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Texas in Crisis

bilby

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No nuclear power plants have suffered any burst pipes. One (of four) reactors was shut down due to a sensor error. One of several redundant sensors in one of four reactors gave a false reading, and the insanely cautious regulations demanded that the reactor be shut down in such circumstances. Which would be hyper-cautious under normal conditions, but is positively dangerous when the state is already seeing deaths due to insufficient generation.

The lesson here is not to be so stupidly scared by nuclear power plants.


Wellll, hang on now.

The reason Texas is having such terrible woes is that they chose to avoid regulations by making their own power grid so they could skip maintenance and preparedness steps which lack is now actively causing failures.

Are you sure promoting nuclear power to a state with a proven track record of not just ignoring but celebrating the lack of safeguards is a prudent move?

Well the regulations are federal, so Texas (or any other state) doesn't get a say. The NRC isn't in the business of ignoring anything; They require power plants to employ a small army of staff whose only purpose is to certify that everyone else is complying with every jot and tittle of the regulations.
 

bilby

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Have you seen any lack of safeguards in nuclear power stations in Texas?

Looks like they are being too cautious, going by bilby's info.

I’m capable of holding both ideas in my head. If there’s any place where Chernobyl style negligence would happen in the US it would be Texas.

Well the Chernobyl negligence was in the design and build as well as the operation. You need to fail badly at all three to get a Chernobyl style failure. Operating failures in western plants are hugely expensive, but they don't hurt anyone (except the underwriters and their hangers-on).
 

lpetrich

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Cenk Uygur on Twitter: "I sent tweet about @joerogan moving to Texas to get away from government regulation & then TX had epic disaster because of govt. deregulation. What happened next was hilarious- every blue check conservative jumping to defend his feelings in desperate attempt to get on his show." / Twitter
then
Matthew Kleinschmidt on Twitter: "@cenkuygur @joerogan Cenk, TYT was my first real love on the progressive news front. TY. But you guys have become bitter over the last couple years... toward allies and friends. Please cut the shit. Set a standard of moral heartiness and adhere to it, w/ humility and kindness, for the good of self." / Twitter

-

Beto O'Rourke on Twitter: "Thank you @AOC and everyone who contributed in this drive to help the people of Texas. We are grateful to you!" / Twitter
then
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter: "Thank you @BetoORourke for helping organize thousands of wellness check-in calls! 📞" / Twitter

This is how much AOC has raised: $2 million.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter: "We’ve now raised $2 MILLION in relief for Texans & are adding more orgs.🙏🏽
I’ll be flying to Texas today ✈️ to visit with Houston rep Sylvia Garcia (@LaCongresista) to distribute supplies and help amplify needs & solutions.
Let’s see how far we can go: (link)" / Twitter


Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter: "Charity isn’t a replacement for good governance, but we won’t turn away from helping people in need when things hit the fan.
People understand that now is the time for collective action and doing what we can w/ whatever we’ve got.
🙏🏽 Thank you y Pa’lante! (link)" / Twitter


Short for "para adelante" or "forward."
 

lpetrich

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Donald Trump Jr. Goes On Insane Rant Blaming Democratic Governors For Texas Crisis
noting
Donald Trump Jr. on Twitter: "The hypocrisy of those trying to cancel Ted Cruz who have been totally silent on their Democrat Governor’s incompetence is telling. My thoughts on the Cancún Cruz fauxoutrage! #Cruz #CancunGate is fake. (link)" / Twitter

Trump Jr. Dubs Cruz 'Cancun Cruz' in Attempted Defense of Cancun Trip - Second Nexus
According to texts from Cruz's wife Heidi to friends, the family was tired of their "FREEZING" house and made a snap decision to take the trip, where they planned to stay at an oceanside Ritz-Carlton Hotel.

...
"Now, if I were a Trump, which I am, I'd come up with a nickname for something like this. Like maybe, I don't know, 'Cancún Cruz.' It's funny, okay? But like honestly I can't get on this bandwagon, trying to cancel the guy."

Jennifer 'pro-reality' Rubin on Twitter: "It is rare to find a politician as disliked by his own side as he is by the opposing one. In that, we can thank Cruz for doing his part in helping the country attain unity. https://t.co/VdEhRV5ORm" / Twitter
noting
Opinion | Just how unpopular is Ted Cruz? - The Washington Post
noting
Ted Cruz’s Cancún Trip: Family Texts Detail His Political Blunder - The New York Times
Text messages sent from Ms. Cruz to friends and Houston neighbors on Wednesday revealed a hastily planned trip. Their house was “FREEZING,” as Ms. Cruz put it — and she proposed a getaway until Sunday. Ms. Cruz invited others to join them at the Ritz-Carlton in Cancún, where they had stayed “many times,” noting the room price this week ($309 per night) and its good security. The text messages were provided to The New York Times and confirmed by a second person on the thread, who declined to be identified because of the private nature of the texts.

