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Your best chili recipes

rousseau

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Unfortunately I don't have a ton to contribute to this thread as I just got into cooking chili a few months ago, but I'm wondering what others consider some of the best chili they make?

I just started making this recipe from All Recipes a few months ago, which is quite good:

The Best Vegetarian Chili in the World

I add extra onion, an additional jalapeno pepper, a dash of cayenne, garlic to taste, and I cook my own beans rather than using canned. As of yet I haven't found green chili peppers, so that hasn't made it's way into the recipe yet.
 

Keith&Co.

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I try a variety of chili recipes, but I get really good results from adding a can of refried beans to any pot of chili.
Thickens the stew and retains heat like a banked fire.
 

Treedbear

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Refering to the recipe link -
White onions prefered over other types in Mexican foods.
I imagine fresh poblanos qualify as green chilis and are widely available. I use lots of them.
Many more varieties of beans if you use dried ones. I like half "small red beans" and half black beans (also small). Garbanzo beans seem a bit weird.
If you like heat put the jalapenos and cayenne in towards end of cooking.
 

ronburgundy

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I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.
 

rousseau

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I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.

What do you use for the base?
 

Treedbear

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I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.

:bow:
 

Treedbear

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What do you use for the base?

I imagine he puts the fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder all into a blender to make the sauce.
 

ronburgundy

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What do you use for the base?

I imagine he puts the fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder all into a blender to make the sauce.

Very close. I blend everything you list, except for the onion and half the poblanos which get diced and added to the chili. I make it very thick and hearty, so it's probably 2/3 lamb meat.
But if want to thin it out one could also add some stock like turkey, chicken or pork (don't think beef would work well). Also, subbing some of the lamb for pork can create more texure complexity and mellow out the "gaminess" of the lamb (for those who don't love lamb as much as I do).
 

rousseau

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...
What do you use for the base?

I imagine he puts the fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder all into a blender to make the sauce.

Very close. I blend everything you list, except for the onion and half the poblanos which get diced and added to the chili. I make it very thick and hearty, so it's probably 2/3 lamb meat.
But if want to thin it out one could also add some stock like turkey, chicken or pork (don't think beef would work well). Also, subbing some of the lamb for pork can create more texure complexity and mellow out the "gaminess" of the lamb (for those who don't love lamb as much as I do).

Do you mind letting us know the usual proportions of the ingredients? This sounds fantastic, wouldn't mind giving similar a try.
 

fast

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I find that making chili is an artful enterprise that is always in a process that’s slowly evolving such that the exact recipe is not precisely followed. I make chili the hard way and it gets harder each time, so I break the endeavor up into stages.

First, i’ll prepare what we can dub the secret spice mix. You can measure out the ingredients and put it in a spice container. When you’re ready to make your next batch of chili, simply open and pour —not to mention save a lot of kitchen time.

The 7 ingredients: Chili powder, Oregano, cumin, Regular table salt, Course black pepper, Crushed red pepper flakes, Nestle nesquik. The amounts available upon request.

Let’s say you do that on a Friday night because you want chili Saturday night. Well, Saturday morning, cut up the veggies and get the prep work out the way.

The 6 ingredients for the veggie mix: Green bell pepper, red bell pepper, jalapeño pepper, onion, Garlic, celery.

After cutting it up, throw the mix in a lidded bowl and into the fridge. All that slicin’, dicin’, cuttin’, and cleanin’, who wants to be a cookin’?

When it gets time to start cooking (later in the day), go ahead and open up your can goods:

The 4 can goods are: diced tomatoes, tomato paste, kidney beans, pinto beans

Time to start a cookin’:

Pull out your two meats: 3 lbs of ground beef and a single full size smoked rogerwood sausage
Cook them independently and throw in strainer. The sausage should be cut quarter size (so they look like twenty-five cent pieces/quarters.

Pull out a huge pot, add a little bit of olive oil and cook the veggie mix until it’s good and seared. Throw in the cooked meats and two cans of tomato goods. Stir. Throw in the spices and beans.

The only thing I didn’t mention is water. Use a cup of beef broth in its stead. A couple hours on low and it’s ready. The texture is awesome. The heat is spot on. The taste is off the chain.

Like I said, it’s constantly evolving, but the baseline is intact. I’ll experiment with other things, but the changes are slight.
 

Wiploc

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Vegetarian Chili, Wiploc Style

In a large heavy pot, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add:

- Onion, 1 chopped;

- Bell pepper, 2 chopped, colors;

- Garlic, maybe 12 cloves, thick sliced

- Serrano peppers (I just stem and cut them in half), or jalapeños, 2 or 3.

