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What are you reading?

Politesse

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My partner and I have been reading aloud in the evenings from Proclus, the great Neoplatonic philosopher. It's been pretty interesting! I'm much more tolerant of mysticism than the editor of the volume.

In the mornings, I start out with a few poems from Mendelsohns' new translation of C.P. Cavafy's ouvre. An old favorite poet, but I have been enjoying the new take on the language.

My afternoon book, when I can find time for it, has been Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adachi. A somewhat challenging but interesting read.

I'm also part of a faculty reading group that is working through James Baldwin's work, especially focusing on The Fire Next Time.
 

rousseau

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To continue the trend I've been on I followed Amazon's lead and ordered Leonard Cohen on Leonard Cohen, which is a compilation of interviews he's done throughout his life. Originally I was going to jump around, but now am going to go in sequence. So far I've only read part of the first interview, when he was a young, cocky, thirty year old. Quite funny.

And with baby I've decided to take a new approach with books, rather than predominantly one at a time, I've taken a set of about 10, put them in my study, and am going to pick through them all periodically with no real time horizon. Lately there's no real ability to sit down and read for a few hours, so I just pick the one up I'm interested in and read a bit of it when I can. So a few I'm slowly reading now:

- The Fifth Discipline - A classic business book released in the 80s about organizational learning. Surprisingly good so far, my expectations for business books are very low.
- Death of a Lady's Man - Already back to this poetry of Cohen's, I'd like to really take my time with it
- The Sociological Imagination - A classic of sociology I picked up at our local used shop
- Essays in Zen Buddhism, First Series (D.T. Suzuki) - Skimming through this as I've already read so much by the same author
- How to Talk so Kids Will Listen, and Listen so Kids Will Talk - I bought this a long time ago and am dreading it. These books pander to clueless parents and are quite boring, and this one is thick. But I'm determined to check it out.
- Collected Poems by Federico Lorca - Cohen's original inspiration. I'm going to really take my time with this one and not rush through it.
- The Flame by Leonard Cohen - The last release around Cohen's time of death. I bought it a long time ago and oddly never went through it. Regretting that now with our lack of time.

There are a couple others, but books I've already mentioned in-thread and not finished yet.
 

James Brown

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I have to disagree with your opinion of How To Talk so Kids Will Listen, and Listen so Kids Will Talk. First, it's filled with explanatory illustrations such that you can get the gist of the ideas in only a few minutes. Second, I found it to be insightful. I changed my method of talking with my son based on this book, and more than once I found myself saying, "I wish my parents had talked to me this way."

I've worked in retail for two decades and have seen a lot of parental interactions with their kids. I am quite convinced that if some people talked with their friends the way they talk with their children, then they wouldn't have any friends.
 

rousseau

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I have to disagree with your opinion of How To Talk so Kids Will Listen, and Listen so Kids Will Talk. First, it's filled with explanatory illustrations such that you can get the gist of the ideas in only a few minutes. Second, I found it to be insightful. I changed my method of talking with my son based on this book, and more than once I found myself saying, "I wish my parents had talked to me this way."

I've worked in retail for two decades and have seen a lot of parental interactions with their kids. I am quite convinced that if some people talked with their friends the way they talk with their children, then they wouldn't have any friends.

To be fair I haven't started it yet. But the issue I have with many parenting books isn't that they're bad books, but instead that they're too text-heavy for the substance they offer. Those I've read so far usually make you work pretty hard just to pick up a few new concepts, which could be outlined in a long-form article. You see the same problem in business books - authors latch on to a handful of very good ideas that are valuable, but not that complicated, then they write hundreds of pages of unneeded text.

I really shouldn't knock this particular title before I've even opened it, but my expectations from the last few haven't been set very high. I know I'll gain from it, but I'm expecting a few useful paragraphs, then skimming through pages and pages of examples.
 

rousseau

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In the mornings, I start out with a few poems from Mendelsohns' new translation of C.P. Cavafy's ouvre. An old favorite poet, but I have been enjoying the new take on the language.

Is there a translation you'd recommend? I own a copy of his collected poems, this one translated by Edmund Keeley, but it was mostly by force as I found the copy at one of our local, used bookshops.

It's reviews seem to be pretty good.
 

Politesse

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Is there a translation you'd recommend? I own a copy of his collected poems, this one translated by Edmund Keeley, but it was mostly by force as I found the copy at one of our local, used bookshops.

