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New (to me) Computer

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
I bought a used HP Mini 5103 on eBay. I intend to use it to run diagnostic and control software to communicate with my BMW.

It is ssssllllloooooooowwww. It has 2 gigs of RAM and according to HP that is the maximum that it can take. I've heard this many times before and the answer was always yes, you can add more RAM and it will work. BTW, this uses the Intel Atom processor.

Do you think more RAM will work in this?

I also intend to upgrade to an SSD in the future too.
 

excreationist

Married mouth-breather
That computer is eleven years old and was the lowest end laptop available. I'm not surprised that it is incredibly slow - even eleven years ago it would have been slow.

Recently I bought a core i5 laptop with 8 Gb of RAM for A$200 though it has some physical damage. You should get a computer with those specs as a minimum.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
My other HP laptop is a good bit older, 8 gigs RAM and an SSD and purrs along quite quickly. I chose the mini because it's small. Trying to work from the driver's side on a 17" laptop in a compact car is is no easy task. I just have four programs I will need to run, all designed for Windows XP.
 

excreationist

Married mouth-breather
For something small maybe get a second hand Surface (with a keyboard that can connect to it) or a tablet.... I think Surface can run Windows. You could search for "small laptop"... there should be some mid-range ones - rather than getting the cheap and nasty ones....
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
I can get an 8 gig sodimm for 28 bucks so I'm going to go that route.

ETA: I'm going to try an SSD first. Just got one for 18 bucks.
 
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barbos

Contributor
You can try putting 4GB module into it. Chances are, it will see 3GB of it. At least that's what happened with my Atom notebook.
CPU is slow but it has 2 cores and 4 threads. These last Atoms are actually 64 bit and but they are locked to 32 bit by BIOS.
in 64 bit you would have seen 4GB memory,
 
Defrag the disc may give you some increase in speed.

Check your start up file and see what's running in the back ground and what can be safely deleted.
 

excreationist

Married mouth-breather
Defrag the disc may give you some increase in speed.

Check your start up file and see what's running in the back ground and what can be safely deleted.
Apparently SSDs should not be defragged: (just in case anyone wanted to)
it can cause unnecessary wear and tear which will reduce its life span. Nevertheless, because of the efficient way in which SSD technology functions, defragmentation to improve performance is not actually required

SSDs have a built-in “time of death”. To keep it simple: An electric effect results from the fact that data can only be written on a storage cell inside the chips between approximately 3.000 and 100.000 times during its lifetime. After that, the cells “forget” new data. Because of this fact – and to prevent certain cells from getting used all the time while others aren´t – the manufacturers use ‘Wear-Leveling-Algorithms’ to distribute data evenly over all cells by the controller.

My teacher in an intermediate computer course told the class about not defragging SSDs.
 

barbos

Contributor
I can get an 8 gig sodimm for 28 bucks
That would be waste of money and gigabytes. As I said, you can see maximum 3-3.5 GB of it.
It appears that you are running WinXP and few tiny programs. In that case 2GB is more than enough.
Atom is just slow, and its graphics is very slow too. Nothing can be done.
Also, i am not sure WinXP can do SMP. If that's the case then it would be basically 800Mhz Pentium 3 computer. (20 year old computer)


....
yep, XP Home does not support SMP, and XP Pro supports only 2 CPUs (Your Atom has 4)
 
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ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
I can get an 8 gig sodimm for 28 bucks
That would be waste of money and gigabytes. As I said, you can see maximum 3-3.5 GB of it.
It appears that you are running WinXP and few tiny programs. In that case 2GB is more than enough.
Atom is just slow, and its graphics is very slow too. Nothing can be done.
Also, i am not sure WinXP can do SMP. If that's the case then it would be basically 800Mhz Pentium 3 computer. (20 year old computer)


....
yep, XP Home does not support SMP, and XP Pro supports only 2 CPUs (Your Atom has 4)
Yes, I did some checking and found that out myself. But thank you for the confirmation. Much appreciated.

I've got a 4 gig sodimm in my warch file on eBay.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
I can get an 8 gig sodimm for 28 bucks
That would be waste of money and gigabytes. As I said, you can see maximum 3-3.5 GB of it.
It appears that you are running WinXP and few tiny programs. In that case 2GB is more than enough.
Atom is just slow, and its graphics is very slow too. Nothing can be done.
Also, i am not sure WinXP can do SMP. If that's the case then it would be basically 800Mhz Pentium 3 computer. (20 year old computer)


....
yep, XP Home does not support SMP, and XP Pro supports only 2 CPUs (Your Atom has 4)
Nope, not running win xp, The diagnostic programs I need to run were designed for win xp. They stopped making e46 BMWs after 2005 model year and that's what these programs are designed to run on.