...
Mr. Cruz’s critics quickly circulated hashtags mocking his trip: #FlyinTed, a play on former President Donald J. Trump’s derisive nickname for Mr. Cruz during the 2016 primary race, and #FledCruz, among them. Some Democratic groups sought to fund-raise off the episode, and the state Democratic Party renewed its calls for Mr. Cruz’s resignation.
Cancun Cruz. I like that.
 

lpetrich

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Texas power outages: Grid was 'minutes' from failing, lawmaker says - CNN
Texas officials pointed the blame at the power company and called for investigations. US Rep. Marc Veasey, a Democrat who represents parts of Fort Worth and Dallas, said he's learned from an industry executive that the power grid was just minutes from failing on Monday before state agency officials initiated emergency rolling outages.

"I want people to know that we were minutes away from the entire grid crashing," he told CNN's Ed Lavandera, criticizing ERCOT and Republican leaders for not better preparing for the freeze.

"They certainly could have taken some precautions that would have prevented what we're having to deal with now," Veasey said.

Texas was minutes away from monthslong power outages, officials say | The Texas Tribune - "Officials with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas said that grid operators implemented blackouts to avoid a catastrophic failure that could have left Texans in the dark for months."
Texas’ power grid was “seconds and minutes” away from a catastrophic failure that could have left Texans in the dark for months, officials with the entity that operates the grid said Thursday.

As millions of customers throughout the state begin to have power restored after days of massive blackouts, officials with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, which operates the power grid that covers most of the state, said Texas was dangerously close to a worst-case scenario: uncontrolled blackouts across the state.

The quick decision that grid operators made in the early hours of Monday morning to begin what was intended to be rolling blackouts — but lasted days for millions of Texans — occurred because operators were seeing warning signs that massive amounts of energy supply was dropping off the grid.
then
Texas Tribune on Twitter: "Texas’ power grid was “seconds and minutes” away from a catastrophic failure that could have left Texans in the dark for months, officials with the entity that operates the grid said Thursday. (link)" / Twitter
then
Rep. Ro Khanna on Twitter: "As Chairman of the @OversightDems’ Environment Subcommittee, ..." / Twitter
As Chairman of the @OversightDems’ Environment Subcommittee, I’m launching an investigation into how this mess unfolded. We need to know why so many fossil fuel sources failed, why ERCOT wasn’t better prepared, who participated in the conspiracy to falsely blame renewables.

Once the dust settles here, I also plan to hold a hearing with the leaders responsible for this total meltdown. Texans need answers, Americans deserve to know the truth about the failures of fossil fuels, and we must know how to prevent this from happening again.
 

Swammerdami

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Have you seen any lack of safeguards in nuclear power stations in Texas?

Looks like they are being too cautious, going by bilby's info.

I’m capable of holding both ideas in my head. If there’s any place where Chernobyl style negligence would happen in the US it would be Texas.

Well the Chernobyl negligence was in the design and build as well as the operation. You need to fail badly at all three to get a Chernobyl style failure. Operating failures in western plants are hugely expensive, but they don't hurt anyone (except the underwriters and their hangers-on).

I read Confessions of a Rogue Nuclear Regulator by Gregory B. Jaczko, former Chairman of the NRC. I do NOT recommend the book, but it has made me a bit less sanguine about nuclear power. He seems to extrapolate from Fukushima: if anything can go wrong it will.


BTW, the Chernobyl mini-series is a great watch! It is very interesting technically and psychologically — there were heroes and villains — but also to get a look at Soviet governance. Apparently it was the huge incompetence exposed by Chrenobyl (rather than Reagan's rhetoric :) ) that brought down the Soviet state.
 

Deepak

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Have you seen any lack of safeguards in nuclear power stations in Texas?

Looks like they are being too cautious, going by bilby's info.

I’m capable of holding both ideas in my head. If there’s any place where Chernobyl style negligence would happen in the US it would be Texas.

Well the Chernobyl negligence was in the design and build as well as the operation. You need to fail badly at all three to get a Chernobyl style failure. Operating failures in western plants are hugely expensive, but they don't hurt anyone (except the underwriters and their hangers-on).

I’d like to think that you’re just being a nuclear proponent and want to defend the technology but you’re misunderstanding my point, I think.

The question isn’t whether the results of any given incident are going to be equal given the same scenario being tried, with whatever failsafes and whatnot activating.

My point is that we’re coming off a year of near half a million deaths from the politicization of a disease, and a party dominated by a Christian libertarian death cult. If your point is that the regulatory agencies in the US are strong enough that we could put Jared Kushner in charge for an indefinite period of time and you’re going to the mat to make the same assurance, then perhaps we have a discussion here. Or if you think there’s some state more likely in the other 49. If not, then this sounds like people talking about the resiliency of any given American system in the lead up to the Trump presidency.

A system is only good in as much as it’s defended. When you have sabotage from within, all your safeguards start to break down. We’ve already seen it with the financial regulatory system in decades past. People are living it now in Texas.
 

