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Redistricting for the US House and the US state legislatures

lpetrich

Contributor
Every 10 years, after each census, each state's government redraws its US House of Representatives districts and its state-legislature districts. That is now happening.

 2020 United States redistricting cycle
Who controls the Congressional-seat redistricting process?
  • Republicans: 19 states, 184 seats
  • Democrats: 8 states, 75 seats
  • Bipartisan / split: 9 states, 63 seats
  • Independent commission: 8 states, 107 seats
  • Single seats: 6 states, 6 seats
Redistricting for state legislatures agrees with this with these exceptions:
  • Republican -> bipartisan / split: 1
  • Single seat -> Republican: 3, Democratic: 1, bipartisan / split: 1, independent commission: 1

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight - "An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond."

Watch out for this:  Gerrymandering -  Gerrymandering in the United States
 

Lumpenproletariat

Veteran Member
Why do we need these "districts" and arbitrary district boundaries?

Every 10 years, after each census, each state's government redraws its US House of Representatives districts and its state-legislature districts. That is now happening.

 2020 United States redistricting cycle
Who controls the Congressional-seat redistricting process?
  • Republicans: 19 states, 184 seats
  • Democrats: 8 states, 75 seats
  • Bipartisan / split: 9 states, 63 seats
  • Independent commission: 8 states, 107 seats
  • Single seats: 6 states, 6 seats
Redistricting for state legislatures agrees with this with these exceptions:
  • Republican -> bipartisan / split: 1
  • Single seat -> Republican: 3, Democratic: 1, bipartisan / split: 1, independent commission: 1

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight - "An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond."

Watch out for this:  Gerrymandering -  Gerrymandering in the United States

It's laughable.

There should be no such thing as Congressional districts. Nothing in the Constitution requires them.

There are 2 or 3 federal laws about it, but any state has the power to totally do away with its Congressional districts. It would be better for a state to just provide a list of statewide candidates for Congress which all citizens of the state could vote on, without connecting them to geographical "districts" which are meaningless.

A list of candidates could be provided to all voters, across the state, and a voter might be allowed to vote for more than one, depending on the number of seats, the state's population size, etc. Each state could have its own system. Nothing prevents a state from experimenting with a different system which eliminates the districts.

The drawing of these arbitrary district lines is unnecessary and leads to many forms of corruption.
 

Bomb#20

Contributor
It's laughable.

There should be no such thing as Congressional districts. Nothing in the Constitution requires them.

There are 2 or 3 federal laws about it, but any state has the power to totally do away with its Congressional districts. It would be better for a state to just provide a list of statewide candidates for Congress which all citizens of the state could vote on, without connecting them to geographical "districts" which are meaningless.

A list of candidates could be provided to all voters, across the state, and a voter might be allowed to vote for more than one, depending on the number of seats, the state's population size, etc. Each state could have its own system. Nothing prevents a state from experimenting with a different system which eliminates the districts.

The drawing of these arbitrary district lines is unnecessary and leads to many forms of corruption.
I basically agree; but there are a lot of methods for a state to "just provide a list of statewide candidates for Congress which all citizens of the state could vote on", and some of those methods are disastrous, so what you're proposing needs to be carefully thought through. The simplest and most popular version was quite correctly held unconstitutional in Rogers v Lodge, for the county involved.

The basic problem is this: suppose you have five seats and no districts, and 60% of the voters are Republicans and 40% are Democrats, and every voter is allowed to vote for up to five candidates, and the five candidates with the most votes get the five seats. Then if the Republican voters can largely agree among themselves on which five candidates to support, Republicans will get all five seats no matter how the Democrats vote. To have representative democracy there would need to be two Democrats elected.

There are obvious ways to get around this problem, such as giving each voter only one vote, or giving a voter five votes but letting her cast more than one of her votes for the same candidate; but those systems don't seem to have caught on. Actual at-large elections in the U.S. still generally use the simple stupid rule.
 

Jimmy Higgins

Contributor
Every 10 years, after each census, each state's government redraws its US House of Representatives districts and its state-legislature districts. That is now happening.

 2020 United States redistricting cycle
Who controls the Congressional-seat redistricting process?
  • Republicans: 19 states, 184 seats
  • Democrats: 8 states, 75 seats
  • Bipartisan / split: 9 states, 63 seats
  • Independent commission: 8 states, 107 seats
  • Single seats: 6 states, 6 seats
Redistricting for state legislatures agrees with this with these exceptions:
  • Republican -> bipartisan / split: 1
  • Single seat -> Republican: 3, Democratic: 1, bipartisan / split: 1, independent commission: 1

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight - "An updating tracker of proposed congressional maps — and whether they might benefit Democrats or Republicans in the 2022 midterms and beyond."

Watch out for this:  Gerrymandering -  Gerrymandering in the United States

It's laughable.

There should be no such thing as Congressional districts. Nothing in the Constitution requires them.

There are 2 or 3 federal laws about it, but any state has the power to totally do away with its Congressional districts. It would be better for a state to just provide a list of statewide candidates for Congress which all citizens of the state could vote on, without connecting them to geographical "districts" which are meaningless.

A list of candidates could be provided to all voters, across the state, and a voter might be allowed to vote for more than one, depending on the number of seats, the state's population size, etc. Each state could have its own system. Nothing prevents a state from experimenting with a different system which eliminates the districts.

The drawing of these arbitrary district lines is unnecessary and leads to many forms of corruption.
Corruption is a synonym, anagram, and a palindrome of Government. Okay, all three of those are not true, but the point is, we have districts, they aren't going anywhere, care to help deal with the real world?

Currently, gerrymandering is being exploited in several states. Texas, Maryland, Ohio, Florida. Pennsylvania was forced to go non-partisan and GOP lost seats there. There are solutions, generally computers and people without partisan agendas (they are called unelected bureaucrats in the campaign ads to not vote in favor of Amendment to create such a group of people).
 

lpetrich

Contributor
There should be no such thing as Congressional districts. Nothing in the Constitution requires them. ...
I basically agree; but there are a lot of methods for a state to "just provide a list of statewide candidates for Congress which all citizens of the state could vote on", and some of those methods are disastrous, so what you're proposing needs to be carefully thought through. The simplest and most popular version was quite correctly held unconstitutional in Rogers v Lodge, for the county involved.

