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Would you rather sit and think or get an electrical shock?

Would you rather sit and think or get an electrical shock?

  • Sit and do nothing for 15 minutes

    Votes: 17 85.0%
  • Receive a mild electrical shock

    Votes: 3 15.0%

  • Total voters
    20

RavenSky

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Would you rather:

  • Be alone and do nothing for 15 minutes, or
  • Be administered a mild electric shock

A U.S. study published on Thursday showed that most volunteers who were asked to spend no more than 15 minutes alone in a room doing nothing but sitting and thinking found the task onerous.

In fact, some of the volunteers, men in particular, in one of the 11 experiments led by University of Virginia researchers preferred to administer mild electrical shocks to themselves rather than sit and do nothing.

“Many people find it difficult to use their own minds to entertain themselves, at least when asked to do it on the spot,” said University of Virginia psychology professor Timothy Wilson, who led the study appearing in the journal Science. “In this modern age, with all the gadgets we have, people seem to fill up every moment with some external activity.”

http://richarddawkins.net/2014/07/would-you-rather-sit-and-think-or-get-shocked-youd-be-surprised/

The researchers took their studies further. Because most people prefer having something to do rather than just thinking, they then asked, "Would they rather do an unpleasant activity than no activity at all?"

The results show that many would. Participants were given the same circumstances as most of the previous studies, with the added option of also administering a mild electric shock to themselves by pressing a button.

Twelve of 18 men in the study gave themselves at least one electric shock during the study's 15-minute "thinking" period. By comparison, six of 24 females shocked themselves. All of these participants had received a sample of the shock and reported that they would pay to avoid being shocked again.

"What is striking," the investigators write, "is that simply being alone with their own thoughts for 15 minutes was apparently so aversive that it drove many participants to self-administer an electric shock that they had earlier said they would pay to avoid."
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-07/uov-dsi063014.php
 

Under the Rose

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Obviously, we are a species that is not very good at entertaining ourselves and our education systems have not taught us the potentials of the human mind. The majority of humans are 'herd animals' and when isolated from others and external stimulation, we perceive the situation as irregular, possibly even alarming and for that reason it becomes more difficult to disengage our default 'fight or flight' response.
 

Bronzeage

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There's no reason I can't do both.

I can't count how many mild(and worse) electric shocks I have received. I find them conducive to thought, mostly along the lines of, "I think I shouldn't do that again."

Fifteen minutes alone to do nothing and think is a luxurious indulgence. I wish I had that at least once a day and the ability to administer a mild shock to anyone who interrupted me.
 

Under the Rose

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There's no reason I can't do both.

I can't count how many mild(and worse) electric shocks I have received. I find them conducive to thought, mostly along the lines of, "I think I shouldn't do that again."

Fifteen minutes alone to do nothing and think is a luxurious indulgence. I wish I had that at least once a day and the ability to administer a mild shock to anyone who interrupted me.

I have accidentally shocked myself once or twice, hand slipping while plugging in a cord etc. so now I prefer to be wearing gloves when plugging in the car etc. To contemplate intentionally giving myself a shock instead of enjoying a few blessed minutes of stillness and silence is incomprehensible to me. Makes me wonder if people are so over-stimulated that they actually suffer from 'withdrawals' without the constant backdrop of activity and electronic noise.
 

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10377349_266630820189811_8881624621945178484_n.jpg
 

Keith&Co.

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What the hell?
I'd pay for 15 minutes of the idiots in the next cube just being QUIET, much less solitude....

I swear, a twenty minute discussion about who was Goose's wife in Top Gun, while refusing to look it up until they were satisfied that they knew whether it was Charlize Theron or Geena Davis...
Wait, can i have both? I get solitude and shock THEM?
 

Bronzeage

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There's no reason I can't do both.

I can't count how many mild(and worse) electric shocks I have received. I find them conducive to thought, mostly along the lines of, "I think I shouldn't do that again."

Fifteen minutes alone to do nothing and think is a luxurious indulgence. I wish I had that at least once a day and the ability to administer a mild shock to anyone who interrupted me.

I have accidentally shocked myself once or twice, hand slipping while plugging in a cord etc. so now I prefer to be wearing gloves when plugging in the car etc. To contemplate intentionally giving myself a shock instead of enjoying a few blessed minutes of stillness and silence is incomprehensible to me. Makes me wonder if people are so over-stimulated that they actually suffer from 'withdrawals' without the constant backdrop of activity and electronic noise.

