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Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) derail from student loans thread

Trausti

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Make college lower cost at state institutions. Elite istitutions can still charge whaever they want. But fund state institutions to provide an exceptional education at an affordable rate.

Yes. Fire the diversocrats and streamline the administration. Save lots of $$$, lower tuition.
 

laughing dog

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Make college lower cost at state institutions. Elite istitutions can still charge whaever they want. But fund state institutions to provide an exceptional education at an affordable rate.

Yes. Fire the diversocrats and streamline the administration. Save lots of $$$, lower tuition
How much do you think that will reduce expenses?
 

Trausti

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Make college lower cost at state institutions. Elite istitutions can still charge whaever they want. But fund state institutions to provide an exceptional education at an affordable rate.

Yes. Fire the diversocrats and streamline the administration. Save lots of $$$, lower tuition
How much do you think that will reduce expenses?

FG607_CX0AYZLOp


Univ Michigan 2021 salaries (link) reveal 126 diversicrats at an average salary of $93,600 with 38 making >$100K and a high of $430,795. Total payroll cost >$15M = in-state tuition for almost 1000 students.
 

laughing dog

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Make college lower cost at state institutions. Elite istitutions can still charge whaever they want. But fund state institutions to provide an exceptional education at an affordable rate.

Yes. Fire the diversocrats and streamline the administration. Save lots of $$$, lower tuition
How much do you think that will reduce expenses?

FG607_CX0AYZLOp


Univ Michigan 2021 salaries (link) reveal 126 diversicrats at an average salary of $93,600 with 38 making >$100K and a high of $430,795. Total payroll cost >$15M = in-state tuition for almost 1000 students.
There are roughly 48,000 full time students at the University of Michigan. You are talking about 1/48 or a 2.1% increase in students. And that assumes, of course, that all of those people are
1) "useless", and
2) not funded by specific grants for specific functions.
 

Metaphor

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Make college lower cost at state institutions. Elite istitutions can still charge whaever they want. But fund state institutions to provide an exceptional education at an affordable rate.

Yes. Fire the diversocrats and streamline the administration. Save lots of $$$, lower tuition
How much do you think that will reduce expenses?

FG607_CX0AYZLOp


Univ Michigan 2021 salaries (link) reveal 126 diversicrats at an average salary of $93,600 with 38 making >$100K and a high of $430,795. Total payroll cost >$15M = in-state tuition for almost 1000 students.
There are roughly 48,000 full time students at the University of Michigan. You are talking about 1/48 or a 2.1% increase in students. And that assumes, of course, that all of those people are
1) "useless", and
2) not funded by specific grants for specific functions.
I'd go stronger than 'useless'. I'd say actively harmful.
 

Trausti

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There are roughly 48,000 full time students at the University of Michigan. You are talking about 1/48 or a 2.1% increase in students. And that assumes, of course, that all of those people are
1) "useless", and
2) not funded by specific grants for specific functions.
The DIE crowd are completely useless. And that's just one example of the administrative bloat at universities. If you let 1/3 of the non-teaching bureaucrats go, would anyone notice? Would anyone care? If the students were offered the choice of keeping the dross or a drop in tuition, which do you think they'd pick?
 

Rhea

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Jason has chosen to misrepresent the professionals by mis-labeling Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) with the label “DIE”. Haha. Jason - now that you see this, if it was a mistake, not a choice, you can correct yourself. I suspect it was a choice to mock, though, which ironically says a lot about why DE&I are needed.

Others claim that these professionals are “harmful,” and that they serve “grievance studies” which again is chock full of irony as the typical topics by these people are only about grievance.

But as a hiring manager, I am very glad to have DEI professionals helping a larger pool of employees become ready for the workplace. This is something my company needs and I want more of. My colleagues and I reach out to DEI groups at colleges to help us in recruiting, and we reach out to help them with development, with quite a few technical professional volunteering to coach and mentor students identified for us by DEI at the college here in town.