Harry Bosch

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Well the Chernobyl negligence was in the design and build as well as the operation. You need to fail badly at all three to get a Chernobyl style failure. Operating failures in western plants are hugely expensive, but they don't hurt anyone (except the underwriters and their hangers-on).

I’d like to think that you’re just being a nuclear proponent and want to defend the technology but you’re misunderstanding my point, I think.

The question isn’t whether the results of any given incident are going to be equal given the same scenario being tried, with whatever failsafes and whatnot activating.

My point is that we’re coming off a year of near half a million deaths from the politicization of a disease, and a party dominated by a Christian libertarian death cult. If your point is that the regulatory agencies in the US are strong enough that we could put Jared Kushner in charge for an indefinite period of time and you’re going to the mat to make the same assurance, then perhaps we have a discussion here. Or if you think there’s some state more likely in the other 49. If not, then this sounds like people talking about the resiliency of any given American system in the lead up to the Trump presidency.

A system is only good in as much as it’s defended. When you have sabotage from within, all your safeguards start to break down. We’ve already seen it with the financial regulatory system in decades past. People are living it now in Texas.

I don't understand why people are so scared of nuclear power. Sure Chernobyl and Fukushima was terrible. Nuclear power has 330 fewer deaths than coal; 250 times less than oil, 38 times fewer than gas.
 

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https://www.galvnews.com/news/free/article_2d9d26ea-a11d-5447-995c-3c7524f9f762.html

'Soviet-style' system led to Texas grid fiasco, expert says


“In the state’s enthusiasm for deregulating the electric market, the legislature and then-Gov. George Bush re-created an old-style Soviet Union purchasing bureau, called ERCOT,” Hirs said.

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, is charged with overseeing the state’s power grid. Texas receives most of its power via the Texas Interconnection, a power grid separate from the rest of the country.

Texas social media are lit up with trumpsucking morons furious with the "lack of response from the Demonkratz in Washington".
Interspersed with their condemnations are reassertions that "Texans are tough, we will overcome this and show the Dems and WHERE IS FEMA? WHY IS IT TAKING SO LONG??? Waaaaaah!!"
 

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The Activists Who Embrace Nuclear Power

Hoff and Zaitz formed a nonprofit. Like the leaders of many other movements led by women—protests against war, drunk driving, and, of course, nuclear power—they sought to capitalize on their status as mothers. They toyed with a few generic names—Mothers for Climate, Mothers for Sustainability—because they worried that the word “nuclear” would scare some people off. But they ultimately discarded those more innocuous options. “We wanted to be really clear that we think nuclear needs to be part of the solution,” Zaitz said. They now run a small activist organization, Mothers for Nuclear, which argues that nuclear power is an indispensable tool in the quest for a decarbonized society.

https://www.mothersfornuclear.org/
 

Angra Mainyu

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Which two ideas?

In any case, the nuclear industry in Texas hasn't had any accidents, and modern reactors have even better safety mechanisms than those currently in operation.

The one that I mentioned, that Texas would be the place, and the one I quoted, which is that in the land of Texas no case of negligence has been found. What other ones could I be talking about?
Is there any particular reason to thin k Texas would be the place, given that they're being cautions?

Moreover, this is the wrong way of looking at the matter. Suppose it is true that if there’s any place where Chernobyl style negligence would happen in the US it would be Texas. That does not entail that there is a place in the US where Chernobyl style negligence would happen. My point is that such negligence in Texas seems too improbable given their record to worry about it. Additionally, if a nuclear power station were to be built today, it would not be vulnerable to what caused Chernobyl's accident. In fact, there are reactor designs with advanced safety features that would be really hard to break in any dangerous way.

Now, if Texas does not use nuclear power, it will still need some form of power, which will be more dangerous than nuclear going by the track record of different power sources. It will also be more polluting. And probably worse in extreme weather situations.
 

Deepak

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Is there any particular reason to thin k Texas would be the place, given that they're being cautions?

Of course. Why would I say this place would 'X' with no particular reason. Indeed I can provide a multitude of reasons.

Again, though, I want to be sure we're talking about the same thing, and specifically the thing I'm concerned about is you're so wrapped around the axle due to the word Chernobyl that you're mistaking the point I'm making here. Even after I've explained it already.

I'm a proponent of nuclear power. I don't think there's any future where nuclear is not in the energy generation mix. Sparing the discovery of entirely novel ideas in physics, the math simply does not let us maintain something near the current quality of life, diet, consumption, and family planning privileges we enjoy now purely with renewable energy.

The thing that I'm specifically concerned about is groups like the North Korean regime, Islamic terrorists, or Texas Republicans having any control of, or access to nuclear facilities.

And, I'm sure, some folks might disagree with the assessment. In either case, the specifics of the energy mix we use in the future is not the concern of this thread - it's the particular incompetence of Texas, their government, and the people who have voting power to elect that government. So are you trying to address my point, or are you trying to straw man me?
 

T.G.G. Moogly

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And scientists learn from their mistakes.