After 3 minutes, or when the veggies are soft, add

- Chili powder, 1 tbs (Emeril uses twice that);

- Cumin, ground, 1/2 tbs, (Emeril uses twice that);

- Salt, 1 tsp of whatever's handy;

- Pepper, a few grinds;

- Cayenne, some (or not);

- Garlic powder, a palmful; and

- Oregano, Thyme, and/or paprika, if you incline, in quantities unspecified.

After 30 seconds, or when spices are fragrant (like I could tell), add

- Beer, water, or stock. (Beer is best, because some tomato flavors are alcohol soluble. That is, you won't get the full flavor without alcohol. On the other hand, the alcohol doesn't all cook out; so, no alcohol for those adversely affected.)

- Tomatoes (I used a 28oz can of crushed. Chopped would work. Emeril uses fresh tomatoes plus tomato sauce. Whatever.)

- Rotel or equivalent, if handy.

- Yams, 1 big or two small, chopped small so they cook fast and the flavor goes everywhere (Yams are the red ones, but if you're in a region where the red ones are called sweet potatoes, then use sweet potatoes‒though there are no yams of any kind in Emeril's recipe, for which he is more to be pitied than censored);

- Carrots, sliced into coins, and cut again if the coins are too large for the carrot to have friends in the spoon, about as much carrot as bell pepper;

- Corn from 3 or 4 ears (or frozen, what the heck, but fresh corn for preference, because it really does add flavor and texture);

- Mushrooms, 1 1/2 lbs (about 5 large) wiped clean (I just rinse) stemmed (ha) and cubed (big pieces, they shrink a lot);

- Beans, 2 or 3 cans of black (or kidney, whatever);

- Zucchini, none because it gets mushy, unless you want to puree it or maybe chop it really fine, in which case 1 or 2;

After six minutes. Lower the heat to medium low, and simmer. Emeril says it's done after 20 minutes, but what would he know? It has tomatoes in it; give it at least an hour.

When you take it off the heat, you can stir in

- a handful of chopped cilantro.

If feeling fancy, you can garnish with

- chopped green onions;

- shredded cheese;

- Sour cream or Greek yogurt;

- sliced avocado

You could serve this over

- Brown rice,

But we always eat it with

- Corn bread.

Yum.
 

Wiploc

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[FONT=&quot]Chili Recipe[/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 lbs lean meat.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 big yellow onion[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 green pepper[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 can kidney beans[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 cans black beans[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 little can chopped green pepper[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 can Rotel substitute[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 big cans crushed tomatoes[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Salt[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Pepper[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Cumin[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Chili powder[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Garlic[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]---[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Small Chili Recipe[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 lb Italian sausage[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 onion.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 green peppers[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2 cans black beans[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 little can chopped green pepper[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 can Rotel substitute[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1 big can crushed tomatoes[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]beer, half a can[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]salt[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]pepper[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]cumin[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]chili power[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]garlic[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Errata: [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]I brown the sausage links, then split them lengthwise and slice into bites.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Then throw everything in the pot but half the onion and half the bell pepper. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Simmer for an hour or so.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Add the reserved onion and pepper late, so it will still have some crunch. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Lots of garlic. [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]Kidney beans work fine. I prefer black beans.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]I leave you to decide what to do with the rest of the beer. [/FONT]

Addendum: Sausage? I don't remember ever using sausage. We use ground buffalo.
 

rousseau

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I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.

For the record, I read this recipe to my wife last night, and she immediately asked for a divorce and for your number.
 

Derec

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I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.

Dinner at Ron Burgundy's house?
 

fast

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I've won some awards with my chili verde. I don't use a precise recipe, but it's a beanless lamb chili with fire roasted tomatillos, poblanos, pickled jalapenos, garlic, onion, cumin, mexican oregano, and hatch chili powder from New Mexico. I use lamb shoulder chops that I first sear over a fire, then dice into small cubes, put it all into a cast-iron dutch oven and bake at 300 for a few hours.

At serving, I top with toasted hulled pumpkin seeds (pepitas), drizzle with a goat sour cream (a blend soft goat cheese into sour cream) and serve with a southern cornbread baked in a cast iron pan with some smoking hot bacon fat.

For the record, I read this recipe to my wife last night, and she immediately asked for a divorce and for your number.
I have been itching to respond to this, and I’m no expert on the luxury alternatives and substitutes from around the globe. I had no idea what “verde” meant, but most of all, I felt that my tone would not come across as joshingly as I would have hoped, and I certainly didn’t want to create an air of offense to Ronburgundy, especially over chili, so I elected to let those supressable and what I thought fleeting thoughts pass.