So contrary to the snark and insults that the White Grievance crowd heaps upon the effort, businesses are quite supportive.
 

laughing dog

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There are roughly 48,000 full time students at the University of Michigan. You are talking about 1/48 or a 2.1% increase in students. And that assumes, of course, that all of those people are
1) "useless", and
2) not funded by specific grants for specific functions.
The DIE crowd are completely useless. And that's just one example of the administrative bloat at universities. If you let 1/3 of the non-teaching bureaucrats go, would anyone notice? Would anyone care? If the students were offered the choice of keeping the dross or a drop in tuition, which do you think they'd pick?
Please define "administrative bloat" and then please produce data-driven estimates on the cost saving.

I ask, because your example about diversity, equity and inclusion didn't show much savings (and that assumed that all of the people in your example were useless and there no grant-funds supported any positions). Which suggests to me that there is no reason to expect your "administrative bloat" reduction burp would generate much savings either.

Frankly, your rhetoric suggests you know very little at all about universities.
 

Jason Harvestdancer

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Jason has chosen to misrepresent the professionals by mis-labeling Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) with the label “DIE”. Haha. Jason - now that you see this, if it was a mistake, not a choice, you can correct yourself. I suspect it was a choice to mock, though, which ironically says a lot about why DE&I are needed.

Others claim that these professionals are “harmful,” and that they serve “grievance studies” which again is chock full of irony as the typical topics by these people are only about grievance.

But as a hiring manager, I am very glad to have DEI professionals helping a larger pool of employees become ready for the workplace. This is something my company needs and I want more of. My colleagues and I reach out to DEI groups at colleges to help us in recruiting, and we reach out to help them with development, with quite a few technical professional volunteering to coach and mentor students identified for us by DEI at the college here in town.

So contrary to the snark and insults that the White Grievance crowd heaps upon the effort, businesses are quite supportive.

I never used the term DEI or DIE. If you think I have, please find the quote where I did so. I used the term "grievance studies", which you attributed to unnamed others.

It is very well and good to say that HR persons are eager to hire people with those majors, but as someone outside HR I have never found that to be the case. HR managers are a rather timid lot, and operate by a "does it check the boxes" system with regards to filling positions. I have been working in engineering for over 2 decades, and even now with all that experience the fact that my degree is in math makes them reluctant to consider me. It doesn't fit the checkbox.

Sure, upper executives like to make announcements about how a wide range of degrees are good for business, the HR managers all mouth agreement while also hoping that the other HR managers will be the one to take the risk leaving them free to not take the risk. Checklists to preapprove even looking at the resume is the safest policy. Even if the safest policy is to use racist terms such as "white grievance" to describe people who see through the BS.
 

laughing dog

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Jason has chosen to misrepresent the professionals by mis-labeling Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) with the label “DIE”. Haha. Jason - now that you see this, if it was a mistake, not a choice, you can correct yourself. I suspect it was a choice to mock, though, which ironically says a lot about why DE&I are needed.

Others claim that these professionals are “harmful,” and that they serve “grievance studies” which again is chock full of irony as the typical topics by these people are only about grievance.

But as a hiring manager, I am very glad to have DEI professionals helping a larger pool of employees become ready for the workplace. This is something my company needs and I want more of. My colleagues and I reach out to DEI groups at colleges to help us in recruiting, and we reach out to help them with development, with quite a few technical professional volunteering to coach and mentor students identified for us by DEI at the college here in town.

So contrary to the snark and insults that the White Grievance crowd heaps upon the effort, businesses are quite supportive.
A private company in a capitalist country values DEI professionals because they help maintain or improve profitability via helping recruit productive employees. Sounds to me the opposite of useless or harmless.
 

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Jason has chosen to misrepresent the professionals by mis-labeling Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) with the label “DIE”. Haha. Jason - now that you see this, if it was a mistake, not a choice, you can correct yourself. I suspect it was a choice to mock, though, which ironically says a lot about why DE&I are needed.

Others claim that these professionals are “harmful,” and that they serve “grievance studies” which again is chock full of irony as the typical topics by these people are only about grievance.