Will Texas Republicans?

Many will never learn but many will. Biden doesn't give a shit about who voted for him and who didn't when it comes to addressing problems. This is the best approach whether it makes converts or not.
 

bilby

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Well the Chernobyl negligence was in the design and build as well as the operation. You need to fail badly at all three to get a Chernobyl style failure. Operating failures in western plants are hugely expensive, but they don't hurt anyone (except the underwriters and their hangers-on).

I’d like to think that you’re just being a nuclear proponent and want to defend the technology but you’re misunderstanding my point, I think.

The question isn’t whether the results of any given incident are going to be equal given the same scenario being tried, with whatever failsafes and whatnot activating.

My point is that we’re coming off a year of near half a million deaths from the politicization of a disease, and a party dominated by a Christian libertarian death cult. If your point is that the regulatory agencies in the US are strong enough that we could put Jared Kushner in charge for an indefinite period of time and you’re going to the mat to make the same assurance, then perhaps we have a discussion here. Or if you think there’s some state more likely in the other 49. If not, then this sounds like people talking about the resiliency of any given American system in the lead up to the Trump presidency.

A system is only good in as much as it’s defended. When you have sabotage from within, all your safeguards start to break down. We’ve already seen it with the financial regulatory system in decades past. People are living it now in Texas.

I don't understand why people are so scared of nuclear power. Sure Chernobyl and Fukushima was terrible. Nuclear power has 330 fewer deaths than coal; 250 times less than oil, 38 times fewer than gas.

People have been told since the 1950s that nuclear power plant accidents are uniquely and horrifyingly severe. A meltdown would kill millions, and leave vast areas uninhabitable for tens of thousands of years.

We have seen four meltdowns (Three Mile Island, plus three at Fukushima Daiichi), and the combined death toll was zero. Two workers at Fukushima were hospitalised with minor beta burns to their legs after wading through contaminated water, and made a full recovery. One man's widow was awarded compensation for his death from lung cancer, despite having been a lifelong smoker, and despite his death coming too soon after the Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami for radiation from F. Daiichi to be a plausible cause.

These facts suggest that meltdowns are not, in fact, particularly dangerous. They are hugely expensive, but they don't hurt anyone.

There's also an excellent example of a truly worst case accident. If you had an uncontained fire that pumped a sizeable fraction of the total radionuclide inventory from a reactor into the atmosphere, and authorities refused to mitigate the damage at all for several days, then you could expect to see the full horror of the worst that can happen.

It turns out that the casualty toll is that of a typical major industrial accident. A couple of hundred dead, mostly workers on site at the time of the accident, and first responders who brought it under control. There was a sharp up-tick in thyroid cancers amongst children in the local area, but no fatalities (fortunately thyroid cancers are easy to detect early and to treat successfully). There's been no increase in other cancers; In fact the rate of cancer overall is lower in the most irradiated areas than would have been expected to be observed if no accident had occurred. Despite hysteria from Greenpeace et al., nobody's died or become sick in the vast area of Europe where Chernobyl fallout was detected. The initial exclusion zone has become a nature reserve, and the people who refused to leave it have all lived long and unremarkable lives, with similar life expectancy and similar diseases of old age to the rest of the population of the former Soviet Union.

Chernobyl was as bad an accident as you could get from a nuclear power plant. But it killed an order of magnitude fewer people, and contaminated far less land, than the contemporary Union Carbide disaster in Bhopal, which killed at least 3,700 people (estimates range up to 16,000).

And if money is your thing, Chernobyl cost less than the contemporary Piper Alpha explosion and fire, which was at the time the world's largest single insured loss from an industrial accident.

Nuclear power plants are less dangerous than the chemical and industrial plants that ring our major cities. Accidents are incredibly rare, and in the worst case are less dangerous than those in other industrial facilities.

In the 1950s and 60s, when this was all hypothetical, people had an excuse to err on the side of caution.

But now we know how infrequent and how unremarkable nuclear power accidents are, relative to the other industrial accidents we take for granted as a part of living in comfort and wealth. There's no longer an excuse for radiophobia; It's just a consequence of inertia. And it's largely a characteristic of baby boomers, so there's some hope that it will fade over the next few decades.
 

bilby

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Is there any particular reason to thin k Texas would be the place, given that they're being cautions?

Of course. Why would I say this place would 'X' with no particular reason. Indeed I can provide a multitude of reasons.

Again, though, I want to be sure we're talking about the same thing, and specifically the thing I'm concerned about is you're so wrapped around the axle due to the word Chernobyl that you're mistaking the point I'm making here. Even after I've explained it already.

I'm a proponent of nuclear power. I don't think there's any future where nuclear is not in the energy generation mix. Sparing the discovery of entirely novel ideas in physics, the math simply does not let us maintain something near the current quality of life, diet, consumption, and family planning privileges we enjoy now purely with renewable energy.

The thing that I'm specifically concerned about is groups like the North Korean regime, Islamic terrorists, or Texas Republicans having any control of, or access to nuclear facilities.