The basic problem is this: suppose you have five seats and no districts, and 60% of the voters are Republicans and 40% are Democrats, and every voter is allowed to vote for up to five candidates, and the five candidates with the most votes get the five seats. Then if the Republican voters can largely agree among themselves on which five candidates to support, Republicans will get all five seats no matter how the Democrats vote. To have representative democracy there would need to be two Democrats elected.

There are obvious ways to get around this problem, such as giving each voter only one vote, or giving a voter five votes but letting her cast more than one of her votes for the same candidate; but those systems don't seem to have caught on. Actual at-large elections in the U.S. still generally use the simple stupid rule.
That's called the bloc vote, block vote, plurality-at-large voting, and  Multiple non-transferable vote

A partisan vote, like what Bomb#20 described, reduces to  General ticket - voting for a complete slate of candidates as if those candidates were a single candidate.

Multi-Member Districts: Just a Thing of the Past? – Sabato's Crystal Ball
 

Tigers!

Veteran Member
Why every ten years? That is along time to wait with expected population moves.

Why not review after every election? We do that in Australia so it is every three or four years.
 

Bomb#20

Contributor
What is the simple stupid rule? (For Bomb20)
If there are three seats up for grabs, they give you a ballot with all the candidates' names and a circle next to each name. The ballot says "Vote for no more than three". You put a mark in one, two or three of the circles. If you mark four or more circles they throw out your ballot; otherwise they count all the marked circles and the three candidates who got the most marks in their circles get the three seats. (You can find more details at lpetrich's link in post #5.)

This system is what's used in the U.S. for most elections for city councils and county supervisor boards. It used to be used in a lot of state and federal elections too, but for those it has mostly been replaced by gerrymandered districts. I suppose it was inevitable that we'd mostly have to have one or the other of those two systems, since they're the two easiest systems for the sitting government to corrupt. The corruption of gerrymandered districts is obvious; the corruption of "Multiple non-transferable vote" is subtler. If you're interested, check out Rogers v Lodge: a county in Georgia got caught using this system to make sure black candidates never won. The Supreme Court could have declared the system unconstitutional for the whole country, but instead they just ordered that county to stop using it.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
There is a way to get multimember-district members to approximately resemble their voters: proportional representation.

There are several ways to do that.

The most common is party-list, after the tradition of political parties publishing lists of who they want seated. One votes for a party, and the seats are divided up in proportion to how many votes each party received.

This allows multiple parties to compete, though they often form governing coalitions.

Party-list elections can be either closed list, where the party leaderships select all the candidates, or open list, where one can vote for whichever candidates one wants seated first.

A hybrid of party-list and single-member districts is mixed member. Everybody votes for both a district candidate and a party, and the list seats are allocated to make the entire chamber proportional.

A nonpartisan system with proportional results is single transferable vote. That is essentially instant runoff voting generalized to multiple seats, but with the twist that ballots for winning candidates then get downweighted. This is necessary to make the system proportional, because otherwise it degenerates into general ticket, as bloc voting does.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State - Oregon | FiveThirtyEight

Several states now have proposed maps. Some of them don't look very different from the existing map or from each other: AR, ID, IN, ME, NE.

But some of them have sizable differences.

Consider Colorado. Its redistricting commission has produced 4 maps so far. Colorado gained a seat; Dem +, Rep -
  • +47, +23, +15, +12, -12, -21, -22 (old) -- median +5.2 -- EG -5.7
  • +56, +25, +17, +8, +1, -14, -19, -28 -- median -1.8 -- EG -0.3
  • +55, +20, +16, +4, -3, -11, -15, -18 -- median -5.9 -- EG -1.4
  • +55, +32, +16, +4, 0, -15, -18, -26 -- median -4.2 -- EG -1.5
  • +55, +32, +16, +6, -3, -15, -18, -26 -- median -5.0 -- EG -1.6
Median = (median partisan lean) - (state overall partisan lean)

EG = efficiency gap = (wasted votes for D) - (wasted votes for R)
Wasted votes are votes that do not contribute to a victory: either (# votes) for a defeat or (# votes) - (victory margin) for a victory.

It looks like 3 D, 3 R, and 2 in between.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Oregon, my current home state, has some drama llama.

I couldn't think of a good summary, so I'll quote the whole thing: What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State - Oregon | FiveThirtyEight
After four days of public hearings, Oregon Democrats last week decided to cut off negotiations with Republicans and move ahead solo with their proposed congressional map — which would create five Democratic-leaning seats and just one Republican-leaning seat. The map passed the state Senate on a party-line vote on Sept. 20 but was expected to meet resistance in the state House, where Democrats and Republicans had agreed to share power on the redistricting committee in exchange for Republicans no longer staging walkouts to block legislative business. However, on Sept. 20, state House Speaker Tina Kotek backed out of that agreement, saying that Republicans were not willing to “engage constructively” in the redistricting process, and appointed a new, Democratic-majority congressional redistricting committee in the hopes of pushing the map through.

Republicans predictably reacted with fury and have reportedly discussed walking out of the legislature to block the passage of the map. As of Sept. 21, it was unclear what they would decide to do; Republicans and Democrats were deep in negotiations until a positive COVID-19 test caused the postponement of the day’s legislative agenda. The House is now expected to meet again on Saturday — rather than Wednesday — after someone who had been in the Capitol tested positive for COVID-19. The redistricting deadline is on Monday.
Ms. Kotek has an unfortunate last name, because it sounds like "Kotex", a brand of menstrual pads that goes back to 1920.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Oregon gained 1 seat in the recent Congressional redistricting.
  • Old: +48, +23, +4, -1, -19 -- median -5.4 -- EG +13.4
  • D: +38, +31, +11, +10, +9, -28 -- median -0.4 -- EG +17.0
  • R: +54, +35, +2, -2, -4, -18 -- median -10.3 -- EG +16.7
The Republican map is close to the current map, with heavily Republican District 2 to the east of the Cascade mountain range.

The Democratic one has District 3 annex some territory in the Cascades, and moves District 1 northward and northwestward, letting District 5 and the new District 6, both near Salem, get some of the Portland suburbs. District 4, which contains Eugene, moves up the coast, and sacrifices its southeastern part.

Oregon House Republicans boycott redistricting session, claim maps are unfair - OPB
House Republicans remained absent from the Oregon Capitol on Saturday afternoon, denying Democrats a quorum and blocking proposals for redrawing the state’s political districts that GOP lawmakers argue are unfair.

Despite a late attempt by Democrats to float a plan for new congressional districts not tilted as steeply in the majority party’s favor, Republicans elected to stall the Legislature’s redistricting effort. If the stalemate does not end by Monday, lawmakers will lose their once-a-decade chance to create new political maps, turning the process over to Secretary of State Shemia Fagan, a Democrat, and the courts.