But as a hiring manager, I am very glad to have DEI professionals helping a larger pool of employees become ready for the workplace. This is something my company needs and I want more of. My colleagues and I reach out to DEI groups at colleges to help us in recruiting, and we reach out to help them with development, with quite a few technical professional volunteering to coach and mentor students identified for us by DEI at the college here in town.

So contrary to the snark and insults that the White Grievance crowd heaps upon the effort, businesses are quite supportive.

I never used the term DEI or DIE. If you think I have, please find the quote where I did so. I used the term "grievance studies", which you attributed to unnamed others.

It is very well and good to say that HR persons are eager to hire people with those majors, but as someone outside HR I have never found that to be the case. HR managers are a rather timid lot, and operate by a "does it check the boxes" system with regards to filling positions. I have been working in engineering for over 2 decades, and even now with all that experience the fact that my degree is in math makes them reluctant to consider me. It doesn't fit the checkbox.

Sure, upper executives like to make announcements about how a wide range of degrees are good for business, the HR managers all mouth agreement while also hoping that the other HR managers will be the one to take the risk leaving them free to not take the risk. Checklists to preapprove even looking at the resume is the safest policy. Even if the safest policy is to use racist terms such as "white grievance" to describe people who see through the BS.
Heh. I’ve heard HR described as many things but ‘timid’ is completely new to me.
 

Rhea

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I never used the term DEI or DIE. If you think I have, please find the quote where I did so
My apologies. That was Trausti.
It is very well and good to say that HR persons are eager to hire people with those majors, but as someone outside HR I have never found that to be the case. HR managers are a rather timid lot, and operate by a "does it check the boxes" system with regards to filling positions. I have been working in engineering for over 2 decades, and even now with all that experience the fact that my degree is in math makes them reluctant to consider me. It doesn't fit the checkbox.
I’m not in HR. I’ve been working in Engineering for over 3 decades. (Beyond that I’ve also worked in banking and municipal government.) I didn’t say I was in HR, I said I was a “hiring manager”. Meaning I manage an engineering team, and I hire people. Engineers mostly, but occasionally math people, physics or chemists. And I don’t let HR force me to “check boxes.” I hire based on value to the team.


Sure, upper executives like to make announcements about how a wide range of degrees are good for business, the HR managers all mouth agreement while also hoping that the other HR managers will be the one to take the risk leaving them free to not take the risk. Checklists to preapprove even looking at the resume is the safest policy. Even if the safest policy is to use racist terms such as "white grievance" to describe people who see through the BS.
Since I’m not in HR, I’m not timid, and I’m not an upper executive, your comments are not reality based. Just grievance.

My post is about the value of DEI in universities to help supply me with high quality workforce. They do work that helps me. I value it and I make money off it (for my company).

Moreover, I was not talking only about non-STEM degrees, I was talking about what DEI does for me for STEM-degreed people.
 

Trausti

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There are roughly 48,000 full time students at the University of Michigan. You are talking about 1/48 or a 2.1% increase in students. And that assumes, of course, that all of those people are
1) "useless", and
2) not funded by specific grants for specific functions.
The DIE crowd are completely useless. And that's just one example of the administrative bloat at universities. If you let 1/3 of the non-teaching bureaucrats go, would anyone notice? Would anyone care? If the students were offered the choice of keeping the dross or a drop in tuition, which do you think they'd pick?
Please define "administrative bloat" and then please produce data-driven estimates on the cost saving.

I ask, because your example about diversity, equity and inclusion didn't show much savings (and that assumed that all of the people in your example were useless and there no grant-funds supported any positions). Which suggests to me that there is no reason to expect your "administrative bloat" reduction burp would generate much savings either.

Frankly, your rhetoric suggests you know very little at all about universities.
FFS. If those braying about the oppression of student loans actually gave a shit about the students, and not protecting those exploiting them, they'd question why universities have had explosive spending on non-teaching administrative staff while their graduates suffer long-term debt. It's no secret the tuition costs have increase at rates far greater than inflation. Where does the money go? To instruction? Fuck, no. If the administration at a public university cannot make tuition affordable while spending $$$ on fake jobs, those administrators should be fired.