Well, as I said, I've really been enjoying the one I'm going through now, by Daniel Mendelsohn. I also highly recommend this excellent interview with the translator, if you are a Cavafy.fan. The Keeley collection was the one I discovered his work through. I find Mendelsohn's version to be a bit more straightforward and minimalist, which suits the mournful character of Cavafy's Greek as I understand it.

This is reminding me that you started a nice thread on poetry while I was doing spring semester planning, and I never got round to hunting it down again.
 

rousseau

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Is there a translation you'd recommend? I own a copy of his collected poems, this one translated by Edmund Keeley, but it was mostly by force as I found the copy at one of our local, used bookshops.

Well, as I said, I've really been enjoying the one I'm going through now, by Daniel Mendelsohn. I also highly recommend this excellent interview with the translator, if you are a Cavafy.fan. The Keeley collection was the one I discovered his work through. I find Mendelsohn's version to be a bit more straightforward and minimalist, which suits the mournful character of Cavafy's Greek as I understand it.

This is reminding me that you started a nice thread on poetry while I was doing spring semester planning, and I never got round to hunting it down again.

I just did a bit of rooting around and as far as I can tell Mendelsohn might be the gold standard. I should look into a copy, and maybe finally finish Keeley's version too?
 

Politesse

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Is there a translation you'd recommend? I own a copy of his collected poems, this one translated by Edmund Keeley, but it was mostly by force as I found the copy at one of our local, used bookshops.

Well, as I said, I've really been enjoying the one I'm going through now, by Daniel Mendelsohn. I also highly recommend this excellent interview with the translator, if you are a Cavafy.fan. The Keeley collection was the one I discovered his work through. I find Mendelsohn's version to be a bit more straightforward and minimalist, which suits the mournful character of Cavafy's Greek as I understand it.

This is reminding me that you started a nice thread on poetry while I was doing spring semester planning, and I never got round to hunting it down again.

I just did a bit of rooting around and as far as I can tell Mendelsohn might be the gold standard. I should look into a copy, and maybe finally finish Keeley's version too?

I mean, can you have too many? :D
 

rousseau

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I just did a bit of rooting around and as far as I can tell Mendelsohn might be the gold standard. I should look into a copy, and maybe finally finish Keeley's version too?

I mean, can you have too many? :D

With the difficulty I have finding new stuff I like, might as well have two copies of Cavafy. That poetry discussion thread is so open for recommendations.
 

rousseau

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I forgot to mention in the last post that I'm also reading The Favourite Game by Leonard Cohen, his first novel. Here is the review I left of it on Goodreads:

Leonard Cohen's first novel. I've put off reading it because even as an ardent Cohen fan I imagined that I would find a semi-biographical novel written by a twenty-something a bit of a slog. Cohen himself stated that it's not meant to be a biography, but it's pretty close to it. Having just read his actual biography titled 'I'm Your Man', there is pretty high consistency between this book and the early years of his life. Although there is definitely an artistic and obscuring element.

On the whole it's pretty much what you'd expect - another young man over-estimating how interested people are about the early years of his life. To Cohen's credit he was a very good writer, even then, but it's clear to see that much of the wisdom he'd pick up throughout his life just wasn't there yet. That makes this an interesting read for the most serious Cohen fan, but likely something that can by passed by if you're just looking for interesting literature.

I also skimmed through How to Talk so Kids Will Listen and it was pretty much as predicted. Definitely valuable for some parents, but I didn't find it super helpful. There was one chapter I liked a lot, though, on not limiting your kids self-perception. That's something I'd not read anywhere else or really thought about.
 

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Death of a Lady's Man (1978) - Hard to describe, but absolutely phenomenal writing

I went through the above quickly, as I was going through the rest of Cohen's catalogue that I hadn't read before. Going through it again now, slowly and carefully, and I have to say it's a cool book. If you're at all into poetry it's worth owning.
 

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Louie Louie by Dave Marsh. All about the song that is Exhibit A of early 60s garage band rock. Overwritten to an extreme, but that's the fun of it -- it's like what you'd get if someone wrote an intellectualized appreciation of Fizzies or 3-D horror movies.
 

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I finally read a bit of Federico Garcia Lorca's Collected Poems last night (Lorca being the original poet to inspire Cohen). It's a massive book and I've just scratched the surface so can't generalize, but it's surprisingly enjoyable so far. Very sensuous writing, as you'd expect from someone who lived in Southern Europe.