It came with a fresh install of win 7. I updated it to 10 yesterday out of curiosity and everything seems to run fine, still just as slow though.
 
Defrag the disc may give you some increase in speed.

Check your start up file and see what's running in the back ground and what can be safely deleted.
Apparently SSDs should not be defragged: (just in case anyone wanted to)
it can cause unnecessary wear and tear which will reduce its life span. Nevertheless, because of the efficient way in which SSD technology functions, defragmentation to improve performance is not actually required

SSDs have a built-in “time of death”. To keep it simple: An electric effect results from the fact that data can only be written on a storage cell inside the chips between approximately 3.000 and 100.000 times during its lifetime. After that, the cells “forget” new data. Because of this fact – and to prevent certain cells from getting used all the time while others aren´t – the manufacturers use ‘Wear-Leveling-Algorithms’ to distribute data evenly over all cells by the controller.

My teacher in an intermediate computer course told the class about not defragging SSDs.
ZipHead said he's considering getting and SSD in the future.

I was suggesting defragging the current disc.
 

barbos

Contributor
I mean compared to the 7 install. And yes, it took over a full day for all the updates to install.
You said it came with a fresh install of 7. In my experience fresh install is always followed by few hours of updating, indexing and other useless crap. It's very doubtful that there is an actual difference between 7 and 10 in terms of speed.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
So I got the 4 gig sodimm today. Popped in into the computer and it wouldn't even boot into the bios. That sucks.
 

barbos

Contributor
So I got the 4 gig sodimm today. Popped in into the computer and it wouldn't even boot into the bios. That sucks.
looks like faulty module. If not send it to me, I can use it my Atom (it has 2GB now)

Now I am starting to remember that I had similar troubles with 4GB module in Atom netbook.
I have tried two 4 GB modules. One did not work, another did. Don't know why. The one which did work only 3GB were visible. This is becasue part of the maximum 4GB address space was used by devices.
 
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ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
I was thinking the same thing about being faulty. I'm going to try it out in my other laptop.

Hope you're feeling better, BTW.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Yeah, I'll swap the module with one of the one from my other laptop and see what happens.

I installed the ssd and that kicked up the speed a good bit.
 

Jarhyn

Contributor
Yeah, the biggest bottleneck especially in systems with low memory is swap time, and SSD is an order of magnitude or several faster than spinning media.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Yeah, the biggest bottleneck especially in systems with low memory is swap time, and SSD is an order of magnitude or several faster than spinning media.
Yeah. On the previous install of windows 10, it took a full day to install the updates. On the ssd, it took about six hours.

I tried to copy the original disk using Macrium but but I could not get the new disk to show in windows 10., so I had to restart from scratch.
 

barbos

Contributor
Yeah, the biggest bottleneck especially in systems with low memory is swap time, and SSD is an order of magnitude or several faster than spinning media.
I don't know, active use of SSD for swap is a sure way to kill it. ZRAM is way to go for swap.
 

Jarhyn

Contributor
Yeah, the biggest bottleneck especially in systems with low memory is swap time, and SSD is an order of magnitude or several faster than spinning media.
I don't know, active use of SSD for swap is a sure way to kill it. ZRAM is way to go for swap.
Was. With modern wear levelling and reserved replacement regions, it's not a huge issue. What is certain is that that's where the biggest bottleneck on any RAM starved is going to be
 

barbos

Contributor
You are a couple orders of magnitude low. It is between 10,000 and 100,000k these days
You are mistaken. 100K is for low density SLC memory for firmware chips and such.
High density TLC/QLC chips are 300-500 rewrites. In practice you can achive more because of SLC cache but people do successfully kill SSDs in rather short amount of time.


SSD SAMSUNG 980 MZ-V8V500BW rated for 600 rewrites.

at full speed is just 2 days and it's out. of course full speed is not realistic, so it will take more than 2 days, but it will be dead in one month for sure.
 
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ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
I'm not going to worry about early death of the ssd. Their cheap nowadays and the only purpose of this computer is for diagnostics and module access on my BMW so it's not going to get a lot of use.
 
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