• Welcome to the new Internet Infidels Discussion Board, formerly Talk Freethought.

When one is depressed is it true one turns inward. Is that necessary. Is it good to do so.

ruby sparks

Contributor
Joined
Nov 24, 2017
Messages
9,167
Location
Northern Ireland
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
I think it goes with the territory, as in it’s a very common symptom.

Introspection is like most things, you can indulge in too much or too little of it, imo.

The problem with introspection during depression is that it tends to involve negative thoughts and personal judgements. I speak from experience.

As such it can reinforce the problem, because if you are depressed you are not the best judge of things.

Of course, it could be that those prone to introspection are then more prone to depression, rather than the other way around. Or perhaps it’s a two-way thing. But I don’t think a tendency for introspection is necessarily, of itself, a cause of depression.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
By one turning inward one needn't be introspecting. One may just be looking for excuses that depression is a reality based feeling. Perhaps a cycle of deceits. As for connecting depression with introspection one is proving that introspection isn't valid research.

just sayin'
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
12,148
Depends how many beers I had on the weekend. I used to be firmly in the 'you can't decide to be happy' camp, but now I'm not so much with the caveat that overcoming a depressed physical state cognitively takes solid expertise in mindfulness techniques. I spent about 6 months studying ACT and Zen, which are opposites of the same coin, and they help tremendously. Some without such mental tools don't do as well.

But then there's mild depression and there's my life is in ruins depression, or diagnosed chronic depression. I think that's an important distinction.

Lately I only experience the former, but if, for example, my wife died in childbirth along with my son I would turn inward for a long time.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
We've got all these nice little 'good feel' drugs coursing through our systems. Might as well corral them somehow. Deciding and acting 'being happy' is one that works for many. Much better than letting the other kind dominate.

I'd expect you'd turn inward for about as much time as it takes to whistle 'blowinin the wind' then you'd steady yersef and begin 'movin on'.

again, just sayin'

I'm not predicting nature here. Just observing outcomes.
Loss, Trauma, and Human Resilience http://www.public.asu.edu/~iacmao/PGS191/Resilience Reading #1A.pdf


Many people are exposed to loss or potentially traumatic events at some point in their lives, and yet they continue to have positive emotional experiences and show only minor and transient disruptions in their ability to function. Unfortunately, because much of psychology’s knowledge about how adults cope with loss or trauma has come from individuals who sought treatment or exhibited great distress, loss and trauma theorists have often viewed this typeof resilience as either rare or pathological. The author challenges these assumptions by reviewing evidence that resilience represents a distinct trajectory from the process of recovery, that resilience in the face of loss or potential trauma is more common than is often believed, and that there are multiple and sometimes unexpected pathways to resilience.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
12,148
You may be right. It wouldn't take that long, it's a little more static and impermanent than something like being a social outcast or homeless.

My larger point is that certain circumstances may make it impossible to not think negatively. Being able to avoid turning inward may depend on your mental ability to let anxiety dissipate, as well as the severity of the depression. In some cases, physical, chronic depression warps the mind, in other cases life circumstances are so bad that it's near impossible to stay positive.

But don't forget that the feelings of solitude and isolation have a kind of survival value for many, a feature, not a bug. They force us to seek companions rather than being content with our dearth of life circumstances.

I agree with you, not necessary, and avoidable for the strong, but most of us aren't the strong.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
My larger point is that certain circumstances may make it impossible to not think negatively. Being able to avoid turning inward may depend on your mental ability to let anxiety dissipate, as well as the severity of the depression. In some cases, physical, chronic depression warps the mind, in other cases life circumstances are so bad that it's near impossible to stay positive.

But don't forget that the feelings of solitude and isolation have a kind of survival value for many, a feature, not a bug. They force us to seek companions rather than being content with our dearth of life circumstances.

My life for about two years after we left FSU with dissertation data accumulated and writing underway is a circumstance right out of your book or horrors. Depression was so thick around me that I nearly faded into a sort of catatonic state. A meeting with a former prof at UCLA wasn't meant to be anything more than an introduction to the aerospace scientific community.

No such luck.

I met and interviewed with Marianne Olds recent widow of Jim Olds who was struggling to keep their lab going at Cal Tech. We hit it off and I joined her team there. A year later I was back in Florida writing and defending my dissertation even though about 20% of the data had been lost somewhere between FSU and Covina CA.

