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Missing White Male

In another thread, someone was very upset that missing males don't get the same coverage as missing white females. So, the purpose of this thread is to discuss Brian Laundrie who went missing. It's possible in theory that someone killed him. I'm just saying...
 

Politesse

Sapere aude
Around here, there was a huge hubbub last mointh surrounding a missing hiker, Philip Kreycik. who'd disappeared while on a jog near his affluent techie neighborhood, though I think this had more to do with the massive amount of money, influence, and volunteer searchers being dispatched by his family. Unfortunately, he was eventually found dead. The tenor of the news reporting / rumor mill contained a definite note of "who could imagine such a thing happening in one of our neighborhoods? We're supposed to be safe on this side of the hill, not like Oakland."

I think it is certainly true that some disappearances are treated as national crises while others are blatantly ignored as unimportant. Demographics aside, I think this usually comes down to whether they have a wealthy family or not. American police are useless, they don't actually look for missing people unless the social connections that person has are able to provide them with extra motivation or pressure.
 

Toni

Contributor
I disagree that police are useless and only look for missing people from wealthy families. It IS true that fairly often, when the missing person is a teenager or very young adult, there is a greater presumption that the missing person is a runaway (as if that meant they were less likely to be in danger). Missing children and vulnerable adults garner a lot of local attention. So do missing boaters, hunters and fishermen and snow mobilers. Less often missing hikers in my corner of the state but more so in larger wilderness areas. Most such cases only get local or sometimes regional attention

Note: I live in a small city (25K) surrounded by smaller towns but mostly farmland, some forested area, prairies, lakes and rivers. The nearest large metropolitan area is more than 100 miles away.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
I disagree that police are useless and only look for missing people from wealthy families. It IS true that fairly often, when the missing person is a teenager or very young adult, there is a greater presumption that the missing person is a runaway (as if that meant they were less likely to be in danger). Missing children and vulnerable adults garner a lot of local attention. So do missing boaters, hunters and fishermen and snow mobilers. Less often missing hikers in my corner of the state but more so in larger wilderness areas. Most such cases only get local or sometimes regional attention

Note: I live in a small city (25K) surrounded by smaller towns but mostly farmland, some forested area, prairies, lakes and rivers. The nearest large metropolitan area is more than 100 miles away.

Yes, what the police suspect to be the situation plays a big role in the sort of search that's mounted.

The police generally only put in much effort when it's someone they suspect is in danger and not due to their own criminal activities. (Which means missing prostitutes don't get looked for--but to a considerable degree this is because it's basically futile. If it was a serial killer in the car rather than a normal john the chance of catching him is basically zero other than through his screwing up. Throwing a lot of effort into a hopeless case isn't a good use of resources.)
 

Toni

Contributor
I disagree that police are useless and only look for missing people from wealthy families. It IS true that fairly often, when the missing person is a teenager or very young adult, there is a greater presumption that the missing person is a runaway (as if that meant they were less likely to be in danger). Missing children and vulnerable adults garner a lot of local attention. So do missing boaters, hunters and fishermen and snow mobilers. Less often missing hikers in my corner of the state but more so in larger wilderness areas. Most such cases only get local or sometimes regional attention

Note: I live in a small city (25K) surrounded by smaller towns but mostly farmland, some forested area, prairies, lakes and rivers. The nearest large metropolitan area is more than 100 miles away.

Yes, what the police suspect to be the situation plays a big role in the sort of search that's mounted.

The police generally only put in much effort when it's someone they suspect is in danger and not due to their own criminal activities. (Which means missing prostitutes don't get looked for--but to a considerable degree this is because it's basically futile. If it was a serial killer in the car rather than a normal john the chance of catching him is basically zero other than through his screwing up. Throwing a lot of effort into a hopeless case isn't a good use of resources.)

Everything is hopeless if you don’t try.

Serial killers get lots of press but they are relatively rare. Still, where there are suspicions of a serial killer at work, it’s pretty important to devote redirected time catching them, don’t you think?

Maybe I’m reading you wrong but it seems as though you also don’t think prostitutes’ murders need investigating?

And I’m not sure why you jumped to prostitutes here?

Teens/young adults who are missing are often runaways (which dies carry danger) or are blowing off steam or staying with friends and come home on their own. But obviously that’s not always the case. Children who are missing sometimes have wandered off but are more likely to have been taken by a noncustodial parent or other family member. Sometimes they have been kidnapped by strangers and in any case because they are children certainly their disappearances need investigating.
 

Elixir

Content Thief
Speaking of missing white males, wasn't this thread created specifically to address the complaint about missing males never being investigated?
Where's Derec?
 

thebeave

Veteran Member
Speaking of missing white males, wasn't this thread created specifically to address the complaint about missing males never being investigated?
Where's Derec?

Nope. Here's the first sentence of this thread:

In another thread, someone was very upset that missing males don't get the same coverage as missing white females.
 

Elixir

Content Thief
Speaking of missing white males, wasn't this thread created specifically to address the complaint about missing males never being investigated?
Where's Derec?

Nope. Here's the first sentence of this thread:

In another thread, someone was very upset that missing males don't get the same coverage as missing white females.

So THIS was an entirely disingenuous expression? That's quite believable, actually.
 

thebeave

Veteran Member
Nope. Here's the first sentence of this thread:

So THIS was an entirely disingenuous expression? That's quite believable, actually.

Sigh. I guess I will never understand why the side of the political spectrum that claims to be passionate and caring for all of humanity does its best to dismiss the value and concerns of half the population...men. Don't you all have husbands, fathers, brothers, sons, nephews, and male friends you care about? If one of them went missing under suspicious circumstances, would you want people dismissing your concerns about their whereabouts just because they're a man and not a woman?
 
Nope. Here's the first sentence of this thread:

So THIS was an entirely disingenuous expression? That's quite believable, actually.

Sigh. I guess I will never understand why the side of the political spectrum that claims to be passionate and caring for all of humanity does its best to dismiss the value and concerns of half the population...men. Don't you all have husbands, fathers, brothers, sons, nephews, and male friends you care about? If one of them went missing under suspicious circumstances, would you want people dismissing your concerns about their whereabouts just because they're a man and not a woman?

Why are you griping about no one paying attention to men disappearing under suspicious circumstances in a thread about a man who disappeared under suspicious circumstances?

John Walsh said today he doesn't think Brian even went to the swamp. Agree or disagree?

Do you think the murdererer got him?
 

Jarhyn

Contributor
So on the subject of "missing white male", I was browsing Reddit today and this came up:

https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/...medium=android_app&utm_source=share&context=3

Assuming that the link works, it will bring you to an interesting comment thread where people might start to explain at least some of the discrepancies.