I’m not saying that it might not be delightful—his recipe, and granted, I haven’t heard of half the items listed, but there has to be a point whereby what something is called no longer remains being that. I mean, if I write my recipe for pizza and call it my chili recipe, what you have created when following the recipe is confusion between the disconnect.

If I put tea leaves in water, all the stirring in the world won’t yield orange juice. So, to that end, I decided to look up that “v” word: it had something to do with “green.”

That kind of opens the door in a way, I think, to the idea that his creation is more along the lines of chili substitute, which kind of lends itself to what I’m talking about. That’s not to say his confounded recipe of heaven isn’t to be glorified and honored for global perfection at its finest, and as far as I’m concerned, the addition of his recipe has a home here in this thread, not as a contender for the finest chili recipe but as an alternative to it.

See, it’s important to realize I’m not talking trash; instead, I have nothing but positive, but if phone numbers are to be exchanged and wedding vows reconsidered, just be wary of yogurt masquerading as homemade ice-cream. You can call something whatever you like, and when it comes to chili, remember, at some point, what is boasted and propped up as chili might just be something else—maybe something far better.

He he he he

Seriously guys, this is all in gest, funnin’ around a bit.
 

rousseau

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Unfortunately I don't have a ton to contribute to this thread as I just got into cooking chili a few months ago, but I'm wondering what others consider some of the best chili they make?

I just started making this recipe from All Recipes a few months ago, which is quite good:

The Best Vegetarian Chili in the World

I add extra onion, an additional jalapeno pepper, a dash of cayenne, garlic to taste, and I cook my own beans rather than using canned. As of yet I haven't found green chili peppers, so that hasn't made it's way into the recipe yet.

Over the past few years I used the above chili as a base, and kept iterating it. This is how it stands now:

Ingredients:
- 2 cans Crushed Tomato
- 1 can Diced Tomato (unseasoned or with herbs)
- 2 Bell Peppers
- 2 Jalapeno Peppers (3 for more spice)
- 5 to 10 Pickled Pepperoncini Peppers
- 2 Stalks of Celery
- 1 Medium or Large Onion
- 4 to 7 Cloves of Garlic
- 2 to 4 Cups of Beans (any variety)
- 1 lb ground or stewing, beef or chicken
- 1 can whole kernel corn (optional)
- 3 Roma Tomatoes (optional)

Seasoning (prepare in these quantities to make 1 batch of the mixture, only 1/3 to 1/2 cup for one batch of chili)
- 3 tablespoons chili powder
- 1 tablespoon ground cumin
- 1 teaspoon paprika (use smoked paprika, if desired)
- 1 teaspoon cocoa powder
- 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
- 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
- 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
- 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
- 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions
1) Chop Onion and Vegetables, Mince Cloves of Garlic
2) In a separate pan begin browning meat
3) In large pot begin cooking onion just under medium, cook until translucent
4) Add peppers, celery and cook them through
5) Cover pot and cook vegetables for 5 minutes on medium-low
6) With a few minutes left for vegetables stir in a quarter of the seasoning
6) Add meat/juices to vegetables
7) Add one can of tomato, 1/3 of the beans, another portion of seasoning, 1/3 garlic, stir
8) Repeat step 7 twice for following tomato cans/beans/chili/seasoning/garlic (the garlic will be poached in the chili rather than fried)
9) Heat chili through by bringing it to a bubble on medium high
10) Reduce heat to a few notches under medium and cook, stirring occasionally, for an hour
11) Add salt to taste
12) Dice Roma Tomatoes in large chunks and stir into chili with 15 - 20 minutes left (optional)
13) With five minutes left stir in Whole Kernel Corn (optional)
 

steve_bank

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Garlic, onions, peppers fried in oil.
Crushed tomatoes mixed with tomato paste.
Canned black beans.
Cilantro, garlic powder, cumin, curry powder, chili powder, cayenne pepper.
Hot sauce.
A little vinegar.
Chicken or beef tips.
 

rousseau

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I can't do canned beans, too salty. We cook our own beans in bulk and freeze.

Hot sauce sounds good, but I'm the only one who likes heat.
 

steve_bank

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I soaked beans lat night and just finished cooking. Made some ground beef. It will be chili for the next 3 days.
 

rousseau

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I can't do canned beans, too salty. We cook our own beans in bulk and freeze.

Hot sauce sounds good, but I'm the only one who likes heat.
I rinse canned beans before I use them. That might help.

Cooking / Freezing works pretty well. IIRC, they last about 6 months in the freezer, so you can cook a few kilograms of beans every few months and you're good to go. I figure this is the healthier way to do it.

We have two Dutch Ovens which helps.
 
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