Unbelievable.

I always kept in touch with past academic connections is the only rationale I can come up with how this turnaround took place.

Marriage saved. Good life followed. Never returned to those thoughts again.

I don't know if it was a turning inward. The whole period is a blur now. Selective amnesia? Perhaps.
 

DrZoidberg

Contributor
Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
10,155
Location
Copenhagen
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
It was true for me back in the day. I contend doing so is not necessary. But whenever I'm confronted with the thought I turn inward.

I didn't. I'm an extroverted person. I just stopped doing things. Doing regular things became exhausting and I just didn't have energy. But I felt like I was in a good mood. I just didn't do stuff. According to my psychiatrist, that is also a normal form of depression. I should also add that he also said that he didn't think I had any depressive tendencies. I was just traumatised, and the depression came as a result of the trauma. Which was pretty extreme in my case. So it didn't need years of therapy to figure out that cause and effect.

I wasn't suicidal and didn't have suicidal thoughts. I was pretty happy and cheerful about life. Just incredibly mentally tired all the time.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
12,148
My larger point is that certain circumstances may make it impossible to not think negatively. Being able to avoid turning inward may depend on your mental ability to let anxiety dissipate, as well as the severity of the depression. In some cases, physical, chronic depression warps the mind, in other cases life circumstances are so bad that it's near impossible to stay positive.

But don't forget that the feelings of solitude and isolation have a kind of survival value for many, a feature, not a bug. They force us to seek companions rather than being content with our dearth of life circumstances.

My life for about two years after we left FSU with dissertation data accumulated and writing underway is a circumstance right out of your book or horrors. Depression was so thick around me that I nearly faded into a sort of catatonic state. A meeting with a former prof at UCLA wasn't meant to be anything more than an introduction to the aerospace scientific community.

No such luck.

I met and interviewed with Marianne Olds recent widow of Jim Olds who was struggling to keep their lab going at Cal Tech. We hit it off and I joined her team there. A year later I was back in Florida writing and defending my dissertation even though about 20% of the data had been lost somewhere between FSU and Covina CA.

Unbelievable.

I always kept in touch with past academic connections is the only rationale I can come up with how this turnaround took place.

Marriage saved. Good life followed. Never returned to those thoughts again.

I don't know if it was a turning inward. The whole period is a blur now. Selective amnesia? Perhaps.

Any depression I've experienced falls into the chemical imbalance type, mainly two separate responses to extreme mania. I don't recommend this at all, particularly when you're a new grad, your girlfriend isn't interested in you anymore, and you have no idea what you're going to do with your life, so decide to be a teacher of all things.

To my credit I fought through it both times and largely did what I needed to do. In first instance I pulled up my bootstraps and finished my final year of university (luckily with some financial help from my parents). In second instance I managed to find work and make it through volunteer experience to get into teacher's college.

No serious depression since then, which was about 12 years ago. But that last episode I tell ya.

The closest thing I got since was when I was a 24 year old in a small town in Quebec trying to finish a 10 month stint of teaching, with no car, no friends, and drinking heavily on weekends. Why I didn't wait a week and go to Montreal instead, only a 24 year old could answer. I lasted until October until my introversion, drinking problem, and solitude could go no further, but when I quit it was relief, not depression. I still recall walking down a road in Thetford Mines after I'd quit and feeling a sense of my life being a great unknown, liberation. No plan, not even an inkling of a plan of how I was going to support myself in the future.

A year later I was back in school happily typing functions into software IDEs, a few feet away from my future wife, living on a futon in the room I'm sitting in as I type this.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
12,148
It was true for me back in the day. I contend doing so is not necessary. But whenever I'm confronted with the thought I turn inward.

I didn't. I'm an extroverted person. I just stopped doing things. Doing regular things became exhausting and I just didn't have energy. But I felt like I was in a good mood. I just didn't do stuff. According to my psychiatrist, that is also a normal form of depression. I should also add that he also said that he didn't think I had any depressive tendencies. I was just traumatised, and the depression came as a result of the trauma. Which was pretty extreme in my case. So it didn't need years of therapy to figure out that cause and effect.

I wasn't suicidal and didn't have suicidal thoughts. I was pretty happy and cheerful about life. Just incredibly mentally tired all the time.