Will Oregon Legislature have a quorum for redistricting Monday? - OPB
The deadline is the end of the workday on Monday.
If they miss the deadline, the job of redrawing congressional maps will fall to a panel of five retired judges appointed by the Oregon Supreme Court, and Democratic Secretary of State Shemia Fagan will be tasked with redrawing the state's legislative districts.

...
Saturday morning, Kotek unveiled a new proposed congressional map that some hoped would bring House Republicans back to the bargaining table. That proposal put the newest congressional district south of Portland and mostly east of Interstate 5, same as in a previous plan. But it makes several changes to the proposed borders of the other congressional districts, including keeping Portland and Bend in separate districts instead of combining them.
But that was not enough for the Republicans.

As I wrote this, Monday is today.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Turning to Iowa, we have only one map proposal:
  • (Old): -2, -4, -5, -28 -- Median +5.0 -- EG -41.6
  • (Only): +7, -2, -11, -33 -- Median +3.1 -- EG +8.8
Will the Iowa-legislature Republicans gerrymander all the districts into being at least Republican leaning?


Looking at New York, it has 26 districts, down from 27, so I won't try to catch all the numbers.
  • (Old): D 17, N 3, R 7 -- median -2.6 -- EG -1.3
  • "Letters": D 17, N 3, R 6 -- rel. to old map: R -1 -- median -4.7 -- EG +0.8
  • "Names": D 15, N 3, R 8 -- rel. to old map: D -2, R +1 -- median -4.5 -- EG -10.5
N = neither (competitive district)

Dave Wasserman on Twitter: "NEW YORK: strategists I've spoken w/ ..." / Twitter
NEW YORK: strategists I've spoken w/ tell me strong census numbers in NYC could help Dems purge as many as *five* of the eight GOP seats in the state.

In the hypothetical below, Dems would gerrymander the current 19D-8R map (left) into as brutal as a 23D-3R rout (right).

In the scenario above, only three Rs would be spared: Reps. Andrew Garbarino #NY02, Elise Stefanik #NY21 and Chris Jacobs #NY23.

Every Dem incumbent would get a double digit Biden seat (including Maloney #NY18 & Delgado #NY19).

A close-up view of NYC in the above scenario: Staten Island Rep. Nicole Malliotakis (R)'s #NY11 would take on Red Hook, Sunset Park & parts of Park Slope and flip from Trump +11 to Biden +10.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D)'s #NY14 would absorb some GOP parts of Westchester.

The only genuinely competitive seat on this map would be Rep. John Katko (R)'s #NY24, who has already proven he can win in a really blue seat.

The thinking here is that he might lose a primary on his right, in which case the new seat would be winnable for a Dem in a general.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Oregon with the most recent Democratic plan (D2):
  • Old: +48, +23, +4, -1, -19 -- median -5.4 -- EG +13.4
  • D: +38, +31, +11, +10, +9, -28 -- median -0.4 -- EG +17.0
  • R: +54, +35, +2, -2, -4, -18 -- median -10.3 -- EG +16.7
  • D2: +43, +34, +9, +7, +3, -28 -- median -2.7 -- EG +17.2
In the new Democratic plan, it's District 5 (east Salem) that extends out to Bend OR instead of District 3 (east Portland).
 

lpetrich

Contributor
New Oregon congressional map imminent after GOP walkout ends - POLITICO
reposted at Yahoo News as
New Oregon congressional map imminent after GOP walkout ends

The day still isn't done.

California is losing a congressional seat. Which one it loses could help the GOP control the House


Democrats say they oppose gerrymandering, but New York’s redistricting will test whether they mean it - The Washington Post
Reconfiguring New York’s congressional districts to benefit Democrats represents perhaps the party’s best shot at keeping the House majority. To do so, state Democrats will need to wrestle control of the redistricting process away from a bipartisan commission set up by voters after the last redrawing.

The temptation to do so will be great: This year marks the first time in a century that the New York Democrats have total control of state government, giving them autonomy over redistricting if they choose to take it.

...
The state’s new Democratic governor Kathy Hochul, who took over after the resignation of Andrew M. Cuomo, has signaled that she is prepared to leverage her position to help Democrats maximize the party’s gains in a way critics of her predecessor say he never did.

...
During the last redistricting in 2011, Democrats held the state Assembly, but Republicans had the majority in the state Senate. They failed to agree on a congressional map, and a federal court was forced to step in and draw the lines.

“New York has been willing to let even the last minute pass and to abdicate the whole of its redistricting power to a reluctant federal court,” the judges wrote at the time.

...
For that year’s legislative maps, Cuomo cut a deal with Republicans, and signed the GOP-majority state Senate’s gerrymandered map, in exchange for their support for a ballot referendum to end future partisan gerrymandering.

In 2014, voters approved a constitutional amendment to set up a separate entity outside the state legislature to control redistricting.

...
“Everyone is now seeing how awful Andrew Cuomo was, but one of his political manipulations was he supported Republicans in the state and that includes agreeing to their redistricting demands,” he said.

...
“I think it’s pretty likely they draw a Democratic gerrymander,” said Adam Podowitz-Thomas of the Princeton Gerrymandering Project, a nonpartisan group that analyzes gerrymandering. “There’s not a huge political cost — when it comes to the ballot box no one picks a politician based on whether they gerrymandered or not.”

...
“Nancy Pelosi understands the raw political calculations,” said David Wasserman, a veteran analyst of congressional redistricting for the Cook Political Report. “She understands the GOP is going to be aggressive and she is the farthest type of person who would unilaterally disarm.”
But not gerrymandering when the Republicans gerrymander will be unilateral disarmament.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Texas congressional map proposal adds new districts to Houston and Austin | The Texas Tribune - "Republicans constructed this map with incumbent protection in mind — a strategy that focused on bolstering Republican seats that Democrats targeted over the last two election cycles rather than aggressively adding new seats that could flip from blue to red."
While many incumbents appear safe in these maps, others were drawn into districts that overlap with one another — for example the proposed map pits Houston Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw against Democrat Rep. Sylvia Garcia. It also pits two Houston Democrats — Reps. Al Green and Sheila Jackson Lee — against each other.

...
If approved, the proposed map would narrow the battlefield of competitive races for both Democrats and Republicans.

Based on 2020 presidential election results, there will only be one district in the state — the 15th Congressional District in South Texas that has a margin between Biden and Trump voters that was less than five points.