I think you are right. I can't remember the last time I saw someone sitting alone in a bar, nursing a drink, and they did not have their phone in their hand.
 

bilby

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There's no reason I can't do both.

I can't count how many mild(and worse) electric shocks I have received. I find them conducive to thought, mostly along the lines of, "I think I shouldn't do that again."

Fifteen minutes alone to do nothing and think is a luxurious indulgence. I wish I had that at least once a day and the ability to administer a mild shock to anyone who interrupted me.

I have accidentally shocked myself once or twice, hand slipping while plugging in a cord etc. so now I prefer to be wearing gloves when plugging in the car etc. To contemplate intentionally giving myself a shock instead of enjoying a few blessed minutes of stillness and silence is incomprehensible to me. Makes me wonder if people are so over-stimulated that they actually suffer from 'withdrawals' without the constant backdrop of activity and electronic noise.

If you need to wear gloves to avoid a shock when plugging something in, you should call an electrician. The only shocks you should ever get are static shocks; if you get a shock from electrical equipment, then it is in dangerously poor repair. No matter how you slip, or misplace your hands, a properly designed plug and socket should have no exposed live parts accessible to give you a shock at any time; the pins shouldn't be live until the gap between plug and wall is too small to admit even a child's little finger.
 

Bronzeage

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I have accidentally shocked myself once or twice, hand slipping while plugging in a cord etc. so now I prefer to be wearing gloves when plugging in the car etc. To contemplate intentionally giving myself a shock instead of enjoying a few blessed minutes of stillness and silence is incomprehensible to me. Makes me wonder if people are so over-stimulated that they actually suffer from 'withdrawals' without the constant backdrop of activity and electronic noise.

If you need to wear gloves to avoid a shock when plugging something in, you should call an electrician. The only shocks you should ever get are static shocks; if you get a shock from electrical equipment, then it is in dangerously poor repair. No matter how you slip, or misplace your hands, a properly designed plug and socket should have no exposed live parts accessible to give you a shock at any time; the pins shouldn't be live until the gap between plug and wall is too small to admit even a child's little finger.

In 1975, all auto manufacturers switched over to electronic ignition. This raised secondary voltage from around 30k volts to 75k or higher. I could definitely tell the difference. The latest models can produce 125k volts. They didn't call it high energy ignition for nothing.

When working with regular household or commercial electrical systems, especially old work, sometimes things happen.
 

bilby

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If you need to wear gloves to avoid a shock when plugging something in, you should call an electrician. The only shocks you should ever get are static shocks; if you get a shock from electrical equipment, then it is in dangerously poor repair. No matter how you slip, or misplace your hands, a properly designed plug and socket should have no exposed live parts accessible to give you a shock at any time; the pins shouldn't be live until the gap between plug and wall is too small to admit even a child's little finger.

In 1975, all auto manufacturers switched over to electronic ignition. This raised secondary voltage from around 30k volts to 75k or higher. I could definitely tell the difference. The latest models can produce 125k volts. They didn't call it high energy ignition for nothing.

When working with regular household or commercial electrical systems, especially old work, sometimes things happen.

I can see how you might get shocks from the high-voltage, low current portions of a vehicle's ignition system; but I get the impression UtR is referring to plugging something into the mains - a block-heater or battery charger for example - rather than changing spark-plugs.
 

Bronzeage

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In 1975, all auto manufacturers switched over to electronic ignition. This raised secondary voltage from around 30k volts to 75k or higher. I could definitely tell the difference. The latest models can produce 125k volts. They didn't call it high energy ignition for nothing.

When working with regular household or commercial electrical systems, especially old work, sometimes things happen.



I can see how you might get shocks from the high-voltage, low current portions of a vehicle's ignition system; but I get the impression UtR is referring to plugging something into the mains - a block-heater or battery charger for example - rather than changing spark-plugs.

That is bad and should not happen if everything is done right. These days, some much of appliance frames and cases are plastic, getting shocked is very rare.

The shock from an ignition system happens not while changing the plugs, but when the engine is running. Back when I was known as "the tune up mechanic," I was the only guy who had to work on the car while the motor was running.
 

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Seeing as how I actually find mild electric shocks quite pleasant (I'm weird), I would totally throw the results in disarray.