These days I feel like I may be a functional depressive like this, in some respects. I have enough energy and motivation to do very well in day to day, critical tasks, but when it comes to pushing myself beyond boundaries to experience the world in any kind of joyful way, it's difficult.

I rarely have the motivation to see friends, travel, go to movies, or really do much of anything other than hang out with my wife and read. Maybe it's just because those are the only two things I actually like doing? Who knows.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
Being a good partner is important, most important from my experience. You've got relatively new thing in your life. No surprise it is the center or near center of what you are right now. The thing is whether she thinks your interest is is adequate and wanted. Really. That is the only thing you should be using as a compass. What you are working on will determine your life value.

There will come a time when back and leg rubs become your contact sport.
 

Torin

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 30, 2018
Messages
190
Location
USA
In my opinion:

Yes, people with depression naturally turn inward. They are searching their mind trying to figure out "what is wrong with me?"

However, this is unhealthy and the wrong approach. They should be turning outward and asking "what do I need to do to reach my goals?"

The first approach leads to endless rumination, which goes nowhere. The second approach leads to a plan of action based on facts.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
Using Trump as an example I beg to differ. Random firings based on what one hears is no solution to anything. A flower following the movement of the sun would do better.

I agree rumination is at the base of my criticisms of those who call looking inward instrospection.
 

TV and credit cards

Veteran Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2013
Messages
4,343
Location
muh-dahy-nuh
Basic Beliefs
Humanist
so thick around me
^
This is depression.

There are no goals. There are no interests. There are no desires. There is just a paralyzed existence. Depression is heavy and consuming. It's when you've gone past, given up on introspection. Turn inward? Inward is the depression.

It's swell when it goes away and you can just be down in the dumps again with the occasional spurt of ambition.
 
  • Like
Reactions: WAB

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
12,148
Being a good partner is important, most important from my experience. You've got relatively new thing in your life. No surprise it is the center or near center of what you are right now. The thing is whether she thinks your interest is is adequate and wanted. Really. That is the only thing you should be using as a compass. What you are working on will determine your life value.

There will come a time when back and leg rubs become your contact sport.
Yea that's a big focus. Honestly? Completely crazy about her, and now more so as mother of my child.

I'm not really one to look outward, I know what I have and am holding on tight. Including banging on a pot near her head about breast cancer check ups. That'll likely happen.

I don't know that I'm depressed as much as in a malaise. I crave novelty like no other and find it hard to get. Fatherhood might just do the trick. Lately also embracing anyone willing to give me their attention.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
I'm not really one to look outward, I know what I have and am holding on tight. Including banging on a pot near her head about breast cancer check ups. That'll likely happen.

Above is a point where looking inward can be counterproductive. Not a good idea to insert fear in others unwanted, especially when they are realistically concentrating elsewhere.

First law of devotion is to be devoted. Being so is definitely not being fearfully obsessive about well being of the one to which devotion is aimed. Loved one, when truly in crisis, will give clues.

For instance when bride began being fearful of going to a job she loved it was time to get her to share. Turns out all she needed was a person to shout at someone who was making things worse from a previous situation.

Donned my superman suit. Got on the horn and berated person as a professional with elegant credentials. Admonished him for sloppy and childish behavior as an uncaring administrator. Made sure she heard.

Amazing effect. Kind of like that of Mighty Mouse declaring "here I come to save the day".

He was chastised. She was supported. Both worked things out nicely. Just a little demonstration of support, caring, and sensitivity were all she needed.

Of course proper staging makes things work out.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
12,148
I'm not really one to look outward, I know what I have and am holding on tight. Including banging on a pot near her head about breast cancer check ups. That'll likely happen.

Above is a point where looking inward can be counterproductive. Not a good idea to insert fear in others unwanted, especially when they are realistically concentrating elsewhere.

First law of devotion is to be devoted. Being so is definitely not being fearfully obsessive about well being of the one to which devotion is aimed. Loved one, when truly in crisis, will give clues.

For instance when bride began being fearful of going to a job she loved it was time to get her to share. Turns out all she needed was a person to shout at someone who was making things worse from a previous situation.

Donned my superman suit. Got on the horn and berated person as a professional with elegant credentials. Admonished him for sloppy and childish behavior as an uncaring administrator. Made sure she heard.

Amazing effect. Kind of like that of Mighty Mouse declaring "here I come to save the day".

He was chastised. She was supported. Both worked things out nicely. Just a little demonstration of support, caring, and sensitivity were all she needed.