As a result, nearly all endangered incumbents on both sides of the aisle will likely have easier paths to reelection.
Republicans plot to keep Texas red in redistricting - POLITICO
Republicans spent tens of millions of dollars in 2020 to keep Democrats from painting more of Texas blue. Now, the GOP is trying to fireproof its districts with a new map that contains the suburban damage they've suffered.

...
The end result is likely to give Republicans control of at least two dozen of the state’s 38 districts — but it is not expected to significantly reduce Democrats’ footprint, which grew slightly over the past 10 years. That's a far cry from the ruthless redistricting happening elsewhere — but also a realization of the GOP's already maxed-out advantage in Texas.

...
But the nature of Texas’ population eruption over the past decade creates limits — both demographic and geographic — on how far Republicans can go in pressing their partisan advantage. Texas is gaining two districts in reapportionment, more than any other state. Yet virtually all of Texas’ population growth came from nonwhite residents, and the exploding areas of the state are generally around major metro areas, which have been racing toward Democrats.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Texas’s New Congressional Map Could Give A Huge Boost To GOP Incumbents | FiveThirtyEight

  • (Old): D 8, N 6, R 22 -- median +2.3 -- EG -12.7
  • (1st): D 13, N 1, R 24 -- D +5, N -5, R +2 -- median -12.0 -- EG -15.3

Texas reduces Black and Hispanic congressional districts in proposed map | The Texas Tribune - "The proposed congressional map also increases the number of districts where Trump had a majority of voters over Biden in 2020 and protects Republican incumbents who might have been vulnerable by packing their districts with more Trump voters."


Lt. Governor Jon Husted would like to see more competitive voting districts in Ohio - YouTube
As Ohio’s plan to redraw legislative voting districts sits in limbo subject to a legal challenge, Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted is critiquing both Republicans and Democrats for what they brought to the bargaining table during the drafting phase.

Husted says neither party to the Ohio Redistricting Commission seemed particularly interested in creating more competitive districts, in a wide-ranging conversation on the 3 Things to Know with Stephanie Haney podcast.
CAIR, advocate groups sue GOP's legislative maps in Ohio

Maine redistricting commission reaches deal on Senate maps, avoiding court fight - the State Senate
 

Swammerdami

Squadron Leader
Staff member
While many incumbents appear safe in these maps, others were drawn into districts that overlap with one another — for example the proposed map pits Houston Republican Rep. Dan Crenshaw against Democrat Rep. Sylvia Garcia. It also pits two Houston Democrats — Reps. Al Green and Sheila Jackson Lee — against each other.

...
If approved, the proposed map would narrow the battlefield of competitive races for both Democrats and Republicans.
...
As a result, nearly all endangered incumbents on both sides of the aisle will likely have easier paths to reelection.
Republicans spent tens of millions of dollars in 2020 to keep Democrats from painting more of Texas blue. Now, the GOP is trying to fireproof its districts with a new map that contains the suburban damage they've suffered....

So, the Ds and Rs finally find an issue on which they can agree! A Bipartisan agenda! Protect the incumbents!!

Well, almost agree. The Rs will do all they can to maximize gerrymandering. Ds may litigate, but Scotus will decide, in a 5-4 or 6-3 decision, that gerrymandering is just fine.

I'm tempted to change my .sig to "American democracy is doomed. Get over it." But there might be a teeny bit of hope. If Millennials start vigorous protest soon.

Nah. American democracy is doomed. Get over it.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Democrats pass new Oregon congressional map after GOP walkout ends - POLITICO
The Oregon state House reached a grudging compromise on a new congressional map that would create four Democratic districts, a safe Republican seat and one potential battleground, bringing an end to a bitter partisan standoff.

...
The compromise map passed the state House on Monday afternoon in a 33-16 vote, and the state Senate concurred in an 18-6 vote. It now heads to Democratic Gov. Kate Brown's desk for her signature before midnight.

It was the capstone for a tough few days for Oregon Republicans, who were forced to choose between a series of bad choices that would determine their political fate at the state and federal level for the next decade.

...
The initial Democratic plan cracked Portland like a pinwheel, creating five seats that strongly favored Democrats, and one deep red seat in the eastern half of the state, currently held by GOP Rep. Cliff Bentz.

...
This new map places Democratic Rep. Kurt Schrader’s home in the most competitive district in the state, but even then it still favors Democrats.

Schrader could also choose to run in the state’s new 6th District. That seat, allotted to Oregon in reapportionment, leans more Democratic and includes some of Schrader’s old turf.

Democratic Rep. Peter DeFazio is a big winner under the map — his western Oregon seat becomes less competitive. Blumenauer and fellow Democratic Rep. Suzanne Bonamici will retain their deep-blue districts.
Oregon Legislature passes new legislative and congressional redistricting plans, sends them to Gov. Kate Brown for signature - oregonlive.com
Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, will now decide whether to sign the bills into law before midnight, the deadline set by the Oregon Supreme Court earlier this year when it gave state officials more time to complete redistricting due to U.S. Census delays.

“Because the bills would not take effect before midnight without her signature, my understanding is the governor would need to sign the bills before midnight to meet the deadline,” Brown’s deputy communications director Charles Boyle wrote in an email.

Boyle said the governor’s staff still needs to do some due diligence on the two redistricting bills but “barring any unforeseen issues the governor intends to sign the bills.”
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Gov. Brown signs Oregon redistricting into law | KOIN.com
Oregon state Republican lawmakers showed up for work Monday in the Capitol, resulting in a quorum to vote on the proposed map for redrawing the state’s congressional districts."

...
Republicans in the afternoon session said the new maps “makes it non-competitive” and called it “blatant and unabashed gerrymandering.”

Democrats, though, countered the maps “are fair and are representative, in line with legal requirements and reflect the immense population growth we’ve seen in Oregon.”

Congressional plans were sent to the redistricting committee to be formally adopted when the House reconvened Monday afternoon. After discussion on the House floor, the new district map passed.
Governor Kate Brown on Twitter: "For the first time in 40 years, Oregon is gaining a congressional seat––another member to advocate for the common good of all Oregonians. ..." / Twitter
For the first time in 40 years, Oregon is gaining a congressional seat––another member to advocate for the common good of all Oregonians. I just signed the redistricting bills passed by the Legislature today. Thank you to everyone who came together to get this done for Oregon. We as a state have faced numerous challenges the past 18+ months that have urgently required federal attention and resources, and I am grateful that the Legislature came together to pass today’s historic legislation. Thank you especially to Rep. @AndreaRSalinas and Senator Kathleen Taylor for their work as redistricting chairs.