Essentially the urge to fuck off and tell nobody is a reasonably widespread phenomena. I expect that there is a similar difference seen in resolve to execute that manifests in a lot of "dads who went out for a pack", that is not similarly reflected by women.

It's still an attrocious thing that concern is not well distributed among victims.
 

thebeave

Veteran Member
Sigh. I guess I will never understand why the side of the political spectrum that claims to be passionate and caring for all of humanity does its best to dismiss the value and concerns of half the population...men. Don't you all have husbands, fathers, brothers, sons, nephews, and male friends you care about? If one of them went missing under suspicious circumstances, would you want people dismissing your concerns about their whereabouts just because they're a man and not a woman?

Why are you griping about no one paying attention to men disappearing under suspicious circumstances in a thread about a man who disappeared under suspicious circumstances?

John Walsh said today he doesn't think Brian even went to the swamp. Agree or disagree?

Do you think the murdererer got him?

Your blatant mockery of missing men by equating a murderer on the run to innocent men who have gone missing for unknown reasons just proves my point. I wonder what the family of this missing young man would think of your attitude?

https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/23/us/families-missing-black-people/index.html

(CNN)David Robinson has been in Arizona for the last three months searching for his 24-year-old son, Daniel Robinson, who went missing after leaving a work site in the desert in his Jeep Renegade on June 23.

Robinson, who lives in South Carolina, hired an independent investigator and assembled a volunteer search team when he says he felt the police weren't making progress in the investigation. He also says he failed to get the amount of media coverage he believed the case needed. The case was reported by the local media as early as July 9.
Robinson said he sympathizes with the family of Gabby Petito, whose remains were recovered Sunday after she disappeared while exploring parks in Wyoming prompting a highly publicized search.

Still, Robinson said it's "hurtful" to see a young White woman's case met with more urgency and national attention than his son, who is Black.
"You wish you lived in a world where everything was equal but it's really not equal," Robinson told CNN.

Do you have a son yourself? What do you suppose he would think of you if he read your comments on this thread?
 

thebeave

Veteran Member
So on the subject of "missing white male", I was browsing Reddit today and this came up:

https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/...medium=android_app&utm_source=share&context=3

Assuming that the link works, it will bring you to an interesting comment thread where people might start to explain at least some of the discrepancies.

Essentially the urge to fuck off and tell nobody is a reasonably widespread phenomena. I expect that there is a similar difference seen in resolve to execute that manifests in a lot of "dads who went out for a pack", that is not similarly reflected by women.

It's still an attrocious thing that concern is not well distributed among victims.

That was an interesting read. I'll admit I've had similar thoughts off and on over the years, but I think I'm too chicken to actually "disappear". That happened to the dad of a classmate of mine in high school, though. Her father (a prominent and respected dentist and citizen of the town) drove to the North Coast of California for a solo trip to the beach (or so he claimed). When he didn't return home, cops were called and they discovered his car along side the road and his day pack on the beach. They searched a bit but came up with nothing, and assumed he drowned and got swept out to sea. The family grieves and eventually moves on with their lives. A couple of years go by, and then someone from my town goes to Arizona for a vacation and sees him performing in a town play one night. Soon, all hell breaks loose. He had always loved acting, but couldn't support his family on an actor's salary so he bailed. So weird. He had several kids, all very nice, well adjusted and popular.
 

Bronzeage

Super Moderator
Staff member
A short, but true story about white male who was found, but never went missing:

In Louisiana, the month of March is mid spring. Two young boys were playing in a wooded area near their home when they discovered a human skull. The police were called and an investigation began. There was a blue nylon rope tied in a noose, hanging from a branch above the scene. The skeleton had been scattered by animals, but the man's wallet was still in the pants pocket. It contained a paycheck stub from late December. Not the previous December, but a year previous. The stub was from a large grocery store which bordered the wooded area. The detectives went to the store. The man was 22 years old and was last seen after the store Christmas party. The loading dock had a spool of blue nylon rope, similar to that found in the tree. The store manager assume he had quit without notice. The man's home address was an apartment which was in walking distance from the store. The apartment belonged to a young couple and the man had been sleeping on their couch. They had not seen him since him since Christmas the previous year. His small collection of possessions were still there, but they assumed he had gone back to the city of Lafayette, where his family lived. The man's family had not heard from him in several years and had no idea where he had been.

The detective wrote in his report that the man committed suicide, most likely because he thought no one cared about him.
 

blastula

Contributor
In another thread, someone was very upset that missing males don't get the same coverage as missing white females. So, the purpose of this thread is to discuss Brian Laundrie who went missing. It's possible in theory that someone killed him. I'm just saying...

I didn't pay attention to this till the police bodycam video came across my feed a few days ago, and I started watching and ended up watching the whole thing. From that video, I wondered whether it could have been a self defense situation, because she was the one that was going to be charged for assault. ICYMI, they were stopped for driving erratically in Utah. From their own accounts, she did hit him while he was driving and also earlier in the day, and he had visible marks on his face and arms. The police even talked to a witness on the phone who had witnessed the earlier altercation, and said the woman was the aggressor. So, the police were considering charging her alone, but ultimately decided not to and just to ask them to spend the night apart. The police were exceedingly accommodating to them, so polite and generous. They made arrangements to get the guy a room for the night, to be covered by the local women's shelter. She was to take the van on her own.

Anyway, she was very anxious and crying and did seem like she could have mental health issues, and maybe she could have been the abuser. She was apologetic about what she did to him. He also came off anxious, but less so, and he put it to having police lights flash behind him. They were both very cooperative and mild mannered and blabby, more so than any attorney would advise. They admitted way too much.

So, I was wondering at first whether maybe she might have attacked him one day and he was defending himself and it got out of hand.
/
BUT THEN, a couple of days ago, it was reported there was another 911 call on that same day (8/12) of the stop, and this caller said he saw the guy slapping the woman several times. And then another story came out that a diner at a Wyoming restaurant recalled seeing Brian arguing aggressively with a waitress there on 8/27, 2 days before Gabby was last heard from. And there are reports now that friends of the couple say they had a rocky relationship, he was controlling and jealous.

It's been like a Dateline episode where they bury the lede of all the obvious incriminating evidence until the end. I mean as to motive, he always obviously killed her or at least knew what happened to her. But now I suspect her anxiety on display during the stop could be because he made her like that.

Anyway, fuck this guy. He is probably hiding out, hope the crocs get him, if he is even in the woods, which could be a diversion.

I wonder how the UT police feel now about how they handled it. Probably nothing they could have done to change things though.
 