And, I'm sure, some folks might disagree with the assessment. In either case, the specifics of the energy mix we use in the future is not the concern of this thread - it's the particular incompetence of Texas, their government, and the people who have voting power to elect that government. So are you trying to address my point, or are you trying to straw man me?

If we're going to let Texans (or anyone else) have oil refineries and chemical plants, then also letting them have nuclear power plants isn't going to noticeably increase the risk to either the public or the environment.
 

Loren Pechtel

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So, we need to seriously send in the national guard with the army corps of engineers, else expect the electric company to fix things (they are the ones who turned it off on purpose), and get power back on.

None of Texas was built for this shit.

This is a crisis, and the Texas government is dropping the ball. There has been no power for quite some time now. People are dying and something needs to be done about this.

Biden has gotten his first natural disaster with a human cost. Let's see how he handles it.

People get what they vote for. Texas doesn't like regulations to cover the rare circumstances. Rare doesn't mean nonexistent. You got hit by extreme cold, power companies are better off simply accepting that they won't have enough power to sell in extreme cold than in properly preparing for it. People freezing to death is an externiality that isn't going to be covered in an anti-regulatory climate. This was an entirely foreseeable consequence of voting Republican.

Since the issue is that the extreme cold has frozen the machinery that makes energy because industry chose not to build for extreme cold, what would national guard troops do? Hang bottled gas powered blow dryers on wind turbines?

Exactly. There's basically nothing for them to do. The equipment isn't going to operate until it warms up and while they could bring in generators you need generators capable of syncing to the grid or there only useful for spot use (ie, powering the hospital etc.) Plugging an ordinary generator into the grid is going to be counterproductive.

EuUvp69XYAYivMJ

EuUvp7FXMAI2XU_

Since that's the Daily Fail I now question the existence of windmills.

The big problem isn't windmills that can't turn, but natural gas facilities that can't deliver gas.

I do hope we can help them. Seems like FEMA and Engineer Corps should be on the road already.

Send thoughts and prayers instead--at least they won't be an additional load on the resources.
 

Loren Pechtel

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. Natgas generation has a rather evident vulnerability, its pipelines, but that does not exist for coal and nuclear generation. So what affected them?
I just read that reactors in Texas are shutting down due to problems getting enough cooling water.
Burst pipes, etc.

There's another factor with nuclear, also--nuclear plants are required to have two independent external sources of power available at all times. If the external sources of power drop to one the reactor trips. (The intent is to avoid a Fukushima type incident--an offline reactor still needs power for it's cooling pumps for some time after it's been turned "off"--turning it "off" really is turning it to 3% and it will slowly go down from there.) If your grid is collapsing you can end up tripping a reactor and making the problem worse.

(Note that the two independent sources doesn't mean it's actually drawing on them, only that it can. The wires that carry power out are acceptable means of bringing power in so long as there is another adequate source of power connected to them. You must have two wires and two power plants, though.)
 

Deepak

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Is there any particular reason to thin k Texas would be the place, given that they're being cautions?

Of course. Why would I say this place would 'X' with no particular reason. Indeed I can provide a multitude of reasons.

Again, though, I want to be sure we're talking about the same thing, and specifically the thing I'm concerned about is you're so wrapped around the axle due to the word Chernobyl that you're mistaking the point I'm making here. Even after I've explained it already.

I'm a proponent of nuclear power. I don't think there's any future where nuclear is not in the energy generation mix. Sparing the discovery of entirely novel ideas in physics, the math simply does not let us maintain something near the current quality of life, diet, consumption, and family planning privileges we enjoy now purely with renewable energy.

The thing that I'm specifically concerned about is groups like the North Korean regime, Islamic terrorists, or Texas Republicans having any control of, or access to nuclear facilities.

And, I'm sure, some folks might disagree with the assessment. In either case, the specifics of the energy mix we use in the future is not the concern of this thread - it's the particular incompetence of Texas, their government, and the people who have voting power to elect that government. So are you trying to address my point, or are you trying to straw man me?

If we're going to let Texans (or anyone else) have oil refineries and chemical plants, then also letting them have nuclear power plants isn't going to noticeably increase the risk to either the public or the environment.

Precisely: among the three toys that are small enough to choke a baby no one single toy presents a risk that's clearly higher than the other two.

My point is that stupid babies require the most attention. But it seems like you're a fan of Kinder Surprise in particular.
 

Loren Pechtel

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And I highly doubt water mains never break in Russia.

Not on such supposedly massive scale

Water mains break quite frequently in the Los Angeles area. They are long overdue for replacement but not many seem to get replaced prior to failure. No money apparently but somehow California managed to raise and squander billions of dollars on a "high speed rail" project that few people wanted and even fewer will actually use. We were told to restrict our showers to two minutes, not flush the toilet for number ones, not to water our lawns, not to wash our cars and turn the tap off when brushing your teeth. Priorities eh ?