Read my full statement:
State of Oregon Newsroom : NewsDetail : State of Oregon - "Governor Kate Brown Signs Redistricting Bills"

Oregon’s redistricting maps official, after lawmakers pass them, Gov. Kate Brown signs off - oregonlive.com
Oregon House passes redistricting bills | kgw.com


Third redistricting lawsuit: Ohio Statehouse maps dilute minority votes - "Recently approved Ohio Statehouse maps dilute the votes of Black Ohioans, Muslims and other minorities in the state, according to a third lawsuit filed at the Ohio Supreme Court Monday."
 

lpetrich

Contributor
What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight now has Oregon's new Congressional districts.

One can see in it a division between two of Colin Woodard's American nations: Democratic-leaning Left Coast and Republican-leaning Far West, with a split roughly at the Cascade mountain range.

Upcoming deadlines for states with proposed maps: AR, CO, IA, ID, IN, MD, ME, NE, NY, (OR), TX
  • ME: Sept. 30, 2021 - Deadline for commission to propose draft of congressional map - 1 commission, 1 Democratic, 1 Republican map
  • CO: Oct. 1, 2021 - Deadline to submit final congressional map to state Supreme Court - 4 commission maps
  • IN: Nov. 15, 2021 - Adjournment date for legislature (which takes first crack at enacting a map) - 1 Republican map
  • TX: Dec. 13, 2021 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 Republican map
  • NE: Jan. 5, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 Democratic, 1 Republican, 1 compromise map
  • NY: Jan. 15, 2022 - Deadline for commission to submit congressional map to legislature - 2 commission (D: "Letters", R: "Names") maps
  • AR: Feb. 22, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 2 Democratic, 6 Republican maps
  • MD: Feb. 22, 2022 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 commission map
  • IA: Feb. 28, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 commission map
  • ID: Feb. 28, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 2 commission maps
Commission = redistricting commission.

In New York, the redistricting commission's Democratic and Republican members have submitted separate maps, their "Letters" and "Names" maps. New York State Independent Redistricting Commission - Draft Plans has a map where one can toggle the various existing and proposed district boundaries.

Several states seem to have an informal deadline: when candidates start filing for their running for office.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
538's staff has added maps for 3 more states:

Upcoming deadlines for states with proposed maps: GA, MI, WA
  • MI: Nov. 1, 2021 - Deadline for commission to enact congressional map - 4 commission maps
  • WA: Nov. 15, 2021 - Deadline for commission to enact congressional map - 2 Democratic, 2 Republican map
  • GA: March 7, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 Republican map
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Maine now has a map, a map much like its previous one, with two districts: a leaning-Democratic west half of the coast, and the leaning-Republican rest of the state.

AR, CO, GA, IA, ID, IN, MD, (ME), MI, NE, NY, OH, (OR), TX, WA, WV
  • OH: Sept. 30, 2021 - Deadline for legislature to enact congressional map - 1 Democratic map
  • WV: Jan. 10, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 9 Republican maps
Deadlines coming up for CO and MI.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Nebraska now has a map. It is much like the old one, with a competitive district in Omaha and nearby, a moderately Republican district surrounding it, and a strongly Republican district in the rest of the state: most of it.

Maps at 538: AR, CO, GA, IA, ID, IN, MD, (ME), MI, (NE), NY, OH, (OR), TX, WA, WV
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Indiana now has a map. Like ME and NE, its map is not much different from the previous one.

Maps at 538: AR, CO, GA, IA, ID, (IN), MD, (ME), MI, (NE), NY, OH, (OR), TX, WA, WV

On Sep 28, CO's Supreme Court got the state's proposed new map from the redistricting commission. It is to either approve the map or send it back for fixes by Nov 1, and its final deadline for acceptance is Dec 1.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight

538's dashboard now marks out the states with proposed maps, and its lists of states have a green circle for each state with approved maps, along with a yellow circle for each state with proposed maps. Makes my life a lot easier.

Maps at 538: AR, CO, GA, HI, IA, ID, MD, MT, MI, NY, OH, TX, WA, WV

Hawaii now has 2 proposed maps for its 2 districts. Both maps are much like the original, with two districts, one around the capital, Honolulu, and one for the rest of the state. Given this lack of change, I would not be surprised if this map gets enacted very quickly.

Montana has 9 proposed maps for its now 2 districts, with one district strong R and the other ranging from competitive to strong R.

New Mexico has 8 proposed maps for its 3 districts, ranging from having 2 D-leaning 1 competitive to 1 strong D, 1 D-leaning, 1 strong R.

The NM map is likely to be very contentious.

Updated deadlines:
  • MT: Oct. 21, 2021 - Date that commission will select a tentative final congressional map - 9 commission maps
  • NM: Oct. 30, 2021 - Soft deadline for commission to propose draft of congressional map - 8 commission maps
  • OH: Oct. 31, 2021 - Deadline for backup commission to enact map if legislature doesn't succeed - 1 Democratic map
  • CO: Nov. 1, 2021 - Deadline for state Supreme Court to approve commission's map or send it back for revisions - 5 commission maps
  • MI: Nov. 1, 2021 - Deadline for commission to enact congressional map - 15 commission maps
  • IN: Nov. 15, 2021 - Adjournment date for legislature (which takes first crack at enacting a map) - 1 Republican map
  • WA: Nov. 15, 2021 - Deadline for commission to enact congressional map - 2 Democratic, 2 Republican maps
  • TX: Dec. 13, 2021 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date) - 2 Republican maps
  • NE: Jan. 5, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 Democratic, 1 Republican, 1 compromise map
  • HI: Jan. 8, 2022 - Deadline for commission to propose draft of congressional map - 2 commission maps
  • WV: Jan. 10, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 18 Republican maps
  • NY: Jan. 15, 2022 - Deadline for commission to submit congressional map to legislature - 2 commission (D: "Letters", R: "Names") maps
  • AR: Feb. 22, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 3 Democratic, 7 Republican maps
  • MD: Feb. 22, 2022 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date) - 2 commission map
  • IA: Feb. 28, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 commission map
  • ID: Feb. 28, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 2 commission maps
  • GA: Mar 7, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 1 Republican map
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Arizona has a map. It's a bit easier for the Democrats than the current map, making an area near Phoenix more competitive, though making the southernmost districts less strongly Democratic.

