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The Humanist Ten Commitments again

lpetrich

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The Humanist Ten Commitments?
Living Humanist Values: The Ten Commitments - TheHumanist.com

I want to update it, but it's an old thread, and I'm starting a new one. Its list is a reworded version of the earlier one:
  1. Critical Thinking
  2. Ethical Development
  3. Peace and Social Justice
  4. Service and Participation
  5. Empathy
  6. Humility
  7. Environmentalism
  8. Global Awareness
  9. Responsibility
  10. Altruism

Here are some more:

Amsterdam Declaration 1952 - Humanists International
  1. It is democratic.
  2. It seeks to use science creatively, not destructively.
  3. Humanism is ethical.
  4. It insists that personal liberty is an end that must be combined with social responsibility in order that it shall not be sacrificed to the improvement of material conditions.
  5. It is a way of life, aiming at the maximum possible fulfilment, through the cultivation of ethical and creative living.

The Amsterdam Declaration - Humanists International
  1. Humanism is ethical.
  2. Humanism is rational.
  3. Humanism supports democracy and human rights.
  4. Humanism insists that personal liberty must be combined with social responsibility.
  5. Humanism is a response to the widespread demand for an alternative to dogmatic religion.
  6. Humanism values artistic creativity and imagination and recognises the transforming power of art.
  7. Humanism is a lifestance aiming at the maximum possible fulfilment
 

lpetrich

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Humanist Manifesto I - American Humanist Association - 1933
  1. Religious humanists regard the universe as self-existing and not created.
  2. Humanism believes that man is a part of nature and that he has emerged as a result of a continuous process.
  3. Holding an organic view of life, humanists find that the traditional dualism of mind and body must be rejected.
  4. Humanism recognizes that man’s religious culture and civilization, ... are the product of a gradual development due to his interaction with his natural environment and with his social heritage. ...
  5. Humanism asserts that the nature of the universe depicted by modern science makes unacceptable any supernatural or cosmic guarantees of human values. ...
  6. We are convinced that the time has passed for theism, deism, modernism, and the several varieties of “new thought”.
  7. Religion consists of those actions, purposes, and experiences which are humanly significant. ...
  8. Religious Humanism considers the complete realization of human personality to be the end of man’s life and seeks its development and fulfillment in the here and now. ...
  9. In the place of the old attitudes involved in worship and prayer the humanist finds his religious emotions expressed in a heightened sense of personal life and in a cooperative effort to promote social well-being.
  10. It follows that there will be no uniquely religious emotions and attitudes of the kind hitherto associated with belief in the supernatural.
  11. Man will learn to face the crises of life in terms of his knowledge of their naturalness and probability. ...
  12. Believing that religion must work increasingly for joy in living, religious humanists aim to foster the creative in man and to encourage achievements that add to the satisfactions of life.
  13. Religious humanism maintains that all associations and institutions exist for the fulfillment of human life. ...
  14. The humanists are firmly convinced that existing acquisitive and profit-motivated society has shown itself to be inadequate and that a radical change in methods, controls, and motives must be instituted. ...
  15. We assert that humanism will: (a) affirm life rather than deny it; (b) seek to elicit the possibilities of life, not flee from them; and (c) endeavor to establish the conditions of a satisfactory life for all, not merely for the few. By this positive morale and intention humanism will be guided, and from this perspective and alignment the techniques and efforts of humanism will flow.
 

lpetrich

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Humanist Manifesto II - American Humanist Association - 1973
  1. ... We believe, however, that traditional dogmatic or authoritarian religions that place revelation, God, ritual, or creed above human needs and experience do a disservice to the human species. ...
  2. Promises of immortal salvation or fear of eternal damnation are both illusory and harmful. ...
  3. We affirm that moral values derive their source from human experience. ...
  4. Reason and intelligence are the most effective instruments that humankind possesses. ...
  5. The preciousness and dignity of the individual person is a central humanist value. ...
  6. In the area of sexuality, we believe that intolerant attitudes, often cultivated by orthodox religions and puritanical cultures, unduly repress sexual conduct. ...
  7. To enhance freedom and dignity the individual must experience a full range of civil liberties in all societies. ...
  8. We are committed to an open and democratic society. ...
  9. The separation of church and state and the separation of ideology and state are imperatives. ...
  10. Humane societies should evaluate economic systems not by rhetoric or ideology, but by whether or not they increase economic well-being for all individuals and groups, minimize poverty and hardship, increase the sum of human satisfaction, and enhance the quality of life. ...
  11. The principle of moral equality must be furthered through elimination of all discrimination based upon race, religion, sex, age, or national origin. ...
  12. We deplore the division of humankind on nationalistic grounds. ...
  13. This world community must renounce the resort to violence and force as a method of solving international disputes. ...
  14. The world community must engage in cooperative planning concerning the use of rapidly depleting resources. ...
  15. The problems of economic growth and development can no longer be resolved by one nation alone; they are worldwide in scope. ...
  16. Technology is a vital key to human progress and development. ...
  17. We must expand communication and transportation across frontiers. ...
  18. The world cannot wait for a reconciliation of competing political or economic systems to solve its problems. ...
 