As University administration salary rises, so does tuition



Hah, hah. Fuck you student. Get more loans.
 

Rhea

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Trausti has a lot of disdain for non-instructional staff at a university. His arguments are based, so far, on a paragraph of job descritption, and whatever he thinks from reading that is the sum total of the position’s contributions.

Experience with these positions for actual college students (including my white son) shows a far more valuable picture. These “non-instructional staff” have been the people who have helped my kids as they navigate classes, class selection, internship pursuit, and connections to the job market. Including for my white son.

So if one of these DEI staff positions helps a student - or 50 students - prepare their experiences and classes for success and helps them design a resume to show their accomplishments and gets them a better job 5 months sooner, it is hardly a “fuck you student,” but rather a meaningful impact against their cost of education.

Trausti has failed completely to address the point made earlier by Loren and others that much of the sudden increase in tuition has been due to a sudden decrease in public spending and the colleges, with the same payroll, are having to collect from a new source, the student.

Reiterating my opinion from earlier, I do believe the first problem to address is funding for trades education. We need more of those people, and we need them badly. Trades are wonderful for people who would like to stay in their community. No guarantees, of course, but more likely. Trades are wonderful for those who would like to control the length of their work-week. So there are good reasons in economic need for tradespeople and benefits of trades to show that society values these skills and promotes them.

The next thing is easy-peasy, and that is to reduce interest on existing student loans immediately, to no more than corporations pay to borrow from the government. Some usurious lendors may have a problem with this, I don’t care if they hurt, they’ve been extorting people for far too long; good riddance.

And then we can work on reducing salaries that represent 2% of student tuition.

Trausti’s outrage and desire to eliminate the non-instructional help provided by these staff, representing 2% of the cost of tuition is a step that says, “fuck you, student! I’m going to push my ideological agenda while letting you drown in high-interest loans because I only care about the 2% of your debt that offends my sensibilities.”


Student deserve better than to be used as slogans to crush attempts at diversity and equality.
 

thebeave

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Trausti has a lot of disdain for non-instructional staff at a university. His arguments are based, so far, on a paragraph of job descritption, and whatever he thinks from reading that is the sum total of the position’s contributions.

Experience with these positions for actual college students (including my white son) shows a far more valuable picture. These “non-instructional staff” have been the people who have helped my kids as they navigate classes, class selection, internship pursuit, and connections to the job market. Including for my white son.

So if one of these DEI staff positions helps a student - or 50 students - prepare their experiences and classes for success and helps them design a resume to show their accomplishments and gets them a better job 5 months sooner, it is hardly a “fuck you student,” but rather a meaningful impact against their cost of education.


Trausti has failed completely to address the point made earlier by Loren and others that much of the sudden increase in tuition has been due to a sudden decrease in public spending and the colleges, with the same payroll, are having to collect from a new source, the student.

Reiterating my opinion from earlier, I do believe the first problem to address is funding for trades education. We need more of those people, and we need them badly. Trades are wonderful for people who would like to stay in their community. No guarantees, of course, but more likely. Trades are wonderful for those who would like to control the length of their work-week. So there are good reasons in economic need for tradespeople and benefits of trades to show that society values these skills and promotes them.

The next thing is easy-peasy, and that is to reduce interest on existing student loans immediately, to no more than corporations pay to borrow from the government. Some usurious lendors may have a problem with this, I don’t care if they hurt, they’ve been extorting people for far too long; good riddance.

And then we can work on reducing salaries that represent 2% of student tuition.

Trausti’s outrage and desire to eliminate the non-instructional help provided by these staff, representing 2% of the cost of tuition is a step that says, “fuck you, student! I’m going to push my ideological agenda while letting you drown in high-interest loans because I only care about the 2% of your debt that offends my sensibilities.”