I also ordered a book last night containing both the Duino Elegies and The Sonnets to Orpheus by Rainer Maria Rilke, his two final and most famous works. Translated by Stephen Mitchell.

For quite some time I was buying all of my poetry at local shops in town, when it finally dawned on me that everything decent in their poetry sections was being picked clean pretty quickly. So I've turned to Amazon, and not looked back.
 

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I am now reading War and Peace, finally.
 

ideologyhunter

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Good luck with War and Peace -- and did you know, Tolstoy's original title was War, What Is It Good For? I read it back in 8th grade, which would make it 1968. Good God. I'm sure I missed a lot of the book's deeper points on character, on society, on war, etc. I own a nice copy of the Louise and Aylmer Maude translation, and it is on my bucket list. (I've never read Anna Karenina, and really need to.) Curious: do you have a goal of so many pages to read, per day? With a book that long (the Maude version runs 1351 pages) I never get done unless I hit a certain quota every day.
I'm now reading a MacKinlay Kantor novel from 1936 with an absolutely dipshit title: Arouse and Beware. But the book is good. It's historical fiction, a compact account of two soldiers who have escaped from a hellhole Confederate prison and are trying to get to the north. It was filmed in 1940 as 'The Man from Dakota', which TCM will air on Wed. the 19th, so I want to have it read by then.
 

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Curious: do you have a goal of so many pages to read, per day? With a book that long (the Maude version runs 1351 pages) I never get done unless I hit a certain quota every day.
I do not have a goal of X pages a day. I read constantly and compulsively enough that it's not difficult for me to get through a lot of pages. The slightly difficult thing, for me, is to keep the compulsive reading focused on one book rather than scattered between many books, which slows things down and leads to a risk of getting derailed from one book to another. (When reading for recreation like this that's not a big deal, of course.)
 

spikepipsqueak

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One of my current books Is Hillary Clinton's Living History about their White House years. I read the book, glance up at the telly where Trump is being himself, then back to the book, shaking my head and wondering what on earth could have happened there.
 

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Finishing up Nabokov's Lolita. Strange to think I never got around to reading it before now. Good read, immersive, beautiful writing style, unconventional love story; enjoying it thoroughly.
 

braces_for_impact

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Fiction: I've just started is Children of Ruin by Adrian Tchaikovsky after reading Children of Time.


Non-Fiction I'm starting to go through The Mind illuminated as I go through my meditation journey.
 

4321lynx

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Finishing up Nabokov's Lolita. Strange to think I never got around to reading it before now. Good read, immersive, beautiful writing style, unconventional love story; enjoying it thoroughly.

It is, for all that, a pedophile's view of life. And that does not mean that I think Nabokov was a practising pedophile.
 

atrib

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Finishing up Nabokov's Lolita. Strange to think I never got around to reading it before now. Good read, immersive, beautiful writing style, unconventional love story; enjoying it thoroughly.

It is, for all that, a pedophile's view of life.


It is Humbert's view of life, not necessarily Nabokov's. But the way Nabokov handles the story and the characters, it never came across as repulsive to me, it never made me feel squeamish and wanting to put the book down.
 

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It is Humbert's view of life, not necessarily Nabokov's. But the way Nabokov handles the story and the characters, it never came across as repulsive to me, it never made me feel squeamish and wanting to put the book down.

Never read it. But I remember some reviewer, when it first came out, saying that some of his friends liked it, and they didn't even own a pornograph.
 

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So, sometimes you just get to the point of needing to start reading when you can't wait for the next season of a show. So I'm reading the fifth book in the Expanse series. And let me tell you something, I was shocked at how simply written it is. I was expecting Tom Clancy and got Richard P Henrick. The show provides characters with more nuance and stuff below the surface, the book just kind of blurts it all out. It is definitely a good read so far, but it is much more of a simplistic storytelling than I had expected.
 

bilby

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So, sometimes you just get to the point of needing to start reading when you can't wait for the next season of a show. So I'm reading the fifth book in the Expanse series. And let me tell you something, I was shocked at how simply written it is. I was expecting Tom Clancy and got Richard P Henrick. The show provides characters with more nuance and stuff below the surface, the book just kind of blurts it all out. It is definitely a good read so far, but it is much more of a simplistic storytelling than I had expected.

Did you start with book five, or have you read the entire series?