lpetrich

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Humanism and Its Aspirations: Humanist Manifesto III, a Successor to the Humanist Manifesto of 1933 - American Humanist Association
  1. Knowledge of the world is derived by observation, experimentation, and rational analysis. ...
  2. Humans are an integral part of nature, the result of unguided evolutionary change. ...
  3. Ethical values are derived from human need and interest as tested by experience. ...
  4. Life’s fulfillment emerges from individual participation in the service of humane ideals. ...
  5. Humans are social by nature and find meaning in relationships. ...
  6. Working to benefit society maximizes individual happiness. ...

The US Green Party:

The Four Pillars - www.gp.org
Peace, Ecology, Social Justice, Democracy

Four Pillars Ten Key Values GPUS
  1. Grassroots Democracy
  2. Social Justice and Equal Opportunity
  3. Ecological Wisdom
  4. Non-Violence
  5. Decentralization
  6. Community-Based Economics and Economic Justice
  7. Feminism and Gender Equity
  8. Respect For Diversity
  9. Personal and Global Responsibility
  10. Future Focus and Sustainability

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Instagram: “Yesterday we celebrated back-to-school by sharing backpacks and school supplies with families across the district. From local parks to…” - a sweet little message, where she advised:
  • Be curious
  • Be kind
  • Be diligent / practice
Covering three of the Big Five personality traits: Openness, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness. The others are Extroversion, Neuroticism.
 

lpetrich

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10 new improved and far better commandments • Skeptical Science
  1. Be open minded and be willing to alter your beliefs with new evidence.
  2. Strive to understand what is most likely to be true, not to believe what you wish to be true.
  3. The scientific method is the most reliable way of understanding the natural world.
  4. Every person has the right to control over their body.
  5. God is not necessary to be a good person or to live a full and meaningful life.
  6. Be mindful of the consequences of all your actions and recognise that you must take responsibility for them.
  7. Treat others as you would want them to treat you and can reasonably expect them to want to be treated. Think about their perspective.
  8. We have the responsibility to consider others including future generations
  9. There is no one right way to live.
  10. Leave the world a better place than you found it.

Reviewing a Christian response to the atheist ten non-commandments • Skeptical Science - "So the bottom line here is that he has indeed made a decent attempt to evaluate it all, basically agrees with it all, and yet is also clearly struggling to retain his religious beliefs in that context because he feels that he still needs a belief in a god."
 

T.G.G. Moogly

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I would only add that tenet 5 above should be stated in the plural. Gods are not necessary ...
 

Lion IRC

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I would only add that tenet 5 above should be stated in the plural. Gods are not necessary ...

#5 Is irrelevant because because being 'good' means different things to different people.
 

abaddon

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#5 Is irrelevant because because being 'good' means different things to different people.

"Being 'good'" goes on meaning what it means to people with or without God's opinion added into the mix. It's relevant so long as there are people. The only relevancy in doubt is God's relevancy to what "good" is.
 

rousseau

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These commandments don't sound essentially different in nature from the commandments of actual religions, but with science in place of a divine being.

I'll take the post-humanist commandments:
- Do whatever you want to do
- Realize that your actions have consequences
- Actually think critically about your own behavior given context, rather than relying on static rules
 

rousseau

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1. OP is commitments

2. doing whatever isn't a commitment or commandment it's an extreme epicure description

3. Who cares about Humanists anyway. Seems all that leads to commitment is difference.

Sorry. It's late.

How did I miss that? But what is a prescription to commit but something commanded with social pressure? See?? I can weasel myself out of any hole.

Seriously, there's some good stuff, but it sounds like we're praying to Dawkins now.