In another thread, someone was very upset that missing males don't get the same coverage as missing white females. So, the purpose of this thread is to discuss Brian Laundrie who went missing. It's possible in theory that someone killed him. I'm just saying...

I didn't pay attention to this till the police bodycam video came across my feed a few days ago, and I started watching and ended up watching the whole thing. From that video, I wondered whether it could have been a self defense situation, because she was the one that was going to be charged for assault. ICYMI, they were stopped for driving erratically in Utah. From their own accounts, she did hit him while he was driving and also earlier in the day, and he had visible marks on his face and arms. The police even talked to a witness on the phone who had witnessed the earlier altercation, and said the woman was the aggressor. So, the police were considering charging her alone, but ultimately decided not to and just to ask them to spend the night apart. The police were exceedingly accommodating to them, so polite and generous. They made arrangements to get the guy a room for the night, to be covered by the local women's shelter. She was to take the van on her own.

Anyway, she was very anxious and crying and did seem like she could have mental health issues, and maybe she could have been the abuser. She was acapologetic about what she did to him. He also come off anxious, less so, and he put it to having police lights flash behind him. They were both very cooperative and blabby, more so than any attorney would advise. They admitted way too much.

So, I was wondering whether maybe she might have attacked him one day and he was defending himself and it got out of hand.

BUT, then a couple of days ago, it was reported there was another 911 call on that same day of the stop, and this caller said he saw the guy had slapped the woman several times. And then there was another story that a diner at a Wyoming restaurant recalled seeing Brian arguing aggressively with a waitress there on 8/27, 2 days before Gabby was last heard from. And there are reports now that friends of the couple say they had a rocky relationship, he was controlling and jealous.

It's been like a Dateline episode where the bury the lede of all the obvious incriminating evidence until the end. Now I suspect her anxiety on display during the stop could be because he made her like that.

Anyway, fuck this guy. He is probably hiding out, hope the crocs get him, if he is even in the woods, which could be a diversion.

I wonder how the UT police feel now about how they handled it. Probably nothing they could have done to change things though.

You know a lot of things are possible. We're talking Utah. So maybe the police are very conservative MRAs who automatically took his side. Or maybe they were very just and she actually was at fault. It's possible he was defending himself in some situation, leading to things getting out of hand, or it is possible he wanted revenge and killed her. It's very unlikely but still possible she stormed off at some point and then a third party took advantage of her. A woman being alone in a park (or whatever) is a big target by predator types. Forensics should answer that question very quickly. We don't have that information though it seems very unlikely because it requires a big coincidence. It's also possible that the fiance went to pray in the swamp and an alligator ate him. So maybe he's not hiding out at all. Neighbors recently claimed something about his parents and him leaving days ago in a camper and so maybe they supplied him and he's up in Alaska. Maybe he starved to death in the woods. It isn't 100% certain based on physical evidence we have access to that he killed her, let alone that it was murder as opposed to some other criminal conviction or other. Perhaps that will change very shortly.
 

jab

Veteran Member
I disagree that police are useless and only look for missing people from wealthy families. It IS true that fairly often, when the missing person is a teenager or very young adult, there is a greater presumption that the missing person is a runaway (as if that meant they were less likely to be in danger). Missing children and vulnerable adults garner a lot of local attention. So do missing boaters, hunters and fishermen and snow mobilers. Less often missing hikers in my corner of the state but more so in larger wilderness areas. Most such cases only get local or sometimes regional attention

Note: I live in a small city (25K) surrounded by smaller towns but mostly farmland, some forested area, prairies, lakes and rivers. The nearest large metropolitan area is more than 100 miles away.

Yes, what the police suspect to be the situation plays a big role in the sort of search that's mounted.

The police generally only put in much effort when it's someone they suspect is in danger and not due to their own criminal activities. (Which means missing prostitutes don't get looked for--but to a considerable degree this is because it's basically futile. If it was a serial killer in the car rather than a normal john the chance of catching him is basically zero other than through his screwing up. Throwing a lot of effort into a hopeless case isn't a good use of resources.)

um, re serial killers of prostitutes: examine the case of Robert Pickton--On the Farm is a pretty good book
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
I disagree that police are useless and only look for missing people from wealthy families. It IS true that fairly often, when the missing person is a teenager or very young adult, there is a greater presumption that the missing person is a runaway (as if that meant they were less likely to be in danger). Missing children and vulnerable adults garner a lot of local attention. So do missing boaters, hunters and fishermen and snow mobilers. Less often missing hikers in my corner of the state but more so in larger wilderness areas. Most such cases only get local or sometimes regional attention

Note: I live in a small city (25K) surrounded by smaller towns but mostly farmland, some forested area, prairies, lakes and rivers. The nearest large metropolitan area is more than 100 miles away.

Yes, what the police suspect to be the situation plays a big role in the sort of search that's mounted.

The police generally only put in much effort when it's someone they suspect is in danger and not due to their own criminal activities. (Which means missing prostitutes don't get looked for--but to a considerable degree this is because it's basically futile. If it was a serial killer in the car rather than a normal john the chance of catching him is basically zero other than through his screwing up. Throwing a lot of effort into a hopeless case isn't a good use of resources.)

Everything is hopeless if you don’t try.

Resources aren't infinite.

Serial killers get lots of press but they are relatively rare. Still, where there are suspicions of a serial killer at work, it’s pretty important to devote redirected time catching them, don’t you think?

Maybe I’m reading you wrong but it seems as though you also don’t think prostitutes’ murders need investigating?

It has nothing to do with value, it has to do with capability. If a streetwalker disappears chances are there is nothing to go on.

And I’m not sure why you jumped to prostitutes here?

Because so many of those disappeared women are prostitutes.

Teens/young adults who are missing are often runaways (which dies carry danger) or are blowing off steam or staying with friends and come home on their own. But obviously that’s not always the case. Children who are missing sometimes have wandered off but are more likely to have been taken by a noncustodial parent or other family member. Sometimes they have been kidnapped by strangers and in any case because they are children certainly their disappearances need investigating.

Note that you're showing that the vast majority of those cases are nothing. Again, it comes down to resources.
 
Loren Pechtel said:
Because so many of those disappeared women are prostitutes.

At first glance, this odd claim probably seems irrelevant to the thread. However, let's go up one higher level of categorization: from prostitute to sex criminal. How many missing men and woman are involved in sex crimes? Even up another level to simply suspected of criminal activity, i.e. suspects. Now suddenly we're in op territory. How many adult males vs females that are missing are criminal suspects? How many suspected victims of crimes?
 