I remember being at an event in Germany where these people had created a pong machine with some added tweaks: if you missed, you got one of three punishments depending on the various bonuses that had been played: 1) your hand got shocked, 2) you got really hot air blowed at your hand (hot enough to cause blisters after repeated playing), or 3) you got a small rubber whip smashed repeatedly against your hand (hard enough to cause bleeding after repeated playing). If any of these punishments resulted in you removing your hand from two contact points on the machine, you lost the game and your opponent won. One particularly common tactic people used was to try and get the bonus to the shock punishment, and then multiplying the time it would shock their opponent. This didn't work on me because I got somewhat addicted to the shocks.

In any case, the large number of people who stuck with the various forms of pain just so they wouldn't lose the game was interesting from a psychological standpoint.
 

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What the hell?
I'd pay for 15 minutes of the idiots in the next cube just being QUIET, much less solitude....

I swear, a twenty minute discussion about who was Goose's wife in Top Gun, while refusing to look it up until they were satisfied that they knew whether it was Charlize Theron or Geena Davis...

Pfft. Easy. It was Kelly McGillis.



Okay, I'm kidding. It was Susan Sarandon.


Not really. Meg Ryan.


 

James Brown

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Grown-ups hate time-out as much as kids do.

Good point. At what point are people ever trained to sit quietly? I can't even pump gas for three minutes without being bedazzled with muzak and video screens broadcasting news snippets and sales on beef jerky.
 

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I just got done getting electric shocks. They are highly overrated.

Sit me under a tree on a warm summer's day and I can stay there well over fifteen minutes. Whether any mental productivity is occurring is another matter.


I have accidentally shocked myself once or twice, hand slipping while plugging in a cord etc. so now I prefer to be wearing gloves when plugging in the car etc. To contemplate intentionally giving myself a shock instead of enjoying a few blessed minutes of stillness and silence is incomprehensible to me. Makes me wonder if people are so over-stimulated that they actually suffer from 'withdrawals' without the constant backdrop of activity and electronic noise.
I know down in the lower 48, three wire electrical wasn't code until the late 60's I believe. Everything before that was two wire (no safety ground) and you had to rely on the return. If this just happens on your one outlet where you plug the car in, perhaps it's a corroded connection on the outlet, especially if this outlet is more exposed to the elements. Also, there shouldn't but may be outlets downstream of this one on the same circuit that may be affected.
The older the home and the more owners it's had, the worse the electrical is likely to be. People do some jacked up stuff. They get electricity flowing to where they want it and think it's mission accomplished.

Safety derailment.
 

Under the Rose

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It has been a very long time since I received a direct electrical shock and as I recall, I was unplugging a vacuum cleaner or some such and my sweaty hands made contact with the prongs just as they were coming free. Plugging the cars in at work, one has to always watch for wind driven snow or moisture in the wall plug ins if the covers are not returned to place. Any trace of moisture in the female receptacle will result in crackling and possibly throwing a breaker. Our store is indeed a very old building and will be getting an upgrade very shortly.

I am just very apprehensive of electricity and when working around it outdoors, I use gloves as a precaution. We have GFI circuits for most of the outside plug-ins and the house was wired by a certified electrician. This is a very dry climate and static electricity shocks are very frequent during the winter. Hubby and I make a point of grounding ourselves before kissing, lol.

http://goaskalice.columbia.edu/hot-and-bothered-static-electric-shocks
 

Bronzeage

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It has been a very long time since I received a direct electrical shock and as I recall, I was unplugging a vacuum cleaner or some such and my sweaty hands made contact with the prongs just as they were coming free. Plugging the cars in at work, one has to always watch for wind driven snow or moisture in the wall plug ins if the covers are not returned to place. Any trace of moisture in the female receptacle will result in crackling and possibly throwing a breaker. Our store is indeed a very old building and will be getting an upgrade very shortly.

I am just very apprehensive of electricity and when working around it outdoors, I use gloves as a precaution. We have GFI circuits for most of the outside plug-ins and the house was wired by a certified electrician. This is a very dry climate and static electricity shocks are very frequent during the winter. Hubby and I make a point of grounding ourselves before kissing, lol.

http://goaskalice.columbia.edu/hot-and-bothered-static-electric-shocks

It took about 8 years, but I finally peeled away the last layer of non-code jackleg electrical work in my store. Some of the stuff was scary. My building was once a post office, so the 70 year old stuff is very high quality, but under capacity for modern use. The building now has 3 separate AC units. I had to add all the power circuits for the Secret Underground Laboratory. Fortunately there was an unused 50 amp circuit leftover from an old heater blower.