Doing what one wants isn't epicurean-ism, it's freedom. Ethics either exists within you, or it doesn't. And even when it does, we all have limits.
 

Jolly_Penguin

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I've never liked the term "Humanism". It seems very arrogant and self-serving to push forth the idea that humans are noble creatures. We often aren't. Humans are often scum, and it is no more human to be nice than it is human to be nasty. I dislike "Humane" for the same reason. It is bigotry at the species level.
 

rousseau

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I'm of the opinion that humanism mainly grew as a secular movement in response to the overwhelming force of religion in most societies. Humanism is primarily anti-religious.

But at the same time it has the same elements of religion:
- we're ethically superior because we believe in [x] (reason / science) instead of [y] (God)
- we abide by a moral code that presumes [x] (reason / science) is what is good and just in the world, and is the closest thing to our savior

Maybe that's an improvement over relying on a deity, but if I were to build a humanist ideology I'd try to distance myself from the notion that science / technology is anything more than an amoral tool.

I don't know, in my experience at this forum and with humanist groups, I get the picture of smug academics looking down on the unwashed masses who just haven't seen the light yet. Sounds familiar.
 

rousseau

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Well there we go. Any justification is 'religion'. Down to just a few words now. Come, go, start, stop, right left, justify, divide and the last, a salad, "... and a partridge in a pear tree". rat tat bumpf! crash!!

Tinkle ...

Well in some sense it is a religion founded on a metaphysical possibility - that God doesn't exist.

Many secular people are inactive - they don't care about promoting values and have a live and let live attitude. Whereas humanists are organized around a central metaphysical thesis - God doesn't exist, reason is king.

You don't need to call it a religion if you don't want to, but it looks similar to me. And it's ethics also aren't entirely different from that of theistic religions, except God doesn't play a part.

I'm not just being a contrarian here, I decided not to join our local humanists for this reason.
 

fromderinside

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Mine is a personal life system based on verifiable operations appropriate for living a life where transactions are positive to all parties one encounters within it. I call that objective the good life. Whether I believe anything is guided by the extent to which it is verifiable. Ethics are guides for executing transactions. My ethics modifiable. They are modifiable by whether my transactions are verifiable as positive. I don't think falling short of an ideal (positive transactions) is religion.
 

rousseau

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Mine is a personal life system based on verifiable operations appropriate for living a life where transactions are positive to all parties one encounters within it. I call that objective the good life. Whether I believe anything is guided by the extent to which it is verifiable. Ethics are guides for executing transactions. My ethics modifiable. They are modifiable by whether my transactions are verifiable as positive. I don't think falling short of an ideal (positive transactions) is religion.

That's an interesting way of putting it, sounds like enlightened self-interest. I believe many of us also live with a scarcity mindset, where we don't realize that there's enough to go around and there's more to gain by helping each other out, than stealing and cheating.

Another light, but well-said maxim: 'relationships are like bank accounts, you can't take out more than you put in'
 

steve_bank

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How can there be a non dogmatic morality? The lists themselves form a dogma or ideology.

The question is who sets the rules, punishments, and the moral boundaries. The modern progressives get around responsibility by simply saying most everything is ok. Anything offensive to anyone is immoral.

Without specifics any -ism as good as any other. People conform it to their own views and needs.
 

Politesse

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Humility?

That one's ironic.

The very name of the movement strongly implies that adherents themselves the only people who care about humans...

I like a lot of things about humanism, but (also ironically) most of the things I like about it are qualities and virtues that are pretty much found in every religious tradition, as this list indeed attests to.
 

southernhybrid

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I'm of the opinion that humanism mainly grew as a secular movement in response to the overwhelming force of religion in most societies. Humanism is primarily anti-religious.

But at the same time it has the same elements of religion:
- we're ethically superior because we believe in [x] (reason / science) instead of [y] (God)
- we abide by a moral code that presumes [x] (reason / science) is what is good and just in the world, and is the closest thing to our savior

Maybe that's an improvement over relying on a deity, but if I were to build a humanist ideology I'd try to distance myself from the notion that science / technology is anything more than an amoral tool.

I don't know, in my experience at this forum and with humanist groups, I get the picture of smug academics looking down on the unwashed masses who just haven't seen the light yet. Sounds familiar.