Of course proper staging makes things work out.

Yea there was a bit of humor in there. We're pretty good with each other, with most things, but with cancer I've given her a few gentle reminders and prodding to take it seriously as the years roll.
 

DrZoidberg

Contributor
Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
10,155
Location
Copenhagen
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
It was true for me back in the day. I contend doing so is not necessary. But whenever I'm confronted with the thought I turn inward.

I didn't. I'm an extroverted person. I just stopped doing things. Doing regular things became exhausting and I just didn't have energy. But I felt like I was in a good mood. I just didn't do stuff. According to my psychiatrist, that is also a normal form of depression. I should also add that he also said that he didn't think I had any depressive tendencies. I was just traumatised, and the depression came as a result of the trauma. Which was pretty extreme in my case. So it didn't need years of therapy to figure out that cause and effect.

I wasn't suicidal and didn't have suicidal thoughts. I was pretty happy and cheerful about life. Just incredibly mentally tired all the time.

These days I feel like I may be a functional depressive like this, in some respects. I have enough energy and motivation to do very well in day to day, critical tasks, but when it comes to pushing myself beyond boundaries to experience the world in any kind of joyful way, it's difficult.

I rarely have the motivation to see friends, travel, go to movies, or really do much of anything other than hang out with my wife and read. Maybe it's just because those are the only two things I actually like doing? Who knows.

Doing things that are familiar we do, very much, on autopilot. It's less taxing for the brain. The difference is what Daniel Khanneman calls "Thinking fast. Thinking slow". The fast system uses less of the brain. When we're put in a cat scan the slow system uses more of the brain. It's exhausting. But is whaty you use when learning new things.
 

Treedbear

Veteran Member
Joined
May 30, 2016
Messages
2,567
Location
out on a limb
Basic Beliefs
secular, humanist, agnostic on theism/atheism
It was true for me back in the day. I contend doing so is not necessary. But whenever I'm confronted with the thought I turn inward.

I think depression is due to being frustrated in fulfilling one's perceived purpose. Transcending then. Connecting the then of the past to a then of the future. If one lacks this perceived continuity it becomes difficult to see one's path forward. The result is immobility and lack of interaction with others. Of course life's changes can result in a lack of purpose (such as loosing a partner or going into retirement) without resulting in depression. Searching for purpose isn't depressing. Having found a purpose and then not finding a way to reify and fulfill it is.
 

Shobha

New member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
40
Location
India
Basic Beliefs
Atheist, Liberal
Depression is a huge spectrum, ranging from feeling upset, hurt, or just lonely, right upto chronic and clinical depression. Obviously, if you are towards the right end of the spectrum, then it is far more serious.
Humans are social creatures, by nature. We may end up doing a lot of things online and alone, but the fact remains that we need social contact, and human interaction fairly regularly.
Yes, we don't want to be constantly bombarded by personal attention. But human interaction, especially if it is with people we like, and respect, very much can, and does, cheer us up.

Introspection, IMO, is a different subject altogether. We can do it when we are happy, when we are depressed, or when we are somewhere in between.

What we call "introspection", when we are depressed, IMO, is more like "wallowing in our misery". It is usually not productive. I would personally prefer talking it out.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
6,437
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
Depression is a huge spectrum, ranging from feeling upset, hurt, or just lonely, right upto chronic and clinical depression. Obviously, if you are towards the right end of the spectrum, then it is far more serious.
Humans are social creatures, by nature. We may end up doing a lot of things online and alone, but the fact remains that we need social contact, and human interaction fairly regularly.
Yes, we don't want to be constantly bombarded by personal attention. But human interaction, especially if it is with people we like, and respect, very much can, and does, cheer us up.

Introspection, IMO, is a different subject altogether. We can do it when we are happy, when we are depressed, or when we are somewhere in between.

What we call "introspection", when we are depressed, IMO, is more like "wallowing in our misery". It is usually not productive. I would personally prefer talking it out.

You are right! I have been trying to decide which type of depression is being discussed in this thread, the mlld type that most of us feel now and then, the short term situational depression that is often helped by medication and/or time, or the severe type, usually coded as Major Depression that some people suffer from for most of their lives.

