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Parenting Megathread

rousseau

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Congrats!

I always thought sleep regression coincided with growth spurts, so it's not so much a regression per se, but rather the baby has higher metabolic needs (eats more, so consequently wakes more). In the early days we fed our son pretty much any time he cried. Sometimes it'd be something else, but it was rare.
 

Toni

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Sure but physical growth isn’t the only kind of growth spurt that happens. Some kids are better at going back to sleep on their own than others. For my kids, having a very relaxed routine helped get them down. In toddler years, as their need to sleep was shifting, and they were more aware that life went on outside of their bedrooms—and were mobile enough to do something about it, sometimes they had trouble staying in bed—or rather, we had trouble with them popping up wanting another story, drink, cuddle, bathroom and frankly whatever excuse they could come up with. For my kids, it was actually more helpful for doors to their bedroom to be left open so that they could hear the quiet sounds of the adult evening going in—music or television, pages turning in books, quiet conversation or the sounds of dishes being washed and the living room straightened. Nothing too exciting so they really weren’t missing out too much. At different ages, sometimes one of us needed to be very near the bedroom, so they could see or hear us. I would make a big (but very quiet) show of putting away laundry, for example, taking multiple trips past their open doors. And for a couple, I sometimes sat in the floor outside their bedroom, quietly reading, so they could see me and hear me. There was a week ir two with each of them where there was a lot of bounce back to bed routines. We just tried to make it as quiet and as boring —and as matter of fact as possible, it kept the excitement from being fed and didn’t provide any motivation to stay awake to see what the Grownups were up to: just boring stuff…

Which reminds me of when our oldest successfully lobbied for a 10 pm bedtime. He was so excited! And sorely disappointed that there was no special exciting adult magic going on.
 

rousseau

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I was mainly just noting what we found with our infant. IIRC, in the first year they can't really be overfed, a parents main job is pumping them full of milk and transitioning them to solids (flavour window and baby led weaning!). Once they're firmly past one year old the equation changes as their growth slows significantly. Maybe around 9 - 11 months is the time to start nudging them away from night feeds, but at the very least no earlier than 4 months. Opinions will vary.

In my experience the term 'sleep regression' can be pernicious as many parents misunderstand it as 'why won't my baby sleep' when it's really 'my baby is actually just hungry'.
 

rousseau

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Sure but physical growth isn’t the only kind of growth spurt that happens. Some kids are better at going back to sleep on their own than others. For my kids, having a very relaxed routine helped get them down. In toddler years, as their need to sleep was shifting, and they were more aware that life went on outside of their bedrooms—and were mobile enough to do something about it, sometimes they had trouble staying in bed—or rather, we had trouble with them popping up wanting another story, drink, cuddle, bathroom and frankly whatever excuse they could come up with. For my kids, it was actually more helpful for doors to their bedroom to be left open so that they could hear the quiet sounds of the adult evening going in—music or television, pages turning in books, quiet conversation or the sounds of dishes being washed and the living room straightened. Nothing too exciting so they really weren’t missing out too much. At different ages, sometimes one of us needed to be very near the bedroom, so they could see or hear us. I would make a big (but very quiet) show of putting away laundry, for example, taking multiple trips past their open doors. And for a couple, I sometimes sat in the floor outside their bedroom, quietly reading, so they could see me and hear me. There was a week ir two with each of them where there was a lot of bounce back to bed routines. We just tried to make it as quiet and as boring —and as matter of fact as possible, it kept the excitement from being fed and didn’t provide any motivation to stay awake to see what the Grownups were up to: just boring stuff…

Which reminds me of when our oldest successfully lobbied for a 10 pm bedtime. He was so excited! And sorely disappointed that there was no special exciting adult magic going on.

This turned out to be a timely post as our son just made a huge shift in the past week. For months we had a consistent and predictable routine, but now he seems to be doing similar as you mention. He knows he can push to stay up later, and from what I can tell just wants to be with us after he's gone down.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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My daughter has this hat.

FCA6E835-4801-4AF9-9123-8DCA61871F1C.jpeg

She says the kids at school “... call it a cheetah hat. But I think it is an ocelot. Cheetahs are more yellow.”