Once again, you fail to understand. The restrictions you are talking about are due to water supply, not water delivery. The number of people using water goes up, what nature delivers does not. Actually, it's a bit worse than that as the Colorado river water allocation was based on some rather optimistic estimates--the river is not delivering as much as the agreements say it will.
 

Loren Pechtel

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Yup, you do not want to draw more from the grid than it can deliver. You slash load regardless of consequences to keep it in balance--if you don't the whole thing goes down hard and you have major headaches restarting it piece by little piece.
 

Angra Mainyu

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Deepak said:
I'm a proponent of nuclear power. I don't think there's any future where nuclear is not in the energy generation mix. Sparing the discovery of entirely novel ideas in physics, the math simply does not let us maintain something near the current quality of life, diet, consumption, and family planning privileges we enjoy now purely with renewable energy.
Good, that is true except for the distant future.


Deepak said:
The thing that I'm specifically concerned about is groups like the North Korean regime, Islamic terrorists, or Texas Republicans having any control of, or access to nuclear facilities.
Not good. The Texan administration is not bent on making nuclear weapons (the US already makes them), and certainly not on killing civilians with them (as Islamic terrorists would). Moreover, Texas does not have a bad track record of nuclear safety.

In addition to that, you have to consider that if it's not nuclear energy, it will be some other kind of energy - which data shows is more polluting and more dangerous.


Deepak said:
And, I'm sure, some folks might disagree with the assessment. In either case, the specifics of the energy mix we use in the future is not the concern of this thread - it's the particular incompetence of Texas, their government, and the people who have voting power to elect that government. So are you trying to address my point, or are you trying to straw man me?
You're the one not addressing some of the points I've been making. Two of them are:

1. Texas does not have a bad track record of nuclear safety.
2. Nuclear energy is better than the alternatives, in terms of safety and environmental impact. There is no particular reason to think that that will change in Texas. One can tell that just by looking at the record in Texas.
 

lpetrich

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More on the Senator from Cancun:
Ted Cruz's family soaks up Cancun sun as Texas shivers
Cruz’s wife, Heidi, was seen on the sand wearing a red bikini under blue beach umbrellas, video and photos obtained by The Post show.

Cruz cut his trip short by two days and returned to Houston Thursday night after receiving backlash from constituents and colleagues for leaving his state while millions of Texans remained in the dark.

Ted Cruz's explanation for his Cancun trip made things worse - CNNPolitics
"Wanting to be a good dad, I flew down with them last night and am flying back this afternoon."

Except we know that Cruz changed plans after the firestorm over him leaving Texas amid a power disaster began. Why? Because he told Fox News' Sean Hannity this on Thursday night:

"I had initially planned to stay through the weekend and to work remotely there, but as I -- as I was heading down there, you know, I started to have second thoughts almost immediately because the crisis here in Texas, you need to be here on the ground."


Fundraisers For Texas—From AOC, Beyoncé, Reese Witherspoon And More—Net Millions
Also former Baltimore Ravens cornerback Pierre Desir, and politician Beto O'Rourke.
The contributions received by Ocasio-Cortez will be split among five organizations across the state of Texas, including the Bridge Homeless Recovery Center in Dallas, Ending Community Homelessness Coalition in Austin, the Houston Food Bank and Feeding Texas, a statewide hunger-relief charity.
 

lpetrich

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AOC in Texas:

Adrienne Bell on Twitter: "My friend @aoc came to Houston, bringing over $3 million with her for hurting Texans. It’s what you do, cause that’s who we are - Americans. #TexasRebuilds (pic link)" / Twitter
Adrienne Bell ran for a House seat in Texas, without success.

Kelly O'Donnell on Twitter: "New York’s progressive voice @AOC is in Houston today announcing more than $3 million raised to assist 10 organizations for Texans in crisis. “That’s the New York spirit, that’s the Texas spirit that’s the American spirit” https://t.co/CfwmqU27qT" / Twitter
then
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter: "I can’t believe we’ve surged past $3 million for Texas!
Houston Food Bank is using resources like these to try to get 30,000 meal boxes out in the next TWO days.
They’re just 1 of 12 Texas orgs were now partnering with.
Let’s keep going!
Give here: (link)" / Twitter



Someone complained about her visit that AOC = Always On Camera, and someone else that
ltmcdies 🇨🇦🥂 on Twitter: "@KellyO @sr78 @AOC can we stop acting like this the only one... but I notice some of the others don't feel the need to jump in front of camera. https://t.co/NSL1jvtyZP" / Twitter

Mary Busby on Twitter: "@ltmcdies @KellyO @sr78 @AOC You realize to raise money, you need to raise awareness for your cause? Of course she’s talking about it! This is an obtuse argument and only seeded in your hatred for her. 🙄" / Twitter

Norio on Twitter: "@ltmcdies @KellyO @sr78 @AOC What AOC is doing, in front of a camera, is raising awareness in fundraising aid for Texas. But you’d rather see Trump in front of the camera touting a Bible, in front of church, instigating hate. Maybe he & you can open up the Bible to 2 Chronicles 7:14." / Twitter
 

TomC

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This is going to make me look old and petty, but I don't care. ;)

I remember an episode from the winter of 1973. The OPEC oil embargo was hammering US power supplies. Massive shortages were combined with skyrocketing prices. Home heating was particularly a disaster across the northern states. People were being permanently forced out of their homes. This hit older folks especially hard, because they tended to be "house rich, but cash poor" as they often lived on fixed incomes.