Student deserve better than to be used as slogans to crush attempts at diversity and equality.
So, if these DEI staff will even help out white kids, where does the "diversity and inclusion" aspect of their jobs come into play? And does it take a multi-6 figure salary to help someone write a resume, select classes, find internships, etc? I could see paying some $50k per year tops for that, but to pay them more than a physician? Or CEO of a small company? Makes no sense.

Is it safe to assume that you are OK with the status quo of university DEI employees and salaries, say as presented in the UoM chart?
 

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So, if these DEI staff will even help out white kids, where does the "diversity and inclusion" aspect of their jobs come into play?
Glad you asked. You can ask them as well, you know. Approach with a friendly and sincere question - avoid the accusatory “are you useless” tone that presumes you know more than you do, and just ask them humbly to explain what they know and you don’t….

It comes into play by training these staff members to know what the specific barriers different kinds of student will face. In the past, it was one-size fits all, and the things they did helped some students but not others. Now they have background and training to understand the specific needs of students coming from different backgrounds, and how to help them navigate what they actually need instead of only what white men need.

Some of the training is incredibly valuable for white men who are not typical white men. If you’re not “type A” these navigators can help you recognize that and create compensations for you to use to overcome your particular weaknesses And still get the interview and succeed at it.

And does it take a multi-6 figure salary to help someone write a resume, select classes, find internships, etc?
Here you have again reduced their contributions to a single paragraph, without understanding the whole. You name it like they are an individual contributor, when this person was a director, and manages teams. A common mistake to confuse entry level or ground level employees with those who are paid to set strategies and create long-term plans and manage the performance of others.

Moreover, I expect that the people with this training are not widely found, yet, and so they can command a higher salary. Your disdain of DEI training, ironically, makes the current DEI professionals more rare and more highly compensated.

Once we can get more people to understand and embrace the value of DEI, we won’t need specialists. But at the moment, the need that the students have for this service is not met by your run-of-the-mill advisors. Ironic, that your disdain for the need is what drives the price of it, yes?

Ultimately, no, the advisor level person would not be worth 300K. Even the director may not be that high when they are easy to find and the rest of the staff is better trained. But that is not first on my list for very obvious reasons - there are far bigger problems with a better immediate impact on student cost.

I could see paying some $50k per year tops for that, but to pay them more than a physician? Or CEO of a small company? Makes no sense.
Market pressures, my libertarian friend. Market pressures. Let’s make DEI mainstream, so that all college students have access, and the cost of it will go down. You’ll note that was on my list of things to attack, but it was not in the top two.

I would note, it’s not really even my #3, because I would go after athletic administrators first.
Is it safe to assume that you are OK with the status quo of university DEI employees and salaries, say as presented in the UoM chart?
No, it is not safe to assume that you know the nuances of my opinion. I don’t operate in Duplo-Blocks version of policy. I can think in nuances.

I said:
1. Attack deficiencies of Trade School access
2. Eliminate student loan interest or replace with fed rate
3. Look at University salary structure - and I’ll add some nuance
…3.1 Examine athletic departments and recall the mission of the school
…3.2 Examine administrators
…3.3 Examine instructional staff and increase salary for full time instructors and ensure the school is not pushing people into adjunct positions against their will, paying them less and losing good instructors
.….3.4 Perform better DEI training for all staff so that distinct positions are not needed just to fill deficiencies.
 

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There are roughly 48,000 full time students at the University of Michigan. You are talking about 1/48 or a 2.1% increase in students. And that assumes, of course, that all of those people are
1) "useless", and
2) not funded by specific grants for specific functions.
The DIE crowd are completely useless. And that's just one example of the administrative bloat at universities. If you let 1/3 of the non-teaching bureaucrats go, would anyone notice? Would anyone care? If the students were offered the choice of keeping the dross or a drop in tuition, which do you think they'd pick?
Please define "administrative bloat" and then please produce data-driven estimates on the cost saving.