MD now has 2 maps, both with two strong Republican districts. The current map has only one, but it's very gerrymandered.

WV now has 25 maps, differing in how they split the state in two. N-S, NE-SW, E-W, SE-NW.

Maps at 538: AR, AZ, CO, GA, HI, IA, ID, MD, MI, MT, NY, OH, TX, WA, WV
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Utah now has some maps. Its redistricting commission has produced 6 maps for its 4 districts. Like the original map, all these maps contain 3 strong Republican districts. The 4th one ranges from strongly Democratic to strongly Republican, with the existing one leaning Republican. What makes it vary is how much of Salt Lake City that it includes.
  • UT: Nov. 24, 2021 - Deadline for commission to submit three congressional maps to legislature
  • AZ: Jan. 1, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Texas's State Senate has accepted a map that's close to the proposed maps. It seems to me that the map will soon be accepted by the House and the Gov, since the Republican Party has a trifecta there. It also seems like TX's politicians are going for safe seats rather than more but risky seats.

Otherwise, no additional maps.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight
with
Home Page - All About Redistricting

Oregon's map is now being litigated.
Clarno v. Fagan - All About Redistricting
State court challenge by former Secretary of State (Clarno) against current Secretary of State (Fagan) arguing that the state’s congressional redistricting plan violates various provisions of the state constitution (art. I §§ 8, 20, 26, art. II § 1) and a state statute that explicitly provides that “[n]o district shall be drawn for the purpose of favoring any political party, incumbent legislator or other person.” (ORS § 188.010(2)).
Chapter 188 — Congressional and Legislative Districts; Reapportionment - 2019 EDITION
Clarno vs. Fagan plaintiffs' filing
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Illinois and Virginia now have maps.

Now at 538: AR, AZ, CO, GA, HI, IA, ID, IL, MD, MI, MT, NM, NY, OH, TX, UT, VA, WA, WV

Illinois lost a seat, and the proposed map has two fewer Republican-leaning seats and one more competitive seat. Two Democratic incumbents, Lauren Underwood and Marie Newman, will be in vulnerable seats, and the seat of retiring incumbent Cheri Bustos will also be vulnerable.

Virginia has three proposed maps, all with with 5 strong D, one with 3 lean R and 3 strong R, one with 1 competitive, 1 lean R, 4 strong R, and one with 1 competitive, 2 lean R, 3 strong R.

I note a nice user-interface feature that was either recently added or that I did not notice earlier: + and - buttons to magnify and demagnify the map. One can click and drag to move the map in the page.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight Where are we now?

Arizona: Jan. 1, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

The state's redistricting commission now has 4 plans.

Arkansas: Feb. 22, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

The state's legislature has approved a map, and Gov. Asa Hutchinson has decided to let it pass into law without signing it. That event should happen on November 5.

Colorado: Nov. 1, 2021 - Deadline for state Supreme Court to approve commission's map or send it back for revisions

The state's Supreme Court is now considering it.

Georgia: March 7, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

State Senate Republicans have released an initial map.

Hawaii: Jan. 8, 2022 - Deadline for commission to propose draft of congressional map

Two nearly identical maps.

Idaho: Feb. 28, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

Two similar maps.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Republicans Are Passing Rigged Maps and Democrats Are Running Out of Time to Stop It

Extreme gerrymandering in Texas shows the high price of congressional inaction.

Texas’ population is 39.8 percent white, 39.3 percent Hispanic, 11.8 percent Black, and 5.4 percent Asian American. But under the state legislative maps approved on October 15, white people comprise a majority of eligible voters in more than 60 percent of districts on average, while Hispanics are a majority in roughly 20 percent of districts, Black residents a majority in just 3 percent of districts, and Asian Americans a majority in zero districts—far below their overall numbers in the state. The congressional maps approved on October 18 have a similar skew in favor of white representation: white people comprise a majority of eligible voters in 60 percent of districts, while Hispanics are a majority in 18 percent of districts, and Black residents are a majority in zero districts—a stunning level of under-representation for voters of color given that Texas gained nearly two million new Latino residents and more than 550,000 Black residents compared to just 187,000 white residents over the past decade. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has already filed suit against the state, contending the maps violate the Voting Rights Act.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Illinois: March 7, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

Illinois Democrats agonize over how much to gerrymander - POLITICO - "State legislators proposed a map last week. National Democrats thought it didn't go far enough."
Illinois Democrats unveiled a draft congressional map Friday that would bury the GOP: The proposed lines could give them control of 14 of the state’s 17 House seats.

But privately, some national Democrats felt even that didn't go far enough. So late Friday night, they floated an alternative map that was even more aggressive — one that could leave Republicans with just two seats.
The state's delegation is currently D 13 R 5, and the state lost a district in redistricting, going from 18 to 17 districts.

Though Rep. Cheri Bustos is retiring, for convenience, I will talk about her as if she will still have her district. Her district will go from R+5 to D+2, Lauren Underwood's from R+3 to D+2, and Marie Newman's from D+10 to D+3. All three Reps will be vulnerable in a bad year for Democrats.
Democratic Rep. Marie Newman, on the other hand, finds herself in a potentially competitive seat — and she was quick to express her displeasure.

"It is abundantly apparent that what has currently been proposed for Illinois' 3rd Congressional District is not only retrogressive but substantially diminishes the diverse and progressive voices of Chicago's Southwest Side and suburbs," Newman said in a statement.

...
"The map that was released is a massive missed opportunity that will have repercussions for control of the House," said one Democratic strategist involved in Illinois politics. "And I can’t imagine that Democrats in Illinois, who have a reputation for being incredibly well-organized, disciplined and ruthless, would allow this to happen."
MN's new district stretches well into the countryside, and CB's from the northwest into the interior to reach Peoria. A currently-Republican district in the center of the state will be slimmed and rerouted through Champaign, Decatur, Springfield, and East St. Louis. It will become Democratic-leaning, something that will cause trouble for that district's Republican incumbent.

Republicans dismissed this map as gerrymandered.
"Call this new Illinois map the Nancy Pelosi Protection Plan," said state GOP Chairman Don Tracy. "It’s appalling that fair representation, keeping communities of interest together and transparency in the mapmaking process in Illinois all had to take a back seat to the demands of national politics."
A Democratic operative created a more aggressive map, one that would leave Republicans with only two seats.
In this proposal, Bustos' northwest Illinois district stretches across the state's northern border, grabbing the city of Rockford and dipping into Lake County to pick up some of the city of Waukegan. It also loops the Democratic-leaning cities downstate into two districts: one snaking from East St. Louis to Springfield to Decatur, and another that stretches from Peoria to Bloomington to Champaign.
I look at these maps and I think: why doesn't anyone ever think of multimember districts? That would make it easier to ensure that everybody will get some compatible Representative, even if only one of several in a district.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Iowa: Feb. 28, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

The State Senate rejected the first proposed map, one that would have created a Democratic-leaning district.