One of the benefits of being in an older building and knowing the electrical code is, as long as I do it right, I can always say it was like that when we moved in.
 

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I dunno, in retrospect this seems obvious.

Would you rather sit alone in a cube with nothing to do... or play with an electric shock machine? I think it's clear that, if left unsupervised with such a machine, a fair few people would shock themselves simply because it's a novel experience and a novel gadget. So all we're measuring is whether people choose to do dangerous things when bored.
 

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The study would be far more interesting if they measured other variables that predicted the willingness to get the shock, such as time per day using a smart phone or ipad, etc..
It is certainly an interesting question of what the long term effects are of people having a constant distraction (mostly filled with inane and mindless info) at their fingertips and/or constantly in their ears. People definitely spend much less time now "alone with their thoughts" than they did up until 10-15 years ago. In addition, when something in their environment requires them to think, so many don't bother and just "look it up" before making any real effort to retrieve the info from memory or reason it for themselves.
Given the evidence that thinking about and using what your already know is vital for cognitive development, this has to have a major impact not only on people's need to have a constant stream of inanity spilled into their senses but many aspects of intellectual and emotional development. OTOH, the effects could go either way depending on various individual differences. 20 years ago, when people were on the bus or waiting in line somewhere they didn't all deeply reflect. For those that are inclined to internally reflect, having an external source of constant distracting stimuli might be a negative to their development, but for people that would otherwise just stare into space and eat their boogers, maybe that stream of stimuli (no matter how vacuous) is an improvement over the absence of mental activity that otherwise would be occurring.
 

Malintent

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I have accidentally shocked myself once or twice, hand slipping while plugging in a cord etc. so now I prefer to be wearing gloves when plugging in the car etc. To contemplate intentionally giving myself a shock instead of enjoying a few blessed minutes of stillness and silence is incomprehensible to me. Makes me wonder if people are so over-stimulated that they actually suffer from 'withdrawals' without the constant backdrop of activity and electronic noise.

If you need to wear gloves to avoid a shock when plugging something in, you should call an electrician. The only shocks you should ever get are static shocks; if you get a shock from electrical equipment, then it is in dangerously poor repair. No matter how you slip, or misplace your hands, a properly designed plug and socket should have no exposed live parts accessible to give you a shock at any time; the pins shouldn't be live until the gap between plug and wall is too small to admit even a child's little finger.

Not true at all... the prongs on any plug are live just a few mm in.. not a few mm out. This is why it has recently become good practice (but not code) to mount 3 pronged outlets "upside down". That is, with the center ground pin "up" (upside down face). This is to prevent a short if the plug is partially inserted and an object slides down the wall at hits the prongs... it would only hit either the common or hot , as well as the ground... but not both hot and common.
 

bilby

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If you need to wear gloves to avoid a shock when plugging something in, you should call an electrician. The only shocks you should ever get are static shocks; if you get a shock from electrical equipment, then it is in dangerously poor repair. No matter how you slip, or misplace your hands, a properly designed plug and socket should have no exposed live parts accessible to give you a shock at any time; the pins shouldn't be live until the gap between plug and wall is too small to admit even a child's little finger.

Not true at all... the prongs on any plug are live just a few mm in.. not a few mm out. This is why it has recently become good practice (but not code) to mount 3 pronged outlets "upside down". That is, with the center ground pin "up" (upside down face). This is to prevent a short if the plug is partially inserted and an object slides down the wall at hits the prongs... it would only hit either the common or hot , as well as the ground... but not both hot and common.

That's not upside down; that's the right way up.

Americans are really strange. One of the strangest things about them is that they think they are the standard by which normality is measured. What you say may be true for any US plug, but it isn't true in the developed world.

From Wiki:
Pin insulation

Initially, BS 1363 did not require the line and neutral pins to have insulating sleeves. Plugs made to the recent revisions of the standard have insulated sleeves to prevent finger contact with pins, and also to stop metal objects (for example, fallen window blind slats) from becoming live if lodged between the wall and a partly pulled out plug. The length of the sleeves prevents any live contacts from being exposed while the plug is being inserted or removed. An early method of sleeving the pins involving spring loaded sleeves is described in the 1967 British Patent GB1067870. The method actually adopted is described in the 1972 British Patent GB1292991. Plugs with such pins were available in the 1970s, a Southern Electricity/RoSPA safety pamphlet from 1978 encourages their use. Sleeved pins became required by the standard in 1984.