Toni

Contributor
Everything is hopeless if you don’t try.

Resources aren't infinite.

Serial killers get lots of press but they are relatively rare. Still, where there are suspicions of a serial killer at work, it’s pretty important to devote redirected time catching them, don’t you think?

Maybe I’m reading you wrong but it seems as though you also don’t think prostitutes’ murders need investigating?

It has nothing to do with value, it has to do with capability. If a streetwalker disappears chances are there is nothing to go on.

And I’m not sure why you jumped to prostitutes here?

Because so many of those disappeared women are prostitutes.

Teens/young adults who are missing are often runaways (which dies carry danger) or are blowing off steam or staying with friends and come home on their own. But obviously that’s not always the case. Children who are missing sometimes have wandered off but are more likely to have been taken by a noncustodial parent or other family member. Sometimes they have been kidnapped by strangers and in any case because they are children certainly their disappearances need investigating.

Note that you're showing that the vast majority of those cases are nothing. Again, it comes down to resources.

Teenage runaways are not 'nothing.' In fact, quite a large number of them end up in very dangerous situations that they did not anticipate. AND quite a number of them are runaways because they were already living in dangerous situations with their families: their family was the dangerous situation.

There is always 'nothing to go on' if you don't look for it. Teenagers, young adults and prostitutes are all people with value--as much value as a white male banker, for instance.

The lack of capability you note seems very much related to the capacity to care about teenagers and prostitutes and young adults as fellow human beings.
 

Gun Nut

Veteran Member
In another thread, someone was very upset that missing males don't get the same coverage as missing white females. So, the purpose of this thread is to discuss Brian Laundrie who went missing. It's possible in theory that someone killed him. I'm just saying...

I didn't pay attention to this till the police bodycam video came across my feed a few days ago, and I started watching and ended up watching the whole thing. From that video, I wondered whether it could have been a self defense situation, because she was the one that was going to be charged for assault. ICYMI, they were stopped for driving erratically in Utah. From their own accounts, she did hit him while he was driving and also earlier in the day, and he had visible marks on his face and arms. The police even talked to a witness on the phone who had witnessed the earlier altercation, and said the woman was the aggressor. So, the police were considering charging her alone, but ultimately decided not to and just to ask them to spend the night apart. The police were exceedingly accommodating to them, so polite and generous. They made arrangements to get the guy a room for the night, to be covered by the local women's shelter. She was to take the van on her own.

Anyway, she was very anxious and crying and did seem like she could have mental health issues, and maybe she could have been the abuser. She was apologetic about what she did to him. He also came off anxious, but less so, and he put it to having police lights flash behind him. They were both very cooperative and mild mannered and blabby, more so than any attorney would advise. They admitted way too much.

So, I was wondering at first whether maybe she might have attacked him one day and he was defending himself and it got out of hand.
/
BUT THEN, a couple of days ago, it was reported there was another 911 call on that same day (8/12) of the stop, and this caller said he saw the guy slapping the woman several times. And then another story came out that a diner at a Wyoming restaurant recalled seeing Brian arguing aggressively with a waitress there on 8/27, 2 days before Gabby was last heard from. And there are reports now that friends of the couple say they had a rocky relationship, he was controlling and jealous.

It's been like a Dateline episode where they bury the lede of all the obvious incriminating evidence until the end. I mean as to motive, he always obviously killed her or at least knew what happened to her. But now I suspect her anxiety on display during the stop could be because he made her like that.

Anyway, fuck this guy. He is probably hiding out, hope the crocs get him, if he is even in the woods, which could be a diversion.

I wonder how the UT police feel now about how they handled it. Probably nothing they could have done to change things though.

I also paid no attention until the bodycam video ended up trending on youtube. I watched the whole thing... it was fascinating to me.
The biggest problem I had with what I observed about the male was that he was WAY too interested in establishing and maintaining rapport with the cops. It was too much like how a psychopathic killer might engage the cops. I put myself in their position and at some point during the 50 minute contact with police, I certainly would have started turning on the cops and demanding they charge or release. When the cops were talking about arresting his girlfriend for DV, his reaction was not appropriate... is was too "I understand your challenges mr. police officer" and not enough, "the HELL you are - I'll have your fucking job and sue your entire department".
So the male is either a psychopathic killer, or way too much of a hippy to even consider being a killer.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Loren Pechtel said:
Because so many of those disappeared women are prostitutes.

At first glance, this odd claim probably seems irrelevant to the thread. However, let's go up one higher level of categorization: from prostitute to sex criminal. How many missing men and woman are involved in sex crimes? Even up another level to simply suspected of criminal activity, i.e. suspects. Now suddenly we're in op territory. How many adult males vs females that are missing are criminal suspects? How many suspected victims of crimes?

AFIAK everywhere in the US streetwalking is a crime. They are criminals. Criminals tend to get into conflict with other criminals.

Also, because they are criminals they tend to act from the shadows, avoiding surveillance systems. In hiding their activities they also hide the identity of whoever picked them up, giving the police basically nothing to go on in trying to hunt down their killers.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Teens/young adults who are missing are often runaways (which dies carry danger) or are blowing off steam or staying with friends and come home on their own. But obviously that’s not always the case. Children who are missing sometimes have wandered off but are more likely to have been taken by a noncustodial parent or other family member. Sometimes they have been kidnapped by strangers and in any case because they are children certainly their disappearances need investigating.

Note that you're showing that the vast majority of those cases are nothing. Again, it comes down to resources.

Teenage runaways are not 'nothing.' In fact, quite a large number of them end up in very dangerous situations that they did not anticipate. AND quite a number of them are runaways because they were already living in dangerous situations with their families: their family was the dangerous situation.

There is always 'nothing to go on' if you don't look for it. Teenagers, young adults and prostitutes are all people with value--as much value as a white male banker, for instance.

The lack of capability you note seems very much related to the capacity to care about teenagers and prostitutes and young adults as fellow human beings.

Most of them come home on their own. Any effort spent looking for such people produces no useful results. The police looking for them won't change the danger they're in.

Police resources should be allocated based on the severity of the situation * the chance of success.

In practice this means that when the chance of success is minimal they aren't going to spend appreciable effort. This has nothing to do with the nature of the victims, it has to do with reality.

Serial killers get caught because they slip up, or because technology changes. Otherwise the chance of catching them is about zero. (For example, DNA. It solved a bunch of cold cases. Now genetic genealogy is solving some more--they had the DNA but nothing to match it to--now they're figuring out who by matching it to relatives.)
 