But it was a boon to energy producers like many Texans. When there was a proposal for federal regulations on prices and distribution, some Texan high muckety muck(Governor, IIRC) announced
"Those damn Yankees can freeze in the dark!"

Tom
 

TomC

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Cong. Jackson Lee, Cong. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, and Cong. Garcia - they joined the volunteers in packing food donations into boxes at the Houston Food Bank.

I'd bet a good deal that their presence at the food bank was a net loss for Houstonians in need. This photo op, with all the staff and security necessary, probably caused more disruption than Lee, AOC, and Garcia could work off packing boxes.

She could make up for it by challenging Cruz & Co to donate as much to such organizations as they've received in donations from the people who benefited from the shoddy procedures that caused the disaster.
Tom
 

crazyfingers

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This is going to make me look old and petty, but I don't care. ;)

I remember an episode from the winter of 1973. The OPEC oil embargo was hammering US power supplies. Massive shortages were combined with skyrocketing prices. Home heating was particularly a disaster across the northern states. People were being permanently forced out of their homes. This hit older folks especially hard, because they tended to be "house rich, but cash poor" as they often lived on fixed incomes.

But it was a boon to energy producers like many Texans. When there was a proposal for federal regulations on prices and distribution, some Texan high muckety muck(Governor, IIRC) announced
"Those damn Yankees can freeze in the dark!"

Tom

I remember during the oil embargo waiting in gas lines in the car with my mother. The line was once about a half mile long. I don't recall a home heating oil issue but I was just a little kid so I don't expect that I'd have known about it.
 

crazyfingers

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I read in the news about possible oil and gas disruptions from this fiasco. I don't gas up much. Don't drive a lot these days but gas seems to be up about 20 cents.
 

ZiprHead

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gas seems to be up about 20 cents.

RVonse made that observation in another thread a few days ago.

It's Biden's fault. I forget exactly why...

Restarting Texas’ Damaged Oil Refineries Is Going to Take Weeks

Exxon Mobil Corp.’s Baytown and Beaumont plants, Marathon Petroleum Corp.’s Galveston Bay refinery and Total SE’s Port Arthur facility all face at least several weeks to resume normal operations, people familiar with the situation said. Gasoline prices at the pump could reach $3 a gallon in May as long outages crimp supply ahead of the driving season, said Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for retailer tracker GasBuddy.

The cold snap and power outages that roiled energy markets affected more than 20 oil refineries in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Crude-processing capacity fell by about 5.5 million barrels a day, according to Amrita Sen, chief oil analyst for consultant Energy Aspects Ltd.
 

lpetrich

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Cong. Jackson Lee, Cong. Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, and Cong. Garcia - they joined the volunteers in packing food donations into boxes at the Houston Food Bank.
I'd bet a good deal that their presence at the food bank was a net loss for Houstonians in need. This photo op, with all the staff and security necessary, probably caused more disruption than Lee, AOC, and Garcia could work off packing boxes.
It didn't seem very horribly disruptive to me.
She could make up for it by challenging Cruz & Co to donate as much to such organizations as they've received in donations from the people who benefited from the shoddy procedures that caused the disaster.
Tom
Good idea.

Katie Hill on Twitter: "What a sad attempt at a photo op redemption" / Twitter

Senator Ted Cruz on Twitter: "#TexasStrong (pix link)" / Twitter
then
Josh Marshall on Twitter: "@SenTedCruz Sir, generous of you to help put the water @aoc bought into cars." / Twitter


How bad it is in some parts of the state.
Rep. Sylvia Garcia on Twitter: "This is the line to get clean water in Houston.

This line stretched miles, miles of people who do not have water to drink, cook, or clean with.

I will be volunteering at water distribution sites today, if you are able, please join us in helping our neighbors. (vid link)" / Twitter
 

crazyfingers

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Restarting Texas’ Damaged Oil Refineries Is Going to Take Weeks

Exxon Mobil Corp.’s Baytown and Beaumont plants, Marathon Petroleum Corp.’s Galveston Bay refinery and Total SE’s Port Arthur facility all face at least several weeks to resume normal operations, people familiar with the situation said. Gasoline prices at the pump could reach $3 a gallon in May as long outages crimp supply ahead of the driving season, said Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for retailer tracker GasBuddy.

The cold snap and power outages that roiled energy markets affected more than 20 oil refineries in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Crude-processing capacity fell by about 5.5 million barrels a day, according to Amrita Sen, chief oil analyst for consultant Energy Aspects Ltd.