Maryland: Feb. 22, 2022 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date)

Michigan: Dec. 31, 2021 - Date by which commission says it will enact a map

The redistricting commission has trimmed its proposals down to four maps. "The maps are now open for consideration and comment from the public to help the commission decide on one finalist. On Nov. 5, the commission is set to vote on final maps, which will then be open for a final round of public scrutiny before commissioners are expected to adopt the final maps on Dec. 30."

Montana: Oct. 21, 2021 - Date that commission will select a tentative final congressional map

New Mexico: Oct. 30, 2021 - Soft deadline for commission to propose draft of congressional map

The redistricting commission is down to three maps.

New York: Jan. 15, 2022 - Deadline for commission to submit congressional map to legislature

The redistricting commission could not agree on what maps to submit, so the Democrats composed one map and the Republicans another.

North Carolina: Dec. 6, 2021 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

The state gained a district, and the five proposed maps range from D 2 C 2 R 10 to D 5 C 3 R 6 - the state is currently D 5 R 8

Ohio: Oct. 31, 2021 - Deadline for backup commission to enact map if legislature doesn't succeed

Texas: Dec. 13, 2021 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date)

Both houses of the legislature have agreed on a map, and it is off to Gov. Greg Abbott for his signature.

Utah: Nov. 1, 2021 - Date by which commission says it will submit three congressional maps to legislature

The redistricting commission has proposed six maps.

Virginia: Oct. 25, 2021 - Deadline for commission to submit congressional map to legislature

The redistricting commission has created 7 maps, and its Democratic and Republican members are at loggerheads on which map to submit.

Washington: Nov. 15, 2021 - Deadline for commission to enact congressional map

The redistricting commission has created 4 maps, and its Democratic and Republican members are at loggerheads over what to put in the map. The Democrats want an additional Democratic-leaning seat, while the Republicans want an additional Republican-leaning seat.

West Virginia: Jan. 10, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

The legislature has agreed on a new map, and Gov. Jim Justice is expected to sign it into law.

Wisconsin: April 15, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

The People's Maps Commission has created 3 maps. Since Gov. Tony Evers is a Democrat and since Republicans dominate both houses of the legislature, expect the courts to decide which maps to use.
 

Tigers!

Veteran Member
Illinois: March 7, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

Illinois Democrats agonize over how much to gerrymander - POLITICO - "State legislators proposed a map last week. National Democrats thought it didn't go far enough."

The state's delegation is currently D 13 R 5, and the state lost a district in redistricting, going from 18 to 17 districts.

Though Rep. Cheri Bustos is retiring, for convenience, I will talk about her as if she will still have her district. Her district will go from R+5 to D+2, Lauren Underwood's from R+3 to D+2, and Marie Newman's from D+10 to D+3. All three Reps will be vulnerable in a bad year for Democrats.

MN's new district stretches well into the countryside, and CB's from the northwest into the interior to reach Peoria. A currently-Republican district in the center of the state will be slimmed and rerouted through Champaign, Decatur, Springfield, and East St. Louis. It will become Democratic-leaning, something that will cause trouble for that district's Republican incumbent.

Republicans dismissed this map as gerrymandered.
"Call this new Illinois map the Nancy Pelosi Protection Plan," said state GOP Chairman Don Tracy. "It’s appalling that fair representation, keeping communities of interest together and transparency in the mapmaking process in Illinois all had to take a back seat to the demands of national politics."
A Democratic operative created a more aggressive map, one that would leave Republicans with only two seats.
In this proposal, Bustos' northwest Illinois district stretches across the state's northern border, grabbing the city of Rockford and dipping into Lake County to pick up some of the city of Waukegan. It also loops the Democratic-leaning cities downstate into two districts: one snaking from East St. Louis to Springfield to Decatur, and another that stretches from Peoria to Bloomington to Champaign.
I look at these maps and I think: why doesn't anyone ever think of multimember districts? That would make it easier to ensure that everybody will get some compatible Representative, even if only one of several in a district.

Or create electorates based solely upon numbers, not previous voting patterns?
 

lpetrich

Contributor
West Virginia now has maps for Congress and its state legislature. Its two House districts divide the state roughly north-south.

Georgia Democrats have responded with their own map, which gives Democrats an additional seat, as opposed to the originally-proposed map, which gives Republicans an additional seat.
 

Tigers!

Veteran Member
Or create electorates based solely upon numbers, not previous voting patterns?
What do you mean?

Looking at some of the maps (thank you for the work of linking) it seems to me that some of the maps are designed to maintain the status quo i.e. electorate X returned Demo/Rep/Ind at the last election and we will try to maintain that. Based upon population movements we will make the following adjustments to keep that result.

The mechanics of a voting system are to ensure that a number of voters (The number, N +/- %N, to be as consistent as possible in all electorates) have the opportunity to have their votes cast, counted and acknowledged as fairly and correctly as possible. It is not to maintain or attempt to cause a pre-ordinated outcome.
in post 37 you stated

I look at these maps and I think: why doesn't anyone ever think of multimember districts? That would make it easier to ensure that everybody will get some compatible Representative, even if only one of several in a district.
The attempt to maintain a previous outcome is the worse way to do a voting system.
Any system should not necessarily give voters what they desired rather it gives them the opportunity to vote.
 

Tigers!

Veteran Member
West Virginia now has maps for Congress and its state legislature. Its two House districts divide the state roughly north-south.

Georgia Democrats have responded with their own map, which gives Democrats an additional seat, as opposed to the originally-proposed map, which gives Republicans an additional seat.

Therein lies a problem.
Political parties should not be drawing up electoral maps. That is the role of a an independent body, answerable to only the parliament, house or authority that raised it. Political parties can certainly critique the results and propose amendements but they do not decide. In Australia, I as a citizen, can also critique new electoral boundaries but it is the electoral commission, not i who finally decides.
Political parties will always try to maintain, at the very least, the status quo. That is one of the worse reasons to have an electoral system.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Texas now has a Congressional map. It's very gerrymandered, but Republicans didn't gain much in it. That is because the map was designed for incumbent protection, and to expand the Republicans' reach would have risked the electoral fortunes of several Republican incumbents. It strengthens Republicans in several seats, and it also strengthens Democrats in their seats.