Arctish

Contributor
Teenage runaways are not 'nothing.' In fact, quite a large number of them end up in very dangerous situations that they did not anticipate. AND quite a number of them are runaways because they were already living in dangerous situations with their families: their family was the dangerous situation.

There is always 'nothing to go on' if you don't look for it. Teenagers, young adults and prostitutes are all people with value--as much value as a white male banker, for instance.

The lack of capability you note seems very much related to the capacity to care about teenagers and prostitutes and young adults as fellow human beings.

Most of them come home on their own. Any effort spent looking for such people produces no useful results. The police looking for them won't change the danger they're in.

Police resources should be allocated based on the severity of the situation * the chance of success.

In practice this means that when the chance of success is minimal they aren't going to spend appreciable effort. This has nothing to do with the nature of the victims, it has to do with reality.

Serial killers get caught because they slip up, or because technology changes. Otherwise the chance of catching them is about zero. (For example, DNA. It solved a bunch of cold cases. Now genetic genealogy is solving some more--they had the DNA but nothing to match it to--now they're figuring out who by matching it to relatives.)

So if white men are going missing on hiking trails in Nevada we shouldn't expend resources looking for them because they probably went into the wilderness of their own accord and don't want to be disturbed, or it's likely they're male prostitutes and are either running from their fellow criminals or were murdered for being whores?

I disagree.

I think the police should always make a good faith effort to find missing persons and not presume it's a waste of time or that the person isn't worth the effort. And if there's any hint of foul play, they should devote even more resources to the task.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Teenage runaways are not 'nothing.' In fact, quite a large number of them end up in very dangerous situations that they did not anticipate. AND quite a number of them are runaways because they were already living in dangerous situations with their families: their family was the dangerous situation.

There is always 'nothing to go on' if you don't look for it. Teenagers, young adults and prostitutes are all people with value--as much value as a white male banker, for instance.

The lack of capability you note seems very much related to the capacity to care about teenagers and prostitutes and young adults as fellow human beings.

Most of them come home on their own. Any effort spent looking for such people produces no useful results. The police looking for them won't change the danger they're in.

Police resources should be allocated based on the severity of the situation * the chance of success.

In practice this means that when the chance of success is minimal they aren't going to spend appreciable effort. This has nothing to do with the nature of the victims, it has to do with reality.

Serial killers get caught because they slip up, or because technology changes. Otherwise the chance of catching them is about zero. (For example, DNA. It solved a bunch of cold cases. Now genetic genealogy is solving some more--they had the DNA but nothing to match it to--now they're figuring out who by matching it to relatives.)

So if white men are going missing on hiking trails in Nevada we shouldn't expend resources looking for them because they probably went into the wilderness of their own accord and don't want to be disturbed, or it's likely they're male prostitutes and are either running from their fellow criminals or were murdered for being whores?

I disagree.

I think the police should always make a good faith effort to find missing persons and not presume it's a waste of time or that the person isn't worth the effort. And if there's any hint of foul play, they should devote even more resources to the task.

If someone goes missing in the wilderness there most certainly is a search--for the person, not for evidence of their murder. It's a useful thing--they're often found.

How about making a better comparison.
 

Arctish

Contributor
So if white men are going missing on hiking trails in Nevada we shouldn't expend resources looking for them because they probably went into the wilderness of their own accord and don't want to be disturbed, or it's likely they're male prostitutes and are either running from their fellow criminals or were murdered for being whores?

I disagree.

I think the police should always make a good faith effort to find missing persons and not presume it's a waste of time or that the person isn't worth the effort. And if there's any hint of foul play, they should devote even more resources to the task.

If someone goes missing in the wilderness there most certainly is a search--for the person, not for evidence of their murder. It's a useful thing--they're often found.

How about making a better comparison.

Better in what way?

I believe there should always be a search or an investigation when a person is reported missing. The cops should never just decide beforehand that investigating is pointless or that the person isn't worth all that effort, which is what you are insinuating.

The race, gender, and occupation of the missing person should not determine how much effort the authorities put into locating them. Presuming a missing person knowingly and willingly put themselves in danger _might_ be useful in the investigation _if_ it has been established they were engaged in risky behavior at the time of their disappearance. But even if they were, that shouldn't diminish or prevent a sincere effort to find them, no matter what that risky behavior might have been.
 
Last edited:

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
So if white men are going missing on hiking trails in Nevada we shouldn't expend resources looking for them because they probably went into the wilderness of their own accord and don't want to be disturbed, or it's likely they're male prostitutes and are either running from their fellow criminals or were murdered for being whores?

I disagree.

I think the police should always make a good faith effort to find missing persons and not presume it's a waste of time or that the person isn't worth the effort. And if there's any hint of foul play, they should devote even more resources to the task.

If someone goes missing in the wilderness there most certainly is a search--for the person, not for evidence of their murder. It's a useful thing--they're often found.

How about making a better comparison.

Better in what way?

I believe there should always be a search or an investigation when a person is reported missing. The cops should never just decide beforehand that investigating is pointless or that the person isn't worth all that effort, which is what you are insinuating.

The race, gender, and occupation of the missing person should not determine how much effort the authorities put into locating them. Presuming a missing person knowingly and willingly put themselves in danger _might_ be useful in the investigation _if_ it has been established they were engaged in risky behavior at the time of their disappearance. But even if they were, that shouldn't diminish or prevent a sincere effort to find them, no matter what that risky behavior might have been.

What you're not getting is that it's not about the value of the person, but the chance of success.

You chase what leads you have. When the disappearance is related to their own criminal activity the chances are you have basically zero leads. Check if there are any cameras or the like, if not you wait for someone to talk or someone to slip up and get caught by some other means.

You don't solve a crime by putting in x amount of effort. You solve a crime by running down the leads until you find one that points to the perpetrator. There is no guarantee that there is such a lead.
 

Arctish

Contributor
Better in what way?

I believe there should always be a search or an investigation when a person is reported missing. The cops should never just decide beforehand that investigating is pointless or that the person isn't worth all that effort, which is what you are insinuating.

The race, gender, and occupation of the missing person should not determine how much effort the authorities put into locating them. Presuming a missing person knowingly and willingly put themselves in danger _might_ be useful in the investigation _if_ it has been established they were engaged in risky behavior at the time of their disappearance. But even if they were, that shouldn't diminish or prevent a sincere effort to find them, no matter what that risky behavior might have been.

What you're not getting is that it's not about the value of the person, but the chance of success.

You chase what leads you have. When the disappearance is related to their own criminal activity the chances are you have basically zero leads. Check if there are any cameras or the like, if not you wait for someone to talk or someone to slip up and get caught by some other means.

