain *immediately* began thinking of how I could use parts around my house to do this, what else I'd need, and so on. a few sensors, a toggle, a few motors? Sounds kinda simple in practice.)

If you are going to get a Teensy for 16 bucks, might as well shell out 35 bucks for a Raspberry Pi:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-4-model-b/

Pretty crazy specs given the price:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-4-model-b/specifications/
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Talked to my six year old grandson whose in Japan where his parents are teaching at an AF base.

He was interested in how mommy and daddy made babies. I ducked. After talk he's going to look into what a fish has to do to become a land animal. My hint was for him to presume that fish more or less could be a land animal if they adapted what they had going for them as fish. The idea is to see the fish as a hand thumb up and the land animal as a hand thumb right. I said he should concentrate on going from fins to legs and from swim bladder to lungs - No he doesn't know anything about getting from fins to legs or even that bony fish have swim bladders. - that's what his parents are for. It helps to be 7000 miles away. He and his parents are going to work on that and report back in about a week.

Then he began talking about planets. This became my christmas present query. It came down to he wanted to see the moons of Saturn and Jupiter. He knows I have a telescope. He was wondering if he could use it. I explained it was quite a big telescope. over six feet long, heavy, and on a mechanical tripod. Also it's down in LA where my son, now retired, is using it.

So I explained to him and his mum that stargazing is pretty dependent on both weather and one's ability to spend time freezing outside. We decided it would be better if he got a reflector scope that had a motorized mount and video camera. That way, clouds permitting, he could sit in the comfort of his home and see the planets remotely.

That got him going on another topic, building and controlling moving things like RC cars and robots like his uncle is doing in LA.

Yeah he's average. NOT.

So now bride and I are planning on either sending him about $1500 worth of telescope HW and SW or about $700 dollars of RC car modules. Most of you are probably saying "Well that's excessive." It's not. His birthday is December 18. He's a Jewish Catholic. They celebrate both.


He and parents are going to get back to us on which one this year. OK now that's excessive.


No. We're not spoiling him. His parents are. We're just the Money Guy.

Cummon.
 
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