In Illinois, the Democratic-dominated state legislature has released another map, on even more favorable to Democrats than the earlier one. It has a majority-Hispanic district near Chicago, and it shoves Reps. Sean Casten and Marie Newman into the same district.

Iowa now has a second proposed map, with district partisanship R+2, R+4, R+6, R+27.

What Redistricting Looks Like In Every State | FiveThirtyEight
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Americans Don’t Trust Their Congressional Maps To Be Drawn Fairly. Can Anything Change That? | FiveThirtyEight
But Americans aren’t necessarily confident that the process will be a fair one. Just 16 percent of U.S. adults said they thought their states’ congressional maps would be drawn fairly, while 44 percent said they thought the maps would be drawn unfairly, per an August YouGov/Economist poll. Another 40 percent of adults said they were unsure if the maps will be fair. That might be one reason why independent commissions, which aim to empower ordinary citizens to draw map lines, have grown in use since the last redistricting cycle. In that same YouGov/Economist poll, 50 percent of Americans said they thought independent commissions should be responsible for the redistricting process in their state.

However, it’s unclear whether independent commissions will be enough to help build trust in the redistricting process. For some, the redistricting process is simply “the most political activity in American politics,” according to Michael Bitzer, a professor of politics and history at Catawba College and author of “Redistricting and Gerrymandering in North Carolina: Battlelines in the Tar Heel State.”

And Bitzer doesn’t see that changing anytime soon.

...
Redistricting has been a problem in a number of states, to the extent that the court has had to intervene. According to the nonpartisan redistricting website All About Redistricting, the courts rejected all or part of the maps in five states and drew new maps in 12 other states. And there is already one lawsuit pending this year.

...
For instance, a panel of federal judges threw out a partisan gerrymandering case in Wisconsin involving the state’s 2011 map following the Supreme Court’s 2019 decision, leaving that map in place. Wisconsin is now, of course, redrawing its map, but given that the government is divided — the governor is a Democrat, but Republicans control the state legislature — and there are already two lawsuits over the redistricting process, it’s possible that the courts will need to draw the lines if Democrats and Republicans can’t agree on a map.

It’s why in some states, voters are trying to address redistricting themselves in the form of independent redistricting commissions.
That article contains absolutely zero mention of the best solution IMO: proportional representation. The big problem here is disproportion, especially deliberate disproportion to favor one side or the other -- gerrymandering. PR is a very good cure for it, and it can also encourage alternatives to the D-R duopoly.

Many nations already use PR, so we can see how well it works in them.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
From that 538 article:
ControlStatesDistricts
Republican20187
Democratic775
Split971
Independent commission896
One district66
(Total)50435
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Alabama: Jan. 28, 2022 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date) - Redistricting committee proposes a map.

Arizona: Jan. 1, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - Redistricting commission has preliminary approval of a map that would make 5 R's, 2 C's, and 2 D's.

Georgia: March 7, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - two maps, one proposed by Republicans and one by Democrats.

Illinois: March 7, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - the IL House and Senate have approved a map. Marie Newman decided to challenge Sean Casten rather than Chuy Garcia. R's Mike Bost and Mary Miller are now in the same S IL district, and the Springfield Strip, now somewhat D, is now an open seat.

Iowa: Feb. 28, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - now on its second map, with 2 R seats and 2 C seats.

Michigan: Dec. 31, 2021 - Date by which commission says it will enact a map - the redistricting commission has proposed 22 maps, and it is now down to 4.

New Mexico: Feb. 1, 2022 - Deadline for congressional candidates to file (therefore map should be set by this date) - one map is now a top pick, with 2 weak D and 1 C district.

North Carolina: Dec. 6, 2021 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date) - 10 maps so far.

Virginia: Oct. 25, 2021 - Deadline for commission to submit congressional map to legislature - Nov. 9, 2021 - Deadline for legislature to approve or reject congressional map - Nov. 23, 2021 - Deadline for commission to submit new map to legislature if initial map is rejected - Nov. 30, 2021 - Deadline for legislature to approve or reject new map if initial map is rejected - 7 maps so far, with the D and the R members of the redistricting commission at loggerheads.


C = competitive
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Colorado now has a map. Joe Neguse got CO-02, a district extending NNW from Denver and D+32, and Lauren Boebert got CO-03, in the western and southern part of the state, and R+15. The state's new districts have partisan leanings much like its old districts, except for the district it gained, which is R+3.
  • Old: +47 +23 +15 +12 -12 -21 -22
  • New: +55 +32 +16 +6 -3 -15 -18 -26
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Arkansas now has a map, though by the state's governor letting it become law instead of him signing the bill for it.

Iowa's legislaure has approved that second map.

Massachusetts: Feb. 15, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

The state's redistricting committee proposes a map for the state's 9 districts that is not much different from its present map. All of them are solidly Democratic, the weakest district being in Cape Cod, in the southeast part of the state, ad D+17. That suggests that disproportion can be due to lack of concentration, and the appropriate fix for that is proportional representation.

Montana: Nov. 14, 2021 - Deadline for commission to enact congressional map

The state's redistricting commission is down to two maps, both with a weakly Republican western strip and with a strongly Republican rest of the state.

Ohio: Nov. 30, 2021 - Deadline for legislature to pass temporary map if commission doesn't succeed

Now it's up to state legislators to decide on a map.

Oklahoma: April 13, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

Five strongly-Republican districts, with one district made more Republican by moving it northward and out of some of Oklahoma City.

Wisconsin: April 15, 2022 - Date that candidates begin filing for congressional runs (therefore map should be set by this date)

There's another issue. To quote 538:
There are no versions of the map that put Democrats on an equal footing to Republicans in purple Wisconsin, and that is in large part thanks to geography. Democrats are highly concentrated in Dane and Milwaukee counties, while Republicans aren’t as highly concentrated in any one part of the rest of the state. It simply would be very difficult to make Democrats competitive in an equal number of seats to Republicans without drawing funkier lines and breaking up municipalities, which the commission was directed not to do.
Proportional representation would fix this problem without drawing any weirdly-shaped districts.
 

Loren Pechtel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Had a thought on a simple fix for gerrymandering:

Every political party with at least one seat submits a proposed map. The map with the lowest total boundary distance wins. Secret "bids".
 
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