You don't solve a crime by putting in x amount of effort. You solve a crime by running down the leads until you find one that points to the perpetrator. There is no guarantee that there is such a lead.

True, there's no guarantee of success. That is true even when there are solid leads for investigators to follow. But you appear to be subtly shifting the goalposts here to justify assuming a few conclusions you made about missing persons here.

First off, you have presented no data to support your claim that "so many of those disappeared women are prostitutes", and second, you have presented no data to support the claim that when prostitutes go missing "chances are there is nothing to go on".

Prostitutes are as likely to have cell phones as everyone else. They have friends, favorite grocery stores and restaurants, favorite places to do business, etc. They are as likely to be seen on security camera videos as non-prostitutes.

I see no reason to assume a search for a missing prostitute is less likely to succeed than a search for a missing non-prostitute. And there is no _good_ reason to be mingy with resources when the missing person earned a living via the sex trade.

The hunters and hikers who get lost in the wilderness are pretty damn hard to find. The missing boaters and commercial fisherman are even harder to locate. Why are you assuming finding missing prostitutes is hardest of all? Are you assuming that they've been murdered? Because if so, that makes their disappearance a very serious crime that warrants a helluva lot more investigative resources than finding some random guy who tried to create a shortcut in a wild area.
 

Jarhyn

Contributor
Better in what way?

I believe there should always be a search or an investigation when a person is reported missing. The cops should never just decide beforehand that investigating is pointless or that the person isn't worth all that effort, which is what you are insinuating.

The race, gender, and occupation of the missing person should not determine how much effort the authorities put into locating them. Presuming a missing person knowingly and willingly put themselves in danger _might_ be useful in the investigation _if_ it has been established they were engaged in risky behavior at the time of their disappearance. But even if they were, that shouldn't diminish or prevent a sincere effort to find them, no matter what that risky behavior might have been.

What you're not getting is that it's not about the value of the person, but the chance of success.

You chase what leads you have. When the disappearance is related to their own criminal activity the chances are you have basically zero leads. Check if there are any cameras or the like, if not you wait for someone to talk or someone to slip up and get caught by some other means.

You don't solve a crime by putting in x amount of effort. You solve a crime by running down the leads until you find one that points to the perpetrator. There is no guarantee that there is such a lead.

True, there's no guarantee of success. That is true even when there are solid leads for investigators to follow. But you appear to be subtly shifting the goalposts here to justify assuming a few conclusions you made about missing persons here.

First off, you have presented no data to support your claim that "so many of those disappeared women are prostitutes", and second, you have presented no data to support the claim that when prostitutes go missing "chances are there is nothing to go on".

Prostitutes are as likely to have cell phones as everyone else. They have friends, favorite grocery stores and restaurants, favorite places to do business, etc. They are as likely to be seen on security camera videos as non-prostitutes.

I see no reason to assume a search for a missing prostitute is less likely to succeed than a search for a missing non-prostitute. And there is no _good_ reason to be mingy with resources when the missing person earned a living via the sex trade.

The hunters and hikers who get lost in the wilderness are pretty damn hard to find. The missing boaters and commercial fisherman are even harder to locate. Why are you assuming finding missing prostitutes is hardest of all? Are you assuming that they've been murdered? Because if so, that makes their disappearance a very serious crime that warrants a helluva lot more investigative resources than finding some random guy who tried to create a shortcut in a wild area.

I think the biggest issue with prostitution is that business happens quite often where there is little oversight, no vetting, combined with the fact that prostitutes will quite often get into strangers' cars.

I agree that anyone who gets into someone else's car willingly, without someone recording details (and note that cars for this purpose used by a smart killer will not be easy to tie to a killer), there's just going to be a HUGE uphill battle to get any leads.

It is absolutely the case that people should be more concerned that there are humans preying on vulnerable humans. The issue is that some people think "they're only prostitutes", perhaps not openly or even consciously, and then that involvement of effort to an already hard problem becomes "easy" to ignore.

I hope for Lauren's sake that he knows well how to force himself to sleep; I know I would not be able sleep easily at night knowing I had handwaved away deaths in such a horrid manner.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
First off, you have presented no data to support your claim that "so many of those disappeared women are prostitutes", and second, you have presented no data to support the claim that when prostitutes go missing "chances are there is nothing to go on".

Prostitutes are as likely to have cell phones as everyone else. They have friends, favorite grocery stores and restaurants, favorite places to do business, etc. They are as likely to be seen on security camera videos as non-prostitutes.

If they go missing when not actually being prostitutes you're right. But the usual scenario is they are picked up by a bad guy. At that point they are probably by their own choice out of sight of security cameras and the phone is going to get turned off.

I see no reason to assume a search for a missing prostitute is less likely to succeed than a search for a missing non-prostitute. And there is no _good_ reason to be mingy with resources when the missing person earned a living via the sex trade.

You're being awfully blind here.

The hunters and hikers who get lost in the wilderness are pretty damn hard to find. The missing boaters and commercial fisherman are even harder to locate. Why are you assuming finding missing prostitutes is hardest of all? Are you assuming that they've been murdered? Because if so, that makes their disappearance a very serious crime that warrants a helluva lot more investigative resources than finding some random guy who tried to create a shortcut in a wild area.

The issue is you have no trail to follow.

Somebody missing in the wilderness, you normally have a good idea of what they were planning. It is very unlikely they are trying to avoid being found--a good search & rescue guy can look at the situation and make pretty good guesses of what somebody in distress would do in trying to get help. And note that most of the search effort is usually by volunteers.

The missing prostitute, however, was in all probability snatched by someone who will be seeking to obscure their trail. Generally there will be zero information as to where they went. Phones certainly can be traced until you're too far off the grid, but the bad guys know that and will turn off or destroy the phone. Once it's off the trail goes cold. Think anyone's going to get the plate of the car she got into? And even if they do how do you know that's the bad guy rather than just a previous client?
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
I think the biggest issue with prostitution is that business happens quite often where there is little oversight, no vetting, combined with the fact that prostitutes will quite often get into strangers' cars.

I agree that anyone who gets into someone else's car willingly, without someone recording details (and note that cars for this purpose used by a smart killer will not be easy to tie to a killer), there's just going to be a HUGE uphill battle to get any leads.

It is absolutely the case that people should be more concerned that there are humans preying on vulnerable humans. The issue is that some people think "they're only prostitutes", perhaps not openly or even consciously, and then that involvement of effort to an already hard problem becomes "easy" to ignore.

I hope for Lauren's sake that he knows well how to force himself to sleep; I know I would not be able sleep easily at night knowing I had handwaved away deaths in such a horrid manner.