I find that in a lot of book series, the later volumes tend to start with a quick character sketch for the main cast as they pop up, presumably for readers who have had long enough between books to forget, and for people who are starting somewhere other than book one. This tends to make the first few chapters of each sequel a little bit simplistic, as it broad-brushes stuff that was more subtly dealt with in the previous novels.

I haven't seen any of the TV show, so I don't know how closely it maps to the books; But IMO the books are excellent.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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Just a PS, I liked Richard P Henrick... though technically only read two of his books. His books were much faster reads than Clancy. Of course, Clancy told a much larger story. I haven't been able to read Clancy since 9/11. I was lucky enough, however, to have started reading more of Clancy after Executive Orders was published, so I shot right through that trilogy one right after the other. I can't imagine finishing Debt of Honor and having to wait!
So, sometimes you just get to the point of needing to start reading when you can't wait for the next season of a show. So I'm reading the fifth book in the Expanse series. And let me tell you something, I was shocked at how simply written it is. I was expecting Tom Clancy and got Richard P Henrick. The show provides characters with more nuance and stuff below the surface, the book just kind of blurts it all out. It is definitely a good read so far, but it is much more of a simplistic storytelling than I had expected.

Did you start with book five, or have you read the entire series?

I find that in a lot of book series, the later volumes tend to start with a quick character sketch for the main cast as they pop up, presumably for readers who have had long enough between books to forget, and for people who are starting somewhere other than book one. This tends to make the first few chapters of each sequel a little bit simplistic, as it broad-brushes stuff that was more subtly dealt with in the previous novels.

I haven't seen any of the TV show, so I don't know how closely it maps to the books; But IMO the books are excellent.
Started with Book Five, so that probably explains that.
 

ideologyhunter

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Vonnegut by the Dozen, a short zippy collection of opinion pieces (and whimsies) that Kurt Vonnegut contributed to The Nation between '78 and '98. I should add, I never acquired a taste for Vonnegut's fiction, but as an essayist, he's quick and provocative. The book was rather hard to find, as it came out under The Nation's imprint, and probably didn't get any exposure in brick & mortar stores. Best piece, so far: his appreciation of Mark Twain.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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Finished Nemesis Games. Definitely interesting. I plot the screenplays and ponder how they’ll could transition into episodes.


I definitely want see an entire episode around Naomi that picks up after she leaps from the Pella and finishes with her being grabbed turning around and smiling. This would be a great time to have flashbacks going over her past.



I still feel odd about the pacing and the ease of the read.


When the rocks fall, Clancy could have written a chapter about a guy sitting at the watch post right before during and after the rocks come down. I know the story is around the main characters, but I just feel there is more there.



I shouldn’t complain. I can read these books quickly. It’d take much longer to get though a thicker narrative. I feel stupid complaining about it. Like I said before, I think the show oddly elevates the novels. Fills in gaps.

We’ll see, I guess. There is a decent amount of gap filling to make this turn into a season’s worth of shows.
 

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The Revolt of Modern Youth (1925) by Judge Ben B. Lindsey with Wainwright Evans

My kind of book: antique (my copy is the 1926 second printing) and once controversial. Lindsey was a juvenile court judge in Denver, loaded with stories about flappers and their fellows getting in trouble. Most of the stories concern unplanned pregnancy.
But Lindsey is out to critique American society. He was a progressive, in favor of the economic independence of women, birth control, trial marriage, no-fault divorce, and ending the stigma of illegitimacy. He wants to reform the American diet, which he calls 'a dietetic horror'. He is for eugenics, and these passages are dated and sensationalistic.
Because the copyright is 1925, there are some howlers: "...of all the youth who go to parties, attend dances, and ride together in automobiles, more than 90 per cent indulge in hugging and kissing." (p.56)
Yet, he is always on the side of youth. Here's my favorite passage:
"That the Youth of today makes mistakes disturbs me somewhat but not excessively. That it is honest heartens and delights me much. Here it comes, with its automobiles, its telephones, its folly and its fun, and its open and unashamed refusal to bow down to a lot of idols made of mud; and it makes me hope." (p. 288)
 

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Trying to get through The Duino Elegies by Rilke lately. I started them a few weeks ago and re-started them this past weekend, but with a four month old and poetry of my own to write, it's hard to get the time/energy.

My wife and I also stopped at The Goodwill Bookstore yesterday (an actual decent, second-hand bookstore) and I picked up a book on Edmund Spenser (a pre-Shakespearean poet), an early Selected Poems of Irving Layton, and The Divine Comedy by Dante.