It has been commonplace in the UK since the 1960s, and mandatory for the last thirty years, to design plugs in this way.
 

Emily Lake

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Regarding the OP... I am pretty sure I could sit quietly without trouble. The problem would arise on the observers end. I have a very active imagination, you see... and left to my own devices, without proper distraction, I tend to start imagining scenarios and conversations. That in itself is not an unusual thing for humans to do. I am also very expressive though. So I end up making gestures and facial expressions along with the imagined conversation :(

I might end up shocking myself just to save the potential embarrassment of someone testing me for a mental illness!
 

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Not true at all... the prongs on any plug are live just a few mm in.. not a few mm out. This is why it has recently become good practice (but not code) to mount 3 pronged outlets "upside down". That is, with the center ground pin "up" (upside down face). This is to prevent a short if the plug is partially inserted and an object slides down the wall at hits the prongs... it would only hit either the common or hot , as well as the ground... but not both hot and common.
I've noticed this practice with 30A dryer outlets which is odd because the molded plug/cord has to loop up over and down. Strange for a dryer outlet as they are generally up at waist height and flipping them puts the ground on bottom if I recall. I don't know why anyone would flip them but I've seen this a few times and on homes varying in age. I had never considered the "falling object" scenario. I had noticed this with newer 20A outlets that accept dedicated 20A plugs, their being flipped ground up. I had thought it was an additional practice to differentiate them from 15A outlets. Consider many power tools run right up to 15A. Probably be best to use a 20A if available.
I always look to see if something is code or practice. If it's practice, I look to see if there is a valid safety concern or if it looks like a money maker. For example pushing costly GFCI breakers over a GFCI outlet as the lead. I wonder about some wiring practices like having one circuit hop around to different rooms. I read in a handbook that 12AWG is preferred over 14 for lighting. With lighting going more and more low wattage, I wonder why.

Shocking. I'll have to sit and ponder this.
 

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Not true at all... the prongs on any plug are live just a few mm in.. not a few mm out. This is why it has recently become good practice (but not code) to mount 3 pronged outlets "upside down". That is, with the center ground pin "up" (upside down face). This is to prevent a short if the plug is partially inserted and an object slides down the wall at hits the prongs... it would only hit either the common or hot , as well as the ground... but not both hot and common.
I lost a good metal tape measure, and nearly lost an unobservant SO to this scenario.

The OP. I can happily sit waiting for things, thinking my own thoughts, and have experienced enough 240v and 50v shocks that I am not keen to volunteer for more. But I would share Emily Lake's problem that I might get too involved in what I was thinking and get carted off to the rubber room.
 

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Sit and think versus electrical shock? Sit and think.

Stand and think versus electrical shock? Electrical shock.

No thinking on my feet for me :D
 

Malintent

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Not true at all... the prongs on any plug are live just a few mm in.. not a few mm out. This is why it has recently become good practice (but not code) to mount 3 pronged outlets "upside down". That is, with the center ground pin "up" (upside down face). This is to prevent a short if the plug is partially inserted and an object slides down the wall at hits the prongs... it would only hit either the common or hot , as well as the ground... but not both hot and common.

That's not upside down; that's the right way up.

Americans are really strange. One of the strangest things about them is that they think they are the standard by which normality is measured. What you say may be true for any US plug, but it isn't true in the developed world.

From Wiki:
Pin insulation

Initially, BS 1363 did not require the line and neutral pins to have insulating sleeves. Plugs made to the recent revisions of the standard have insulated sleeves to prevent finger contact with pins, and also to stop metal objects (for example, fallen window blind slats) from becoming live if lodged between the wall and a partly pulled out plug. The length of the sleeves prevents any live contacts from being exposed while the plug is being inserted or removed. An early method of sleeving the pins involving spring loaded sleeves is described in the 1967 British Patent GB1067870. The method actually adopted is described in the 1972 British Patent GB1292991. Plugs with such pins were available in the 1970s, a Southern Electricity/RoSPA safety pamphlet from 1978 encourages their use. Sleeved pins became required by the standard in 1984.

It has been commonplace in the UK since the 1960s, and mandatory for the last thirty years, to design plugs in this way.

No need to drag the whole world into this... I was speaking about American electrical code, not global. Must Americans always precede every sentense with "In America" when exchanging ideas on the Internet (that America invented). Aren't you just a guest here? hehe.
 

