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Question for history nerds - American Civil War

Angry Floof

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I'm curious about international criticism of American democracy during our Civil War.

Google is not forthcoming, probably because I don't know what key words would narrow that down. I only get contemporary topics no matter what search terms I use, and I specifically want to understand how other countries viewed the US during that time in our history, what they thought about the ideals of democracy in the context of the Grand Experiment, did they think democracy was a failure or the US as a failure in general? Stuff like that.

Does anyone have links that might help me? Even the extensive Wikipedia topic offers nothing about this specifically.
 

rousseau

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You might not be finding much info with Google because it's a pretty esoteric ask. One of the counter-intuitive things I've found with history, is that sometimes the information you're looking for is harder to find than you realize, and if you go back far enough it just doesn't exist.

My guess is that the American Civil War has plenty of writing about it, but the opinion of Europe at the time not as much and may not even be widely known. But with regards to your question, my guess is that it's unlikely that Europe viewed the U.S. democracy unfavorably at the time. That was around the time that democracy was emerging worldwide, including within Europe, and the Civil War may have been seen for exactly what it was - a necessary war between two factions of a single state.

And even that might be an over-simplification, because different states and parties may have viewed things differently.
 

Bronzeage

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No nation recognized the Confederate States of America, which is understandable. At the time, no European nation would see any advantage to either outcome of the US war. It did give France the confidence to invade Mexico.

The invasion began as a coalition between France, Britain, and Spain to force the Mexican government to honor foreign debt payments. When it became apparent that France intended to conquer Mexico and install a monarch subject to the French Emperor, Napoleon III, Britain and Spain withdrew, leaving France by themselves.

It's not really conceivable any of this would have been possible if the United States had not been distracted with domestic matters.
 

Trausti

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It seems unlikely that critique of American democracy would have been a subject at the time. The Union still existed and both sides had elected governments. Neither had universal suffrage; nor did any of the other purported democracies of the day. The idea that democracy is good and should be protected is a byproduct of the First World War.
 

SLD

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I think most of Europe was preoccupied with its own problems. France, under Nap III was embroiled in Mexico, Prussia was busy reuniting. So was Italy. Spain had too many problems throughout its empire to be concerned. Britain was the most involved since they relied heavily on cotton for manufacturing and corn from the North for food. They almost intervened on behalf of the confederacy, but Lincoln wisely backed down, saying one war at a time.

Continued mass immigration fueled Union Armies, including my great great grandfather.

Militarily, though, the fighting was widely studied in Europe by the professionals. Breech loaders appeared shortly after the end of the war and became quite common quickly. The Prussian General Staff took careful note of the use of trains in the war. They used those lessons wisely just a few years later against France. Germany later adopted Upton’s tactics at Spotsylvania on a much grander scale in the Spring of 1918. It almost worked just as it almost worked at Spotsylvania.
 
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