I ask, because your example about diversity, equity and inclusion didn't show much savings (and that assumed that all of the people in your example were useless and there no grant-funds supported any positions). Which suggests to me that there is no reason to expect your "administrative bloat" reduction burp would generate much savings either.

Frankly, your rhetoric suggests you know very little at all about universities.
FFS. ....
FFS, your response is long on bs and short on facts - again. Your argument would be more convincing if you had better information to buttress your "opinion".

Diversity and inclusion efforts at universities refers to more than simply race-conscious efforts. For example, tt also refers to race-neutral groups such as first generation students, LGBTQ students, and foreign students. These efforts extend to recruiting students, helping them feel comfortable and welcome in campus, helping them with problems they may encounter, etc....
Rhea's post indicates that they help her white son at university.
 

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FFS. If those braying about the oppression of student loans actually gave a shit about the students, and not protecting those exploiting them, they'd question why universities have had explosive spending on non-teaching administrative staff while their graduates suffer long-term debt. It's no secret the tuition costs have increase at rates far greater than inflation. Where does the money go? To instruction? Fuck, no. If the administration at a public university cannot make tuition affordable while spending $$$ on fake jobs, those administrators should be fired.

As University administration salary rises, so does tuition



Hah, hah. Fuck you student. Get more loans.


It has been repeatedly pointed out that college spending has not been rising unreasonably. It's that the student's share of that cost is going up.
 

Loren Pechtel

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So if one of these DEI staff positions helps a student - or 50 students - prepare their experiences and classes for success and helps them design a resume to show their accomplishments and gets them a better job 5 months sooner, it is hardly a “fuck you student,” but rather a meaningful impact against their cost of education.

While you are right about the overall spending, what little contact I have had with DEI efforts (admittedly, this was back in the 80s) was uniformly negative. They would have been better served by chucking the whole thing, including the relevant employees. (Most extreme example of the problem: There was a document-eating bug that we warned everyone about how to steer clear of. Some had to learn the hard way. Most of the documents lost were trivial exercises, but occasionally people lost non-trivial things. I had worked out a procedure to recover the trashed documents and taught it to a couple of other people in the lab that I felt were sufficiently knowledgeable to do it without making a bigger mess. This teacher was the only person I ever encountered to hit the document-eater twice. I got her document back, minus about 4 lines that were lost because my procedure added about 4 lines of crap--the normal route was simply to delete the crap but it had pushed her document beyond the maximum possible size. Her reaction to my failure to get those 4 lines was to try to get me fired because I was obviously anti-Hispanic. Sorry, but that sort of thing was way beyond my job description, they didn't even offer any class that came close to teaching what was needed to figure out the procedure.)
 

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what little contact I have had with DEI efforts (admittedly, this was back in the 80s) was uniformly negative.
Sounds like you had trouble with one person, 40 years ago.

I feel like that points to a pretty good record…
 

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what little contact I have had with DEI efforts (admittedly, this was back in the 80s) was uniformly negative.
Sounds like you had trouble with one person, 40 years ago.

I feel like that points to a pretty good record…
It is a good record.

Besides An anecdotal evidence of a sample of one is not terribly convincing. For example, over the years I have many interactions with computer coders and IT people of which the vast majority have been unpleasant and unhelpful. But I have not concluded that coders or IT personnel are uniformly negative or useless.
 

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what little contact I have had with DEI efforts (admittedly, this was back in the 80s) was uniformly negative.
Sounds like you had trouble with one person, 40 years ago.

I feel like that points to a pretty good record…

No. I had a problem with everyone involved that I encountered. I simply presented the worst offender.
 

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This is just my personal experience with DEI. I've been with my company for 16 years and since DEI became a major focus (pushed regularly by our CEO) I've noticed an improvement in management. We went from folks in management hot stepping around like they have a bollard up the ass pushing every ounce of work on their lessors and never being around when the shit hit's the fan to people who actually pull their weight and respect the office.
 