Once I finally send my own poetry book to press I'm intending on diving into more of the poetry I own, more often. Buy more too. I have no idea what I'm going to be writing next, so am going to seek out some inspiration.
 

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The Expanse - Babylon’s Ashes (not done yet)

I just love how this guy knows where he is going. The character universe is reexpanding, showing he knew he had plans for these folks from earlier on for down the road.
 

bilby

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The Expanse - Babylon’s Ashes (not done yet)

I just love how this guy knows where he is going. The character universe is reexpanding, showing he knew he had plans for these folks from earlier on for down the road.

I am greatly impressed by The Expanse. I understand that there's now a TV series, which is critically acclaimed; But I am a little wary of any adaptation of beloved literature.

Fortunately I understand the TV show is only available here via streaming services, to which I don't subscribe (nor plan to, due to age-onset luddism), which saves me from having to make a decision whether or not to give it a try.
 

rousseau

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Trying to get through The Duino Elegies by Rilke lately. I started them a few weeks ago and re-started them this past weekend, but with a four month old and poetry of my own to write, it's hard to get the time/energy.

My wife and I also stopped at The Goodwill Bookstore yesterday (an actual decent, second-hand bookstore) and I picked up a book on Edmund Spenser (a pre-Shakespearean poet), an early Selected Poems of Irving Layton, and The Divine Comedy by Dante.

Once I finally send my own poetry book to press I'm intending on diving into more of the poetry I own, more often. Buy more too. I have no idea what I'm going to be writing next, so am going to seek out some inspiration.

Oh, and recently I also picked up Poems New and Collected by Wisława Szymborska, a Polish Nobel Prize winner, thanks to a Goodreads recommendation. I've been enjoying it quite a bit. I also picked up the Collected Poems of Anne Sexton from a local, not enjoying it as much but I'm not deep into it yet.

And also I Am That by Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, who followed Advaita Hinduism. Very good, if not a bit repetitive.
 

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The Expanse - Babylon’s Ashes (not done yet)

I just love how this guy knows where he is going. The character universe is reexpanding, showing he knew he had plans for these folks from earlier on for down the road.

I am greatly impressed by The Expanse. I understand that there's now a TV series, which is critically acclaimed; But I am a little wary of any adaptation of beloved literature.

Fortunately I understand the TV show is only available here via streaming services, to which I don't subscribe (nor plan to, due to age-onset luddism), which saves me from having to make a decision whether or not to give it a try.
I picked up where the show left off, so I haven't read the first four books, but in general, I'm getting a more nuanced feel in the show than the books, and the science is presented very well visually. The Expanse to me is atop the pedestal with Babylon 5 for best Sci-Fi/Space Opera/Fantasy ever on TV. This isn't a matter of stuffing a large novel in to 2.5 hours of a movie, but letting a moderate sized novel spill out into a 10 episode (~10 hr) season.
 

rousseau

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I started a few new poetry books mentioned above, but in practice I seem to be finishing Leonard Cohen's Book of Longing for a third time. It's reading a lot better after going through his biography a few months ago. Every night at about 9:30 I sit down and carefully read 4 or 5 more of it's poems.
 

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The Ethical Slut

Anybody who wishes to embark into open relationships should read this. I wish I'd read it when I was young. It would have saved me a lot of grief. Not to mention cut down on number of pointless arguments.

It's just practical tips. The whole book. Very down to earth and meaty. No babble or page fillers. Even the section of how to be a good lover is amazing. Great tips for anybody starting out on a journey of your own sexual exploration. Stuff any woman should know, like how do you help your male lover to get a hardon again after he's lost it. I'm sure this is something every straight woman would love to learn at some point in her life.

It isn't trying to evangelise the lifestyle, and has plenty of sections helpful to anybody in any kind of relationship. Fundamentally it's about how to be a decent person in a relationship without compromising what is important to you. While more important in an open relationship, applies equally to a monogamous relationship.

I've been in open relationships my entire adult life. I've never had a normal monogamous relationship. I'm now 45 years old. Even I learned plenty from this book. The section about jealousy and how to deal with it is great. Applicable to anybody who has ever felt jealous.