I suppose there are "humanists" who are smug academics, but I was once a member of a now defunct group called, "Humanists of Georgia." Only one was an academic and you couldn't imagine a more humble man. He hated being referred to as doctor and was extremely down to earth. The rest of us were an assortment of odd balls. Some had college degrees, while some were high school graduates. Nobody was in the least bit arrogant. And, the Humanist label wasn't taken too seriously. It was just about trying to live a decent life without intentionally harming anyone else.

We sometimes had guest speakers who were from academia, but I have no idea if any of them were atheists to humanists. Actually, one of our best speakers was a Christian who was also a professor of history. He loved speaking to our group because we were more open minded than most of his students. We also had a Geology professor who gave us a lecture on global climate change. He was excellent and explained things using charts and actual evidence. The group eventually died out, primarily because we all lived quite far apart from each other. When we ended the group, we took the several thousand dollars that we had and donated to Atlanta Freethought Society, which is still a very active group.

I attended the last meeting of AFS, and the Black Non believers of Atlanta joined with us. There was a young Christian who was in seminary who visited and asked a lot of questions. He apologized for asking questions, but we told him we loved it when people honestly wanted to discuss religion with us. It was a very interesting, friendly meeting. I even barged my way into a photo of the Black Non believers. I told them they needed a token white girl in the photo. They all laughed and had me join them. So, I think you may have the wrong idea about humanists and assorted atheists who have organizations.

I grew up attending a large evangelical church. The arrogance there was overwhelming, and guess what? Some of them were highly educated academic types,. One man had a seat on the New York Stock exchange, another one had an appointment with the UN, several were engineers or scientists, but they all knew they were "saved" and the rest of society was going to hell. It doesn't get more arrogant that that, does it?
 

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I've never liked the term "Humanism". It seems very arrogant and self-serving to push forth the idea that humans are noble creatures. We often aren't. Humans are often scum, and it is no more human to be nice than it is human to be nasty. I dislike "Humane" for the same reason. It is bigotry at the species level.

Elephants and whales are my favorite animals. Intelligent, largely peaceful animals. Very different from Homo sapiens.
 

Tammuz

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I'm of the opinion that humanism mainly grew as a secular movement in response to the overwhelming force of religion in most societies. Humanism is primarily anti-religious.

I'm not sure I agree with your other points, but I think this one is correct. When looking at countries in which humanist organizations are strong, it is typically the case that in those countries, there is strong influence of religion that humanist groups are fighting against.
 

rousseau

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I'm of the opinion that humanism mainly grew as a secular movement in response to the overwhelming force of religion in most societies. Humanism is primarily anti-religious.

But at the same time it has the same elements of religion:
- we're ethically superior because we believe in [x] (reason / science) instead of [y] (God)
- we abide by a moral code that presumes [x] (reason / science) is what is good and just in the world, and is the closest thing to our savior

Maybe that's an improvement over relying on a deity, but if I were to build a humanist ideology I'd try to distance myself from the notion that science / technology is anything more than an amoral tool.

I don't know, in my experience at this forum and with humanist groups, I get the picture of smug academics looking down on the unwashed masses who just haven't seen the light yet. Sounds familiar.

I suppose there are "humanists" who are smug academics, but I was once a member of a now defunct group called, "Humanists of Georgia." Only one was an academic and you couldn't imagine a more humble man. He hated being referred to as doctor and was extremely down to earth. The rest of us were an assortment of odd balls. Some had college degrees, while some were high school graduates. Nobody was in the least bit arrogant. And, the Humanist label wasn't taken too seriously. It was just about trying to live a decent life without intentionally harming anyone else.

We sometimes had guest speakers who were from academia, but I have no idea if any of them were atheists to humanists. Actually, one of our best speakers was a Christian who was also a professor of history. He loved speaking to our group because we were more open minded than most of his students. We also had a Geology professor who gave us a lecture on global climate change. He was excellent and explained things using charts and actual evidence. The group eventually died out, primarily because we all lived quite far apart from each other. When we ended the group, we took the several thousand dollars that we had and donated to Atlanta Freethought Society, which is still a very active group.

I attended the last meeting of AFS, and the Black Non believers of Atlanta joined with us. There was a young Christian who was in seminary who visited and asked a lot of questions. He apologized for asking questions, but we told him we loved it when people honestly wanted to discuss religion with us. It was a very interesting, friendly meeting. I even barged my way into a photo of the Black Non believers. I told them they needed a token white girl in the photo. They all laughed and had me join them. So, I think you may have the wrong idea about humanists and assorted atheists who have organizations.