And I’m wondering, ocelot?! She get that from Wild Kratts, her nation geographic animal atlas. I had to look the animal up!
 

Jimmy Higgins

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My daughter has this hat.

View attachment 37917

She says the kids at school “... call it a cheetah hat. But I think it is an ocelot. Cheetahs are more yellow.”
I think you have to go more by the spots. Solid or donuts with a brown center, that sort of thing. Individual or linked into chains.
She actually mentioned that whrn i asked her. She Said they were larger for ocelot.
 

Keith&Co.

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My daughter has this hat.

View attachment 37917

She says the kids at school “... call it a cheetah hat. But I think it is an ocelot. Cheetahs are more yellow.”
I think you have to go more by the spots. Solid or donuts with a brown center, that sort of thing. Individual or linked into chains.
She actually mentioned that whrn i asked her. She Said they were larger for ocelot.
Smart kid. Buy her a panda.
 

Toni

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My daughter has this hat.

View attachment 37917

She says the kids at school “... call it a cheetah hat. But I think it is an ocelot. Cheetahs are more yellow.”
I think you have to go more by the spots. Solid or donuts with a brown center, that sort of thing. Individual or linked into chains.
She actually mentioned that whrn i asked her. She Said they were larger for ocelot.
Smart kid. Buy her a panda.
Which kind?
 

Jimmy Higgins

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Red pandas in our house are called "darn raccoons".

And red pandas definitely would be nice in the home as they are effectively a living / breathing Swifter.
 

Keith&Co.

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Red pandas in our house are called "darn raccoons".

And red pandas definitely would be nice in the home as they are effectively a living / breathing Swifter.
So, get her a damn raccoon. And when you tell her to clean her room, she throws rice on the floor and goes to watch TV. "Chow's working on it!"
 

Toni

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Red pandas in our house are called "darn raccoons".

And red pandas definitely would be nice in the home as they are effectively a living / breathing Swifter.
So, get her a damn raccoon. And when you tell her to clean her room, she throws rice on the floor and goes to watch TV. "Chow's working on it!"
Uh, baby raccoons are sweet and fun. Adult raccoons are not and do not make good pets, even if they are raised in a loving, well intentioned household. Their teeth and claws are sharp and they are very very clever.

I don’t know about red pandas.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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At our home red pandas = "darn raccoons". Just something that happened... stuff like that happens often.

Every Xmas, I put out a Panda trap so we can have Panda Filet with brunch, but it never works.

1649171076732.png
 

rousseau

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Thinking about the fact lately that I've put our eldest down at night five nights per week from about the time he was 14 months (he's now 22). Originally the idea was to give mom a break, but now that I've done it for so long I'm recognizing how special this is.

I was putting him down last night and suddenly it hit me that last July I had a baby, and now I have a full blown, very big toddler (who's still very much a baby). It was great getting to see that progression, and now watch the progression continue.

Then I wake up at 3 AM to feed my 1 week old baby, and rock him back to sleep. It's very much like going back in time and getting to start from the beginning again.

As a side-note: when we just had our eldest, the advice leave the mess didn't really apply. With the two of them it very much applies.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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Daughter decided to jam the Nintendo Wii with a game disc. This might or might not have broken the drive's ability to work. Opened it up, a couple plastic pieces fell out. Tried to figure out the drive... remembered I suck at mechanical things. Looked online and ordered a Wii disc drive replacement. Plugged that in, and the games played again. The Wii doesn't look quite as nice as it did, but again... not my strength.

My daughter up to this point, had been really good with electronics, for the most part, including disc handling! Got her a Chromebook when was 5 to do education apps on. So I was a bit surprised at this breakdown. And of course, she needs to tell me this is happening while I'm holding a chainsaw...

No really, I was cutting out the overgrown bushes (almost trees at this point) in the front of the house and she comes out telling me there is a problem... the Wii isn't reading the discs. I remind her I'm kind of busy. So she then systematically checks every Wii game to see if it it will read them (it could read two), but couldn't play any of them. I get in there, she admits her error. So proud, so disappointed at the same time. :D

First world parent problems.
 
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