For example, depression and bipolar disorder run in my family I had an uncle who suffered from Major Depression for as long as I knew him. Sometimes he was with drawn. Other times he was hospitalized for his depression, and given whatever treatments and medication were available back in those days. Once he wrote a book about the history of our family. The last time I saw him was at a wedding. He appeared to be trying to be upbeat. But, sometime later, he committed suicide.

I had a brief bout of postpartum depression when my son was born nearly 50 years ago. But, I think it was more a situational depression as my ex was drafted when our baby was 2 weeks old. It didn't last long and we ended up living in Texas during his time in the army.

We all have some bad days when we feel down. I can't say that I'm introspective when. feel down. I just try to find ways to escape, like listening to music or watching some good comedy etc.

I don't think we can generalize about depression. It comes in many different shades and people respond in different ways. While medication is sometimes useful, that's not always the case. I believe that my late father was helped for awhile after he received ECT. He didn't think so, but I could tell by his attitude and increased energy, that it appeared to help.

A person can lose a spouse and never get over it, or they can grief for awhile, and then move on. We are all victims of genetics and the circumstances in our lives. When it comes to depression, some people never find a cure, while others do. But, unless you're an extreme introvert who hates being around people, sharing your life with others sometimes helps.


If one experiences mild to moderate chronic depression, being around others usually helps, as long as your don't burden others with your problems too much. When someone constantly complains about everything that brings them down, they can become too difficult to keep supporting emotionally.
 

rousseau

Contributor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
12,148
Ultimately it's a neurological problem, and a continuum. Mild and Major depression are very similar chemically, but they differ in severity and cause. For some people it's a problem with brain structure and function - major depression - for others it can be a result of environmental influences - poverty, winter, drugs, lack of positive social interaction, stress. The ipso facto cause is hormonal, the difference is what's producing the imbalance, and how severe it is.

One of my good friends who is a psychiatrist tells me this is what makes depression, specifically, very difficult to treat. All the doctor really knows is that there is a hormonal imbalance, but it's very difficult to isolate the cause, or maybe multiple causes. Whereas with something like Bipolar there is usually a pretty clear cause / effect / treatment.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
Prickly subject being broached.

...and why do I love my psychiatrist friends so much? They don't wrap themselves around such as 'hormonal imbalance'. Think about for just a short second. Our 'natures' aren't general, nor are they unique. Our makes ups are neither either. So why should our biochemistry be general?

(Dramatic pause to let effect of obvious sink in)

Hull proved we weren't determined by bollae over 70 years ago, else there would be college students today observing rats in lifted cages. Students would be using Jungian archetypes as something meaningful rather than what they are, a shorthand for a fanciful literary construct. Jung? Philosophy, bad philosophy, better literary mechanism. Thank the greeks.

We do have things that can be systematized medically they just aren't mood constructions. My neurons won't fire as well if I don't have adequate levels of potassium. So doctors giving me water pills to remove build up of liquids around my heart and lungs to relieve lethargy and fatigue symptoms of congestive heart failure monitor it.

I'm pretty sure we don't have a complete catalog of effects of improper liver functions either. I'm also pretty sure there aren't moods treated with lithium or it's stylish equivalent for that organ system. We shouldn't be doing such for the nervous system either.

Just sayin'

A while back I broached the subject of learning and found it is most likely inherent in nervous function that has ascending and descending aspects rather than a locus or engram.

I say rather than prescribe modern witchcraft and leading edge discoveries we barely understand let's just relax and let humans be humans with all their diversity. Would you like your grandchildren blaming you for the equivalent of putting women away for 'hysteria' for just being women who have money?

We are making progress. However we aren't personality or behavioral surgeons yet, nor will we be for the next century or so at least.
 

Shobha

New member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
40
Location
India
Basic Beliefs
Atheist, Liberal
The human spirit is tremendously resilient. Happiness research has shown that even after the worst personal tragedies or losses, people get back to their normal levels of happiness after a few months. But remember, we evolved in hunter gatherer tribes, a huge extended family. We were never alone. So it was much harder to get into deeper depression, do something silly like commit suicide etc. But now there are a lot more people who are alone, without even a nuclear family, let alone extended family, and friends.
Also, nutrition levels are much worse. Lot more refined carbs, lot less healthy fats and protein, plus lots more toxins. All of that contributes, IMO to more depression and its repercussions.
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
6,437
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
Ultimately it's a neurological problem, and a continuum. Mild and Major depression are very similar chemically, but they differ in severity and cause. For some people it's a problem with brain structure and function - major depression - for others it can be a result of environmental influences - poverty, winter, drugs, lack of positive social interaction, stress. The ipso facto cause is hormonal, the difference is what's producing the imbalance, and how severe it is.