Your first two paragraphs explain exactly why I said what I did. It's not a matter of value, it's a matter of capability.

If there is no detectable connection between killer and victim, no slip-up at the time and nobody talks the chances of getting caught are about zero.
 

Jarhyn

Contributor
I think the biggest issue with prostitution is that business happens quite often where there is little oversight, no vetting, combined with the fact that prostitutes will quite often get into strangers' cars.

I agree that anyone who gets into someone else's car willingly, without someone recording details (and note that cars for this purpose used by a smart killer will not be easy to tie to a killer), there's just going to be a HUGE uphill battle to get any leads.

It is absolutely the case that people should be more concerned that there are humans preying on vulnerable humans. The issue is that some people think "they're only prostitutes", perhaps not openly or even consciously, and then that involvement of effort to an already hard problem becomes "easy" to ignore.

I hope for Lauren's sake that he knows well how to force himself to sleep; I know I would not be able sleep easily at night knowing I had handwaved away deaths in such a horrid manner.

Your first two paragraphs explain exactly why I said what I did. It's not a matter of value, it's a matter of capability.

If there is no detectable connection between killer and victim, no slip-up at the time and nobody talks the chances of getting caught are about zero.

The thing is, you claim it's a "waste of resources". It's not. It's a proper use of resources that they just won't put in because they don't think the victims are worth it.

Every victim is worth every resource it takes, even if it's hard. Sometimes especially when it's hard.

Of course part of it comes from the fact of how the police are already misusing their resources to shut down sites that enable safer prostitution practices.

The issue here is that it's fucking disgusting to say "these people are expensive to care about", when it's just as expensive to waste so much money on looking for rich white chicks rather than just investigating their romantic partner.

The unstated part of your statement is "and they just don't matter enough to actually put in that effort."
 

Arctish

Contributor
If they go missing when not actually being prostitutes you're right. But the usual scenario is they are picked up by a bad guy. At that point they are probably by their own choice out of sight of security cameras and the phone is going to get turned off.

What makes you think a prostitute would turn off his cell phone?

Prostitutes use their phones to hook up with clients and get paid. I can understand why they'd turn off the sound, but turning off the phone would impact their earnings and might get them in trouble with their pimps. Plus, it makes it harder for them to call for help in an emergency, seeing as how they'd have to wait for the phone to reboot.

Do you have actual evidence they voluntarily turn off their phones, or are you just making stuff up?

You're being awfully blind here.

The hunters and hikers who get lost in the wilderness are pretty damn hard to find. The missing boaters and commercial fisherman are even harder to locate. Why are you assuming finding missing prostitutes is hardest of all? Are you assuming that they've been murdered? Because if so, that makes their disappearance a very serious crime that warrants a helluva lot more investigative resources than finding some random guy who tried to create a shortcut in a wild area.

The issue is you have no trail to follow.

Somebody missing in the wilderness, you normally have a good idea of what they were planning. It is very unlikely they are trying to avoid being found--a good search & rescue guy can look at the situation and make pretty good guesses of what somebody in distress would do in trying to get help. And note that most of the search effort is usually by volunteers.

The missing prostitute, however, was in all probability snatched by someone who will be seeking to obscure their trail. Generally there will be zero information as to where they went. Phones certainly can be traced until you're too far off the grid, but the bad guys know that and will turn off or destroy the phone. Once it's off the trail goes cold. Think anyone's going to get the plate of the car she got into? And even if they do how do you know that's the bad guy rather than just a previous client?

No, the issue is your baseless assertions about when and why police make a sincere effort to find missing persons. You aren't excusing the failure to find a missing person, you're excusing not even trying. And you immediately started talking about prostitutes as though you think any woman who is reported missing is most likely a whore.

Well, this thread was started in response to a report of a missing man. The guy is suspected of being a murderer. Considering how typical it is for murderers to be men, and how typical it is for murderers to go into hiding, would it be fair to assume that missing men are typically murderers?
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
I think the biggest issue with prostitution is that business happens quite often where there is little oversight, no vetting, combined with the fact that prostitutes will quite often get into strangers' cars.

I agree that anyone who gets into someone else's car willingly, without someone recording details (and note that cars for this purpose used by a smart killer will not be easy to tie to a killer), there's just going to be a HUGE uphill battle to get any leads.

It is absolutely the case that people should be more concerned that there are humans preying on vulnerable humans. The issue is that some people think "they're only prostitutes", perhaps not openly or even consciously, and then that involvement of effort to an already hard problem becomes "easy" to ignore.

I hope for Lauren's sake that he knows well how to force himself to sleep; I know I would not be able sleep easily at night knowing I had handwaved away deaths in such a horrid manner.

Your first two paragraphs explain exactly why I said what I did. It's not a matter of value, it's a matter of capability.

If there is no detectable connection between killer and victim, no slip-up at the time and nobody talks the chances of getting caught are about zero.

The thing is, you claim it's a "waste of resources". It's not. It's a proper use of resources that they just won't put in because they don't think the victims are worth it.

Every victim is worth every resource it takes, even if it's hard. Sometimes especially when it's hard.

Of course part of it comes from the fact of how the police are already misusing their resources to shut down sites that enable safer prostitution practices.

The issue here is that it's fucking disgusting to say "these people are expensive to care about", when it's just as expensive to waste so much money on looking for rich white chicks rather than just investigating their romantic partner.

The unstated part of your statement is "and they just don't matter enough to actually put in that effort."

Resources aren't infinite.

You'll do a lot more good putting the police time on crimes that can be solved rather than ones that are almost certainly futile.
 

Arctish

Contributor
The thing is, you claim it's a "waste of resources". It's not. It's a proper use of resources that they just won't put in because they don't think the victims are worth it.

Every victim is worth every resource it takes, even if it's hard. Sometimes especially when it's hard.

Of course part of it comes from the fact of how the police are already misusing their resources to shut down sites that enable safer prostitution practices.

The issue here is that it's fucking disgusting to say "these people are expensive to care about", when it's just as expensive to waste so much money on looking for rich white chicks rather than just investigating their romantic partner.

The unstated part of your statement is "and they just don't matter enough to actually put in that effort."

Resources aren't infinite.

You'll do a lot more good putting the police time on crimes that can be solved rather than ones that are almost certainly futile.

You have no idea which ones are almost certainly futile and which ones can be solved unless and until you make a good faith effort to investigate.

It's the same with reports of rape and sexual assault. The FBI agents who blew off the statements gymnasts made about Larry Nassar were a huge part of the problem. The failure to investigate is what enabled that guy to keep on molesting little kids.