I remember when Hurricane Katrina and Rita hit the gulf coast in 2005 we had gone to Maine for vacation. Gas was a slightly above $2/gal when we left and while we were there it skyrocketed to $4/gal. I think it was Katrina that hit end of August and prices went up while we were in Maine. And then when we are home Rita hit about a month later and they went up close to $5/gal.

Kinda strange about this recent one. Can't oil refineries have their own electric generators so that cold won't destroy the machinery? Seems to me having their own generator capacity would have cost less than all the repairs they need to make.
 

TomC

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all face at least several weeks to resume normal operations, people familiar with the situation said. Gasoline prices at the pump could reach $3 a gallon in May as long outages crimp supply ahead of the driving season, said Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for retailer tracker GasBuddy.

WTF?

Right now, in the depths of Trump virus epidemic, we're paying around 2.60/gal. That's with tons of people out of work, or working from home, or whatever.

If the Biden administration manages to boost us out of the Trump administration's mess, I fully expect gas to be $1 more per gallon by May, and the driving season.
And I live in "low cost of living" southern Indiana.

$3.60/gal. by May is a fairly optimistic guess. Unless, of course, you're a Texan oil man. Maybe Trump and Cruz can take better care of their big donors and gas will be $4 something.
Tom
 

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AOC announces that she's raised $2 million for Texas relief efforts in under 24 hours

Texas power outage: why wind turbines are not to blame - Vox - "Some Republicans want you to think wind turbines caused the Texas blackout. Here’s why they’re wrong."
Let’s get the facts straight. Every type of power plant — whether powered by coal, natural gas, nuclear, solar, or wind sources — in Texas was impacted by the ice and freezing temperatures that arrived with Winter Storm Uri over the weekend. But it was natural gas — the state’s top source of electricity — that failed most significantly as wellheads and power plants froze over. Wind turbines, meanwhile, were responsible for 13 percent of the total lost electricity output, according to the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), the state’s nonprofit grid operator.


Wayne Lawson, PhD on Twitter: "Ted Cruz continues to be a trailblazer as he becomes the first Hispanic person to flee FROM Texas TO Mexico because of ICE" / Twitter

FULL REMARKS: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez visits Texas to volunteer at Houston Food Bank - YouTube - she did a press conference, and she stated that "the whole country stands with you." The food bank's aid is for everybody, no questions asked.

AOC raises $3.2 million for Texas’ winter storm victims, volunteers at Houston food bank - YouTube
More of that press conference, including Sylvia Garcia's remarks.
 

ZiprHead

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His Lights Stayed on During Texas’ Storm. Now He Owes $16,752

SAN ANTONIO — As millions of Texans shivered in dark, cold homes over the past week while a winter storm devastated the state’s power grid and froze natural gas production, those who could still summon lights with the flick of a switch felt lucky.

Now, many of them are paying a severe price for it.

“My savings is gone,” said Scott Willoughby, a 63-year-old Army veteran who lives on Social Security payments in a Dallas suburb. He said he had nearly emptied his savings account so that he would be able to pay the $16,752 electric bill charged to his credit card — 70 times what he usually pays for all of his utilities combined. “There’s nothing I can do about it, but it’s broken me.”

Mr. Willoughby is among scores of Texans who have reported skyrocketing electric bills as the price of keeping lights on and refrigerators humming shot upward. For customers whose electricity prices are not fixed and are instead tied to the fluctuating wholesale price, the spikes have been astronomical.

The outcry elicited angry calls for action from lawmakers from both parties and prompted Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, to hold an emergency meeting with legislators on Saturday to discuss the enormous bills.

Is this how Texas turns blue, when the folks whose lights stayed on get burned too?
 

crazyfingers

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His Lights Stayed on During Texas’ Storm. Now He Owes $16,752

SAN ANTONIO — As millions of Texans shivered in dark, cold homes over the past week while a winter storm devastated the state’s power grid and froze natural gas production, those who could still summon lights with the flick of a switch felt lucky.

Now, many of them are paying a severe price for it.

“My savings is gone,” said Scott Willoughby, a 63-year-old Army veteran who lives on Social Security payments in a Dallas suburb. He said he had nearly emptied his savings account so that he would be able to pay the $16,752 electric bill charged to his credit card — 70 times what he usually pays for all of his utilities combined. “There’s nothing I can do about it, but it’s broken me.”

Mr. Willoughby is among scores of Texans who have reported skyrocketing electric bills as the price of keeping lights on and refrigerators humming shot upward. For customers whose electricity prices are not fixed and are instead tied to the fluctuating wholesale price, the spikes have been astronomical.

The outcry elicited angry calls for action from lawmakers from both parties and prompted Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, to hold an emergency meeting with legislators on Saturday to discuss the enormous bills.

Is this how Texas turns blue, when the folks whose lights stayed on get burned too?

But don't you know it's Biden's fault?

https://www.rawstory.com/larry-kudlow-joe-biden/
 
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