One of my good friends who is a psychiatrist tells me this is what makes depression, specifically, very difficult to treat. All the doctor really knows is that there is a hormonal imbalance, but it's very difficult to isolate the cause, or maybe multiple causes. Whereas with something like Bipolar there is usually a pretty clear cause / effect / treatment.

Isn't that almost exactly what I said in my last post? :D. Of course, I used different wording but that's basically what I meant, other than your remark about bipolar disorder, which can also be extremely difficult to treat, depending on the severity and whether or not it includes other aspects of mental illness along with the mood swings. I had two former patients that had severe types of bipolar disorder. One had hallucination, delusions of grandeur as well as mood swings. The other one suffered from paranoias to some extent. She was always convinced that one of the female workers was having an affair with her husband, for example.

I sometimes think that it would be better if we didn't label mental illnesses like we currently do, as the individuals who suffer from these brain disorders have so many different symptoms. Maybe all mental illnesses should just be referred to as brain disorders, and then an attempt could be made to treat the symptoms that each individual exhibits. All I know is that we have never been successful in finding adequate treatment for these diseases. There is a good book called, "Nobody Cares About Crazy People" that gives the sad history of how society and the medical profession have failed the victims of these diseases. Considering how many now live on the streets, it doesn't seem as if we've made nearly as much progress as we might think we have in helping the mentally ill. But, I digress. Sorry.

And, imo, there are a lot of terrible psychiatrists out there, including the one that my sister has used for almost 40 years. I've seen how they've treated or sometimes mistreated my former patients. I've seen them be angry, judgmental or simply incompetent. And, despite years of research and FDA approval for new anti depressants, chronic depression is a very difficult condition to treat. Hopefully, now that we have brain scans and MRI's, we will learn more about how this condition impacts the brain and maybe find a more effective way to treat it. Maybe..........
 

Tharmas

Veteran Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2001
Messages
1,487
Location
Texas
Basic Beliefs
Pantheist
...I sometimes think that it would be better if we didn't label mental illnesses like we currently do, as the individuals who suffer from these brain disorders have so many different symptoms. Maybe all mental illnesses should just be referred to as brain disorders, and then an attempt could be made to treat the symptoms that each individual exhibits...

I suffered a bipolar breakdown about fifteen years ago, reacting to some major personal catastrophes all occurring in my life at the same time. My psychiatrist treated me with some very effective drugs that eliminated the excessive paranoia and the excessive risk-taking mania, without any unfortunate side effects (one of the drugs makes me sleep a lot, but that's an OK trade-off as far as I'm concerned). My psychiatrist said, when she first prescribed these drugs and I expressed fear of being turned into a zombie: "Let's be clear. I'm treating your brain, not your mind." I noted the apparent dualism, but I knew what she meant. Fix the brain and the mind comes along with it. I still see her bi-monthly so she can assess my condition before renewing my prescriptions, and I find the talk therapy part of it to be fine. No complaints.
 

ReneSummers

New member
Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
1
Location
Maryland
Basic Beliefs
Secular humanism
I am new here and this will be my first posting.
I think that being depressed IS being inward and difficult to get out of it. I do have fond memories of my past, but crappy ones overtake the good ones. I am over 60 now and have been depressed for I dunno how long. But eventually my therapist described my brain as Dysthymia with major depressive episodes. It is hard to strain the energy out of the cesspool, but for now I think just being in the sunshine will help if I could only wake up in the mornings.
I do have one important thing to pass onto our friends, I recently started on my BiPap machine and there is an improvement in my energy reserves. The sleep specialist diagnose me me sever sleep apnea and suffered it since a toddler. It will take several month of stable use to feel more energy. Anyway, perhaps try seeing a sleep specialist for a sleep test and see what they can do for you.
 