A preliminary investigation might indicate that a missing person case lacks actionable leads. That's unfortunate but acceptable. But not investigating a report at all? Not making a sincere effort to find a missing person? That's unacceptable.
 
Fox News said:
dog-bounty-hunter-fox-news-digital-for-newsletter.jpg
Good morning and welcome to Fox News First. Here's what you need to know as you start your day …

Dog the Bounty Hunter takes Fox News on Brian Laundrie tipster trial to campground tied to parents

Duane "Dog the Bounty Hunter" Chapman is investigating a tip that alleges Brian Laundrie, the fugitive fiancé of Gabby Petito, went into a Florida campground 75 miles away with his parents in early September — but only two of them were seen leaving.
https://www.foxnews.com/us/brian-la...-bounty-hunter-florida-campground-family-home
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
The thing is, you claim it's a "waste of resources". It's not. It's a proper use of resources that they just won't put in because they don't think the victims are worth it.

Every victim is worth every resource it takes, even if it's hard. Sometimes especially when it's hard.

Of course part of it comes from the fact of how the police are already misusing their resources to shut down sites that enable safer prostitution practices.

The issue here is that it's fucking disgusting to say "these people are expensive to care about", when it's just as expensive to waste so much money on looking for rich white chicks rather than just investigating their romantic partner.

The unstated part of your statement is "and they just don't matter enough to actually put in that effort."

Resources aren't infinite.

You'll do a lot more good putting the police time on crimes that can be solved rather than ones that are almost certainly futile.

You have no idea which ones are almost certainly futile and which ones can be solved unless and until you make a good faith effort to investigate.

It's the same with reports of rape and sexual assault. The FBI agents who blew off the statements gymnasts made about Larry Nassar were a huge part of the problem. The failure to investigate is what enabled that guy to keep on molesting little kids.

A preliminary investigation might indicate that a missing person case lacks actionable leads. That's unfortunate but acceptable. But not investigating a report at all? Not making a sincere effort to find a missing person? That's unacceptable.

I'm not saying that no investigation should be done. I'm just saying that in most of the missing-prostitute cases there will be no leads. Even if you somehow found a car she got into that's not evidence that said person is the killer.

I do agree there's a problem with accusations against highly-placed people being ignored. Yes, there will always be crap allegations against such people, but keep track of them anyway even if you do nothing else. When you find one with a lot more allegations than the others you probably have an actual issue.
 

Arctish

Contributor
I'm not saying that no investigation should be done. I'm just saying that in most of the missing-prostitute cases there will be no leads. Even if you somehow found a car she got into that's not evidence that said person is the killer.

No leads? None at all?

Do you have evidence that supports this claim or is it merely your opinion?

I do agree there's a problem with accusations against highly-placed people being ignored. Yes, there will always be crap allegations against such people, but keep track of them anyway even if you do nothing else. When you find one with a lot more allegations than the others you probably have an actual issue.

There's a problem with accusations against middle- and lowly-placed individuals being ignored as well. There is an additional problem of rape kits being untested, and of test results not being entered into databases where it might be useful in investigating other reported crimes. Not to mention the problem of missing women being labeled prostitutes who are then blamed for their own misfortune.

And then there's the problem of cops doing as you suggest - ignoring reported rapes until there are more allegations i.e. more victims.

How many reports of rape does it take to get the cops to investigate the alleged crime? It seems to me the answer should be one, but you appear to be setting the bar a bit higher.

You keep making excuses for the police not doing their jobs when it comes to rape victims and missing persons. Why is that? Do you honestly think it isn't their job to investigate alleged crimes and sudden, unexplained disappearances?
 
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Jarhyn

Contributor
The thing is, you claim it's a "waste of resources". It's not. It's a proper use of resources that they just won't put in because they don't think the victims are worth it.

Every victim is worth every resource it takes, even if it's hard. Sometimes especially when it's hard.

Of course part of it comes from the fact of how the police are already misusing their resources to shut down sites that enable safer prostitution practices.

The issue here is that it's fucking disgusting to say "these people are expensive to care about", when it's just as expensive to waste so much money on looking for rich white chicks rather than just investigating their romantic partner.

The unstated part of your statement is "and they just don't matter enough to actually put in that effort."

Resources aren't infinite.

You'll do a lot more good putting the police time on crimes that can be solved rather than ones that are almost certainly futile.

You have no idea which ones are almost certainly futile and which ones can be solved unless and until you make a good faith effort to investigate.

It's the same with reports of rape and sexual assault. The FBI agents who blew off the statements gymnasts made about Larry Nassar were a huge part of the problem. The failure to investigate is what enabled that guy to keep on molesting little kids.

A preliminary investigation might indicate that a missing person case lacks actionable leads. That's unfortunate but acceptable. But not investigating a report at all? Not making a sincere effort to find a missing person? That's unacceptable.

Not to mention that not every crime that can be solved needs to be. I'm sure a lot of black folks around my town are really tired of police "solving" "easy crimes" in their neighborhood like "driving while black" and "walking while black".

I shit you not, when I called in a noise complaint at 1:00 AM , the Minneapolis Police Department tried to suggest I suggest they were dealing drugs. They tried to coach me into looking for things that everyone in the neighborhood does normally, and then adding those things to the complaint, but in such a shape as to imply a specific criminal intent.

I would rather put police time on every crime to evaluate it, no matter how much of a "pain" they think it is. Maybe then we would see that backlog of rape kits disappear. Plenty of evidence there just sitting on a shelf...
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
You have no idea which ones are almost certainly futile and which ones can be solved unless and until you make a good faith effort to investigate.

It's the same with reports of rape and sexual assault. The FBI agents who blew off the statements gymnasts made about Larry Nassar were a huge part of the problem. The failure to investigate is what enabled that guy to keep on molesting little kids.

A preliminary investigation might indicate that a missing person case lacks actionable leads. That's unfortunate but acceptable. But not investigating a report at all? Not making a sincere effort to find a missing person? That's unacceptable.

Not to mention that not every crime that can be solved needs to be. I'm sure a lot of black folks around my town are really tired of police "solving" "easy crimes" in their neighborhood like "driving while black" and "walking while black".

I shit you not, when I called in a noise complaint at 1:00 AM , the Minneapolis Police Department tried to suggest I suggest they were dealing drugs. They tried to coach me into looking for things that everyone in the neighborhood does normally, and then adding those things to the complaint, but in such a shape as to imply a specific criminal intent.

I would rather put police time on every crime to evaluate it, no matter how much of a "pain" they think it is. Maybe then we would see that backlog of rape kits disappear. Plenty of evidence there just sitting on a shelf...

Tell the legislature to fund it.
 
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