• Welcome to the new Internet Infidels Discussion Board, formerly Talk Freethought.
  • 2021 Internet Infidels Fundraising Drive
    Greetings! Time for the annual fundraiser.Sorry for the late update, we normally start this early in October. Funds are needed to keep II and IIDB online. I was not able to get an IIDB based donations addon implemented for this year, I will make sure to have that done for next year. You can help support II in several ways, please visit the Support Us page for more info. Or just click:

    I will try to track all donations from IIDB. Many thanks to those that have already donated. The current total is $923. If everyone dontated just $5, we would easily hit our goal.

What are you reading?

Jimmy Higgins

Contributor
Joined
Feb 1, 2001
Messages
33,465
Basic Beliefs
Calvinistic Atheist
Finished Tiamat's Wrath, and boy was Tiamat wrathful! Really a great title as it isn't quite obvious who the metaphor is for, the literal Tiamat like thing or the empire which has a Tiamat like presence compared to all else. So now I have a better idea where the final book is heading, though not entirely clear. Book 8 also does help explain Holden's opening thoughts on the angry protomolecule thing in Season Five.

I did have one question, spoiler.

Timothy. So was that supposed to be a surprise? Because when she was hiking out to meet Timothy, I knew at that point it had to be Amos, the author laid it out very clearly. In fact, I was then disappointed in myself that I hadn't figured it out when she first met Timothy because I then recalled that was his original name. But then when finally meets Timothy, the author doesn't try to hide anything. He talks, looks, acts like Amos. So when "It's a fake!!!" moment happens, I'm thinking, umm... yeah. A surprise for Teresa, but not me.



Feels like Season 6 will be Books 6 and 8 smooshed together (I don't think they have time to cover the events of Book 7), with dashes of Book 9 to close things up.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
11,821
Location
Canada
Basic Beliefs
Realist
History of the Balkans from Mohammed the Conqueror to Stalin. It's a bit of a data dump with long, sprawling paragraphs that are difficult to read, but there didn't seem to be many other books on the region in Weldon. Still an interesting title.

Feminist Philosophies A - Z by Nancy McHugh. I bought this today (had been looking for something similar for a while). I'd always wanted to have all the strands of feminism pulled together in a single title, and this one is an encyclopedia of sorts, which works. I'm definitely sympathetic to feminism (or at least the plight of women), but while reading it I found myself deconstructing many of the ideas in it. But from the perspective of anthropology it's a great read.

Confucian Analects, The Great Learning, The Doctrine of the Mean translated by James Legge. Also bought this today. It's a 19th century translation of the works of Confucius by a missionary who learned a bit of Chinese and travelled there. Mostly I'm starting to collect a nice set of Eastern philosophy and I thought the Analects would make a nice addition. But I am interested in the Analects themselves (also from the perspective of Anthropology). I don't have much of a sense of the book as a historical artifact, but might dig into that a bit soon.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
11,821
Location
Canada
Basic Beliefs
Realist
I had three days off this week and decided to dive into my copy of Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy. Mainly I wanted to trace the sociology I've been reading back through it's roots, ending at the Renaissance. I also bought a text on Ancient Greek philosophy and have been browsing through that a bit. Both titles not so much for their ideas, but to get a better sense of our history of ideas.

I ended up noticing that both Eastern and Western philosophy seemed to go through a similar progression away from dualism and toward materialism, which makes sense if we're trying to figure things out.

I also bought a trophy copy of Maps of Time by David Christian yesterday. I already own it on my e-reader but thought it'd be a nice addition to my physical collection, and that I'd enjoy being able to browse through it. It was a huge influence back in 2016.
 

Mediancat

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 18, 2002
Messages
1,135
Location
Maryland, USA
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
The biography of Rhodes was exhaustive, and called him out on his villainy.

Have moved on now to Pup Fiction, a light mystery, and after that I'm going to read some Philo Vance novels.

Rob
 

Politesse

Sapere aude
Joined
Feb 27, 2018
Messages
7,220
Location
Chochenyo Territory, US
Gender
any
Basic Beliefs
Jedi Wayseeker
I've just started in on Graeber and Wengrow's The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity. The title is lightly satirical; they are more critiquing than explicating the "dawn of everything", poking well-deserved holes in the artificial horizons European historians have tried to invoke between history and prehistory. So far it reminds me thematically of Europe and the People Without History, but their style and academic foundation are far superior to that of Eric Wolf's (rip!), and we also a lot more about the "Neolithic" world now than when the older work was published. It's a real door-stopper, so I'm looking forward to many more nights enjoying the volume. It's a pity we've lost Dave Graeber last year, before everyone had a chance to embarass themselves trying to critique this book to his face. As scholar, he was always fun to watch. I only met him in person once, but I will miss him. And his mentor Marshall Sahlins, one right after another. Too many lately.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
11,821
Location
Canada
Basic Beliefs
Realist
Yesterday I offloaded a few library books and picked up How to Think Like an Anthropologist, another recommendation from Politesse. I brought back my Bringhurst philosophy, Wisdom Sits in Places, and Ibn Battuta in Black Africa. All three were solid books, but I wasn't feeling them at the moment.