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11,861
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USA
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Nonpracticing agnostic
My opinion is that there are a few factors leading to this situation. Many people in the US are overpaid. College cost, healthcare, and some other costs seem to go up much faster than cost of living and I wish there were something that could curtail that. On the other hand, this specific person also has a J.D. which has a large range of salary. Her salary is about 90th percentile for the degree and that is probably because it is a high level position at an institution of tens of thousands of students. She also has an undergraduate degree from an Ivy League school and years of experience as a defense attorney and in other high level diversity roles which means in order to retain her the school has to offer a high salary.

While I am sure that there is a rational discussion to be had about salaries, typical conservative lashing out and poisoning the well by misrepresenting things does not lead to such discussion. For example, she never said she was fighting oppression through "mindfulness breathing." That is a dirty trick, quote-mining, just like Creationists do. What she actually wrote was that her job goes beyond the 9-to-5 hours and she has to find balance between work and non-work. One of her techniques is mindfulness breathing--it has nothing to do with fighting oppression tactics.
 

Derec

Contributor
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
22,969
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Atlanta, GA
Basic Beliefs
atheist
Trausti has a lot of disdain for non-instructional staff at a university.
Some non-instructional staff is needed for sure. However, there has been a big increase in such staff over the last few decades. Are you arguing it was all needed?
Student deserve better than to be used as slogans to crush attempts at diversity and equality.
Those two are often in conflict. The go-to strategy for increasing "diversity" (which in leftist speak means fewer white males) is discriminating against certain students and giving race- and gender-based advantages to others.
Notably though, the left never criticizes so-called "HBCUs" as lacking diversity even though they tend to be 90% or more black. Why is that?
I mean, I volunteer to be hired by Morehouse to act as a $400k "director of diversity" ...
 

laughing dog

Contributor
Joined
Dec 29, 2004
Messages
22,242
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Minnesota
Gender
IT
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Dogs rule
Trausti has a lot of disdain for non-instructional staff at a university.
Some non-instructional staff is needed for sure. However, there has been a big increase in such staff over the last few decades. Are you arguing it was all needed?
Student deserve better than to be used as slogans to crush attempts at diversity and equality.
Those two are often in conflict. The go-to strategy for increasing "diversity" (which in leftist speak means fewer white males) is discriminating against certain students and giving race- and gender-based advantages to others.
Increasing "diversity" usually means increasing the numbers of students from under-served demographic groups. It usually does not mean fewer white males. Do you have evidence to support your claim about "leftist speak"?
Notably though, the left never criticizes so-called "HBCUs" as lacking diversity even though they tend to be 90% or more black. Why is that?
I mean, I volunteer to be hired by Morehouse to act as a $400k "director of diversity" ...
Can you point to any HBCU policy or protocols that serve to dissuade or deny non-black students to apply or be admitted? If not, you have answered your own question (if you think about it).

BTW, did you know
In the 1930s, many Jewish intellectuals fleeing Europe after the rise of Hitler and anti-Jewish legislation in prewar Nazi Germany following Hitler's elevation to power emigrated to the United States and found work teaching in historically black colleges.[22][23] In particular, 1933 was a challenging year for many Jewish academics who tried to escape increasingly oppressive Nazi policies,[24] particularly after legislation was passed stripping them of their positions at universities.[24] Jews looking outside of Germany could not find work in other European countries because of calamities like the Spanish Civil War and general antisemitism in Europe.[25][24] In the US, they hoped to continue their academic careers, but barring a scant few, found little acceptance in elite institutions in Depression-era America, which also had their own undercurrent of antisemitism.[23][26]

As a result of these phenomena, more than two-thirds of the faculty hired at many HBCUs from 1933 to 1945 had come to the United States to escape from Nazi Germany.[27] HBCUs believed the Jewish professors were valuable faculty that would help strengthen their institutions' credibility.[28] HBCUs had a firm belief in diversity and giving opportunity no matter the race, religion, or country of origin.[29] HBCUs were open to Jews because of their ideas of equal learning spaces. They sought to create an environment where all people felt welcome to study, including women.
Source -  Historically_black_colleges_and_universities
 
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