Treedbear

Veteran Member
Joined
May 30, 2016
Messages
2,567
Location
out on a limb
Basic Beliefs
secular, humanist, agnostic on theism/atheism
I am new here and this will be my first posting.
I think that being depressed IS being inward and difficult to get out of it. I do have fond memories of my past, but crappy ones overtake the good ones. I am over 60 now and have been depressed for I dunno how long. But eventually my therapist described my brain as Dysthymia with major depressive episodes. It is hard to strain the energy out of the cesspool, but for now I think just being in the sunshine will help if I could only wake up in the mornings.
I do have one important thing to pass onto our friends, I recently started on my BiPap machine and there is an improvement in my energy reserves. The sleep specialist diagnose me me sever sleep apnea and suffered it since a toddler. It will take several month of stable use to feel more energy. Anyway, perhaps try seeing a sleep specialist for a sleep test and see what they can do for you.

Welcome Rene. Surprised I'm the first one to greet you as there are usually tons of friendly types here. Lately it seems the world is under some surrealistic depression, not entirely of the economic variety. It's been difficult getting any discussions going lately let alone sustaining them. I've been trying to figure it out regarding my own behavior. Just don't take our underwhelming response personally. As for myself I've always been rather introverted and would rather adopt an objective perspective than rely too much on subjective involvements. That said I find this forum and what's normally a very interactive group very useful to me as a way to gain perspective on disappointments in how my own life has unfolded. I think it's necessary for each of us to develop our own philosophy on life and our place in it and only through such knowledge that comes through our ability to reason and explore our feelings can we find peace. Of course there can be medical aspects such as sleep apnea or chemical imbalances that can have huge effects. I imagine the two approaches must work together and that at the fundamental level they involve the same mechanisms and processes in the brain. Anyway, I wanted to say hello and encourage you to stick around.
 

Shobha

New member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
40
Location
India
Basic Beliefs
Atheist, Liberal
Welcome. I am new here as well ... was an active member of IIDB ages ago, need to get used to the new forum :)
I suffer from frequent depression and anxiety too, although so far they have not been debilitating. I am 48.
My mom, who died recently, had several issues with anxiety and depression as well, and I think I get some of it from there.
Good to here that you are having better energy levels now. One step at a time, right?
 

southernhybrid

Contributor
Joined
Aug 13, 2001
Messages
6,437
Location
Georgia, US
Basic Beliefs
atheist
I am new here and this will be my first posting.
I think that being depressed IS being inward and difficult to get out of it. I do have fond memories of my past, but crappy ones overtake the good ones. I am over 60 now and have been depressed for I dunno how long. But eventually my therapist described my brain as Dysthymia with major depressive episodes. It is hard to strain the energy out of the cesspool, but for now I think just being in the sunshine will help if I could only wake up in the mornings.
I do have one important thing to pass onto our friends, I recently started on my BiPap machine and there is an improvement in my energy reserves. The sleep specialist diagnose me me sever sleep apnea and suffered it since a toddler. It will take several month of stable use to feel more energy. Anyway, perhaps try seeing a sleep specialist for a sleep test and see what they can do for you.

Welcome! Thanks for sharing your own personal problems. I've never heard anyone say that their sleep apnea caused depression, so you've taught me something new. I hope you will stay with us and add some more interesting things to the discussions. We certainly need new members and more activity, as things have slowed down quite a bit recently, so look around and find a comfortable place.
 

GenesisNemesis

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2006
Messages
3,793
Location
California
Basic Beliefs
Super evil transhumanist communist

GenesisNemesis

Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2006
Messages
3,793
Location
California
Basic Beliefs
Super evil transhumanist communist
Also it's hilarious that you don't link to a scientific study on this, but instead it's just a Twitter post.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,513
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
Just trying to move the discussion forward .....

Meanwhile .... in New Zealand research goes on. https://www.researchgate.net/profil...It-takes-trust-to-talk-about-these-issues.pdf

Abstract ....... . A thematic analysis identified a range of priorities participants had for engaging in support online. These included the importance of establishing emotional safety; picking up subtle cues for distress; allowing the open expression of emotion; showing care; being tactful and sensitive to needs of othersand developing on-going relationships. Those designing online interventions for youth in distress can learn from the way that young people already give and receive support online. Recognising the importance that young people give to trusting relationships as a prerequisite for engagement with online support has important implications for the development of interventions which can connect with young people.

OK it's not world wide, only 21 persons and pretty british actually.

Still its better than gossip over twitter.

Maybe we should be talking about trust when we talk about discussing depression with others...... maybe trust becomes a reason why we appear to turn inward when we sense we have contact and confidence problems ...

just sayin'
 
Top Bottom