I grew up attending a large evangelical church. The arrogance there was overwhelming, and guess what? Some of them were highly educated academic types,. One man had a seat on the New York Stock exchange, another one had an appointment with the UN, several were engineers or scientists, but they all knew they were "saved" and the rest of society was going to hell. It doesn't get more arrogant that that, does it?

Maybe I do need to give them more of a chance. The only impression I got of my local humanist group was via their Facebook page which was quite militant, and some of the topics they discussed at their meetings which were also quite militant. That was the main turn-off for me - the crusade against unreason. But then, I guess you need some tangible reason to actually get together beyond 'we're not religious' so let's hang out. People do things.

Personally, I find myself more attracted to people who are politically inactive and who just want to live an average, unexceptional life. They have no pretensions about 'changing the world', they just get on with it. Somehow I find these people more intuitively rational than those who are engaged in politics. They realize that they really can't accomplish much so they just don't try, and end up avoiding the grandiosity of activism.

But then, my local humanist group may be rife with people like that. Maybe I should give it a shot.
 

steve_bank

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Humility?

That one's ironic.

The very name of the movement strongly implies that adherents themselves the only people who care about humans...

I like a lot of things about humanism, but (also ironically) most of the things I like about it are qualities and virtues that are pretty much found in every religious tradition, as this list indeed attests to.

You have it bass ackwards. It is the Christians who manifest a sense of superiority over non believers.
 

Politesse

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Humility?

That one's ironic.

The very name of the movement strongly implies that adherents themselves the only people who care about humans...

I like a lot of things about humanism, but (also ironically) most of the things I like about it are qualities and virtues that are pretty much found in every religious tradition, as this list indeed attests to.

You have it bass ackwards. It is the Christians who manifest a sense of superiority over non believers.

Oh, no one has a monopoly on arrogance.
 

fromderinside

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Whaaat? Just like a Chreeeestion sticking to dogma over principle. Praaze da lard - I'm seeing a three hundred pound barbeque man pumping fist right after his son, and side off the ham, bashes a 135 lb kid in Friday Night Lights - chillen 'cause Gawd waurks in missterius waze.
 

steve_bank

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Humility?

That one's ironic.

The very name of the movement strongly implies that adherents themselves the only people who care about humans...

I like a lot of things about humanism, but (also ironically) most of the things I like about it are qualities and virtues that are pretty much found in every religious tradition, as this list indeed attests to.

You have it bass ackwards. It is the Christians who manifest a sense of superiority over non believers.

Oh, no one has a monopoly on arrogance.

Christian arrogance is based on the belief of being an agent of a god empowered to dispense morality.
 

southernhybrid

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I'm of the opinion that humanism mainly grew as a secular movement in response to the overwhelming force of religion in most societies. Humanism is primarily anti-religious.

But at the same time it has the same elements of religion:
- we're ethically superior because we believe in [x] (reason / science) instead of [y] (God)
- we abide by a moral code that presumes [x] (reason / science) is what is good and just in the world, and is the closest thing to our savior

Maybe that's an improvement over relying on a deity, but if I were to build a humanist ideology I'd try to distance myself from the notion that science / technology is anything more than an amoral tool.

I don't know, in my experience at this forum and with humanist groups, I get the picture of smug academics looking down on the unwashed masses who just haven't seen the light yet. Sounds familiar.

I suppose there are "humanists" who are smug academics, but I was once a member of a now defunct group called, "Humanists of Georgia." Only one was an academic and you couldn't imagine a more humble man. He hated being referred to as doctor and was extremely down to earth. The rest of us were an assortment of odd balls. Some had college degrees, while some were high school graduates. Nobody was in the least bit arrogant. And, the Humanist label wasn't taken too seriously. It was just about trying to live a decent life without intentionally harming anyone else.

We sometimes had guest speakers who were from academia, but I have no idea if any of them were atheists to humanists. Actually, one of our best speakers was a Christian who was also a professor of history. He loved speaking to our group because we were more open minded than most of his students. We also had a Geology professor who gave us a lecture on global climate change. He was excellent and explained things using charts and actual evidence. The group eventually died out, primarily because we all lived quite far apart from each other. When we ended the group, we took the several thousand dollars that we had and donated to Atlanta Freethought Society, which is still a very active group.