GenesisNemesis

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I'm pretty used to sitting and doing nothing since that's what I usually do.
 

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Not true at all... the prongs on any plug are live just a few mm in.. not a few mm out. This is why it has recently become good practice (but not code) to mount 3 pronged outlets "upside down". That is, with the center ground pin "up" (upside down face). This is to prevent a short if the plug is partially inserted and an object slides down the wall at hits the prongs... it would only hit either the common or hot , as well as the ground... but not both hot and common.
I lost a good metal tape measure, and nearly lost an unobservant SO to this scenario.

The OP. I can happily sit waiting for things, thinking my own thoughts, and have experienced enough 240v and 50v shocks that I am not keen to volunteer for more. But I would share Emily Lake's problem that I might get too involved in what I was thinking and get carted off to the rubber room.

Nothing wrong with the rubber room. The bouncy balls bounce extra well there.
 

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I have no problem sitting by myself and being alone with my thoughts.

...

So that button shocks me? That's weird.

...

Ya, my thoughts are great. I'm an interesting person.

...

So what does a "mild" electric shock mean anyways?

...

How bad could it be?

...

It's a new experience.

...

But that's stupid. Why would anyone choose to do something that dumb?

...

Ow. That hurt.
 

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Electric shock can be pleasurable. Especially when you control the voltage and who gets shocked.
 

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That I'm God
...

But that's stupid. Why would anyone choose to do something that dumb?

...

Ow. That hurt.

...

I wonder if I could build up a tolerance?

Well, you have to figure that once you know what the shock feels like and can prepare yourself for it, it wouldn't have nearly the impact it does the first time you get shocked.

There's really only one way to find out for sure, though.
 

Emily Lake

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Well, you have to figure that once you know what the shock feels like and can prepare yourself for it, it wouldn't have nearly the impact it does the first time you get shocked.

There's really only one way to find out for sure, though.
I question your assumption. You may be able to prepare yourself for the pain associated with the shock, provided it's a relatively low level of pain. But it is still electricity entering your body. I don't know that it's a good assumption that one can condition themselves to continued external electrical jolts being applied to the system.
 

fromderinside

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Well, you have to figure that once you know what the shock feels like and can prepare yourself for it, it wouldn't have nearly the impact it does the first time you get shocked.

There's really only one way to find out for sure, though.
I question your assumption. You may be able to prepare yourself for the pain associated with the shock, provided it's a relatively low level of pain. But it is still electricity entering your body. I don't know that it's a good assumption that one can condition themselves to continued external electrical jolts being applied to the system.

Why not. You tolerate radiation to get a tan.

The question is poorly formed. Humans are active social beings. Typically thought is performed in preparation for action. Knowing the button will give one a shock sets the table for preparing to take the shock.
 

Emily Lake

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I question your assumption. You may be able to prepare yourself for the pain associated with the shock, provided it's a relatively low level of pain. But it is still electricity entering your body. I don't know that it's a good assumption that one can condition themselves to continued external electrical jolts being applied to the system.

Why not. You tolerate radiation to get a tan.
False assumption :p I don't tan.

The question is poorly formed. Humans are active social beings. Typically thought is performed in preparation for action. Knowing the button will give one a shock sets the table for preparing to take the shock.
I think there's maybe a difference here. Maybe it's a line in the sand on a spectrum.

Yes, if you know that someone is going to say, punch you in the stomach, you can prepare for it and brace, so it doesn't hurt as much. If you know that a pain is coming you can prepare so that it doesn't surprise you. In some cases, you can accustom your body to absorb some types of impacts and become inured to them.

On the other hand, however, I don't think that "knowing it's coming" is going to do much to condition one against lobotomization. I can't imagine it's going to help you condition yourself against amputation. I don't think you can train yourself to become inured to water in your lungs from drowning.

Some pains are not injurious, or are only low-level injuries that aren't actually dangerous. I'm not entirely sure if this is the case with electricity. A very short, one-time shock is probably not a problem... but given that our brains and our entire system essentially runs on electricity, I'm not certain that "preparing" for it mentally is actually all it takes. Mental preparation might reduce the surprise and the perceived pain of it, but I don't think it will reduce the actual current or voltage that is passing through your body and potentially causing damage to your system.

Maybe I'm wrong. I just don't think that you can "willpower" electricity into not being electrical in nature.
 
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