I'm finding myself leaning back toward the heavily academic lately, dry and precise writing that says a lot in a small amount of space. How to Think Like an Anthropologist isn't quite that, but does look like it will offer a lot of unfamiliar perspective and novelty which I'm enjoying.
 

spikepipsqueak

My Brane Hertz
Staff member
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
4,294
Location
Victoria
Basic Beliefs
humanist
I can't figure out how I got to be 64 but had never run across Ion Idriess.

Did something I rarely do and put down Texas Hold 'em about 10% in.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
11,821
Location
Canada
Basic Beliefs
Realist
Two separate copies of the Tao Te Ching, one translated by Stephen Mitchell and the other Ellen Chen. I'd owned Mitchell's version for a few months and finally picked it up off my shelf recently. I was surprised how much I enjoyed it so did some research into the Tao Te Ching in general, which led me to Chen's translation.

She produced more of a scholarly work with a history of Lao Tzu and the text, a truer translation, and quite a bit of commentary on the passages themselves. Where Mitchell's is a straight translation that seems more sympathetic to the Zen side of things.

Both great books, but I'm enjoying Chen's history and analysis. Information that really can't be found online.
 

Mediancat

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 18, 2002
Messages
1,135
Location
Maryland, USA
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
To go from the sublime to the less so, I just finished the most recent Rhys Bowen Royal Spyness mystery -- the conceit is that of an impoverished distant relation of the British Royal Family essentially solves mysteries at the behest of the Queen of England in the 1930s.

Rob
 

spikepipsqueak

My Brane Hertz
Staff member
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Messages
4,294
Location
Victoria
Basic Beliefs
humanist
They could at least have paid a little attention. England had a King for all of the 1930s.

ijust had a lovely surprise. In the Time Traveller's Almanac I came across an Ursula leGuin short story I hadn't read before.
 

Toni

Contributor
Joined
Aug 11, 2011
Messages
12,988
Location
NOT laying back and thinking of England
Basic Beliefs
Peace on Earth, goodwill towards all
Picking up Mom Genes: Inside the Science of Our Ancient Maternal Instinct by Abigail Tucker. I started it back in May and then got side tracked with a lot of house projects and left this on the shelf...

I have a lot of stuff on my shelves I need to get to.
 

bilby

Fair dinkum thinkum
Joined
Mar 7, 2007
Messages
25,430
Location
The Sunshine State: The one with Crocs, not Gators
Gender
He/Him
Basic Beliefs
Strong Atheist
They could at least have paid a little attention. England had a King for all of the 1930s
Having a queen as monarch precludes the existence of a king; But not the other way around.

Wikipedia said:
Mary of Teck (Victoria Mary Augusta Louise Olga Pauline Claudine Agnes; 26 May 1867 – 24 March 1953) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Empress of India, from 6 May 1910 until 29 January 1936 as the wife of King-Emperor George V.

Wikipedia said:
Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was Queen of the United Kingdom and the Dominions from 11 December 1936 to 6 February 1952 as the wife of King George VI. She was the last Empress of India from her husband's accession as King-Emperor in 1936 until 15 August 1947, when the British Raj was dissolved. After her husband died, she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter, Queen Elizabeth II.

The only time in the 1930s when England did not have a queen was the brief reign of Edward VIII, between January and December of 1936.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
11,821
Location
Canada
Basic Beliefs
Realist
African Religions: A Very Short Introduction

This is my first title in this series, I thought it'd be interesting seeing such a broad topic summed up concisely. I like it a lot, it's refreshing to read a title on Africa that's actually written by an African. Now I'm debating splurging on Nkrumah's Neo-Colonialism.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
11,821
Location
Canada
Basic Beliefs
Realist
I'll have to go through the series list in this title and see if any others pique my interest. Way back when I considered the introduction on Marx, but still haven't gone there.

We might also have the Introduction to Racism kicking around from a former tenant. I can't recall if I got rid of it or not.
 

Mediancat

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jun 18, 2002
Messages
1,135
Location
Maryland, USA
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
They could at least have paid a little attention. England had a King for all of the 1930s.
As Bilby noted, it also had a queen for the majority of the decade. She wasn't the reigning monarch, but Queen Mary -- who was the queen in question -- is the one being referred to in my brief summary.

Rob
 

Rhea

Cyborg with a Tiara
Staff member
Joined
Feb 1, 2001
Messages
12,475
Location
Recluse
Basic Beliefs
Humanist
Miss Benson’s Beetle. Reading with my book club. It’s a fun read.
 
Top Bottom