I attended the last meeting of AFS, and the Black Non believers of Atlanta joined with us. There was a young Christian who was in seminary who visited and asked a lot of questions. He apologized for asking questions, but we told him we loved it when people honestly wanted to discuss religion with us. It was a very interesting, friendly meeting. I even barged my way into a photo of the Black Non believers. I told them they needed a token white girl in the photo. They all laughed and had me join them. So, I think you may have the wrong idea about humanists and assorted atheists who have organizations.

I grew up attending a large evangelical church. The arrogance there was overwhelming, and guess what? Some of them were highly educated academic types,. One man had a seat on the New York Stock exchange, another one had an appointment with the UN, several were engineers or scientists, but they all knew they were "saved" and the rest of society was going to hell. It doesn't get more arrogant that that, does it?

Maybe I do need to give them more of a chance. The only impression I got of my local humanist group was via their Facebook page which was quite militant, and some of the topics they discussed at their meetings which were also quite militant. That was the main turn-off for me - the crusade against unreason. But then, I guess you need some tangible reason to actually get together beyond 'we're not religious' so let's hang out. People do things.

Personally, I find myself more attracted to people who are politically inactive and who just want to live an average, unexceptional life. They have no pretensions about 'changing the world', they just get on with it. Somehow I find these people more intuitively rational than those who are engaged in politics. They realize that they really can't accomplish much so they just don't try, and end up avoiding the grandiosity of activism.

But then, my local humanist group may be rife with people like that. Maybe I should give it a shot.

It's certainly possible that you wouldn't like your local group. There's a libertarian atheist group in Atlanta that I'm sure I wouldn't feel comfortable hanging out with, so atheists come in a variety of different types, just like any other group. Our little local group isn't very active, but we are an extremely odd group of people. But, atheist or not, I've always enjoyed being around people who I have little in common with. It's boring always being around people who are a lot like yourself, imo. Some of my favorite people are the black Christian women who I spend time with at the local senior center. We have a lot in common when it comes to politics, but our backgrounds and experiences are extremely different from each other.
 

Jolly_Penguin

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Skeptic
I've never liked the term "Humanism". It seems very arrogant and self-serving to push forth the idea that humans are noble creatures. We often aren't. Humans are often scum, and it is no more human to be nice than it is human to be nasty. I dislike "Humane" for the same reason. It is bigotry at the species level.

Elephants and whales are my favorite animals. Intelligent, largely peaceful animals. Very different from Homo sapiens.

Yes. Dogs are better than humans too. How am I supposed to call myself a "humanist" and feel like that's a good thing while chatting with a dog, whale, or elephant?
 

arkirk

Veteran Member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
3,403
Location
San Antonio, Texas
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atheist/agnostic
We all know when we are over the line in terms of passionate expression of our rights over those of others. That however is the basis of our demise. When we get too passionate about anything we seem almost to a man (and to a woman) to forget that our civilization is merely a thin veneer over very powerful pleasure and displeasure machines which have been frustrated more often than satisfied. We know when our anger and frustration may drive us into terrible actions but it appears we do not know it with enough self governing authority. Civilization may be just a veneer, but it is an all important one. We possess the capacity to perpetrate terrible acts that are destructive to huge swaths of our environment and community and it is only the strength of our veneer of civilization that holds these powers in check. I feel our government with all its bitter competitive fury has fallen into the hands of those who do not respect the importance of being civil in a human sense. What I am driving at here is the absolute necessity for the veneer to remain intact in the full light of whatever turns out to be the truth. Civilization is Applied Humanism. Any of these codes in this thread are okay as long as we choose to be civilized and to maintain kindness and love not only for our fellow man but the very ground on which we stand.
 

arkirk

Veteran Member
Joined
May 27, 2005
Messages
3,403
Location
San Antonio, Texas
Basic Beliefs
atheist/agnostic
I've never liked the term "Humanism". It seems very arrogant and self-serving to push forth the idea that humans are noble creatures. We often aren't. Humans are often scum, and it is no more human to be nice than it is human to be nasty. I dislike "Humane" for the same reason. It is bigotry at the species level.

Elephants and whales are my favorite animals. Intelligent, largely peaceful animals. Very different from Homo sapiens.

Yes. Dogs are better than humans too. How am I supposed to call myself a "humanist" and feel like that's a good thing while chatting with a dog, whale, or elephant?

Sorry, Jolly Penguin, it is just that a dog can be your best friend without saying a word.:dog:
 
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