I had a sad realization after reading this book. This is extremely low hanging fruit. This is stuff we should all have been taught in school in sex ed. The lies about relationship we've been fed by our Christian heritage is pure poison. Soul killing poison. No wonder so many women don't experience their first orgasm until they're 40+. They don't know their own bodies well enough to teach their male lovers how to push them over the edge. So they have no clue. And everybody is perpetuating a cycle of godawful sex and we're being fed the idiotic lie that people who aren't sluts are virtuous somehow. Even still today 2020. It's bizarre.

It's a book for anyone really. I highly recommend it.
 

spikepipsqueak

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Kicking myself.

Malafrena by Ursula le Guin has been on my bookshelves for about 40 years and I've never taken it down until 3 days ago. Even though I remember loving The Dispossessed. (I am a) Dickwit.


In other news, I have reverted to childhood and am revisiting Anne McCaffrey's Pern series, which is a lovely relaxing read.

Also. Finally scraped together the readies to get myself the Aubrey/Maturin series. Just arrived :joy::D :joy:
 

Jimmy Higgins

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Finished Book 6 of The Expanse series. So apparently these are written in trilogies. So Book 6 ends the second trilogy which was bigger and better than the first, and the first was pretty good. I felt the resolution at the end felt a little anti-climatic or unsatisfying but not because the author was cheating. Corey plants things well in advance and plucks them from the ground later on.

Onto Book Seven.
 

DBT

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Faith is a form of self deception.
Started 'The Wandering Jew' by Eugene Sue...all 1450 pages of it. I'm not sure how this will go.
 

rousseau

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Picked up a few more books from a local bookstore recently..

London: 150 Cultural Moments which is a local cultural history of London put together by Vanessa Brown and Jason Dickson, owners of said bookstore. The pair are very smart / witty, which is making it a fun read.

Fresh Air Fiend by Paul Theroux. For those not familiar he's an incredible travel writer, this is a collection of travel essays which I plan to stretch out for some time.

French Symbolist Poetry. On the recommendation of Tharmas I found a small collection for 5 dollars.

The Energy of Slaves by Cohen. Not so much reading it, but found a first edition of this at the aforementioned bookstore. It's one of my favourites by Cohen, so I picked it up.

The Grand Old Lady by Vanessa Brown. This was the first book she wrote on a hotel that existed in London from the 20s to 70s. Only 500 copies were printed, and I've wanted to read it for a few years. Finally I discovered that it's carried by our local libraries, so I picked it up two nights ago.
 

ideologyhunter

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Gratitude by Oliver Sacks, a short-short book (45 pages) which collects four essays Sacks wrote just before and after learning he had terminal cancer of the liver. Compact and beautiful writing -- I read it in an hour but will be thinking about it for a long while.
 

ideologyhunter

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A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys(1851) by Nathaniel Hawthorne, is Hawthorne's retelling of six ancient myths. I knew vaguely of this book, but had never read a review. It's marvelous; Hawthorne adapted his tone and persona to children's literature as if it was his standard mode. I enjoyed each tale, especially the one about Medusa. Sure wish I'd read this, or had it read to me, at about age 10. Now I will have to read the follow-up, Tanglewood Tales.
 

rousseau

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History of the Italian People by Giuliano Procacci. Originally written in Italian, it's a history of Italy that I conveniently purchased some time ago and hadn't gone through yet. It goes back to 1000 AD and the first few chapters covering that early era make for an interesting read. After reading tons of European history already none of it is too eye-opening, but it's fun getting the Italian perspective.

I've also been casually browsing my own collection from time to time lately - there doesn't seem to be much that I'm too interested in, but I can at least pull stuff off the shelves and flip through it a bit.
 

rousseau

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I had the day off due to Remembrance day and checked out my two favourite locals. At the hippie shop I pillaged a new collection of poetry they just acquired, picked up a book by Phil Hall, Kathryn Mockler, and Denise Levertov. At the learned man sipping Scotch shop I did my usual check of the Africa and Sociology sections - happily walked away with Africa in History by Basil Davidson, which I've been going through tonight.
 

spikepipsqueak

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Finished Book 6 of The Expanse series. So apparently these are written in trilogies. So Book 6 ends the second trilogy which was bigger and better than the first, and the first was pretty good. I felt the resolution at the end felt a little anti-climatic or unsatisfying but not because the author was cheating. Corey plants things well in advance and plucks them from the ground later on.

Onto Book Seven.

People were discussing this series here and I wanted to give it a try. The sixth was the only one available. Sometimes you can read series out of order.

Not this one.

But I got a sense of how good it is and will persevere in getting the first, so thanks.


I am constantly surprised and amused by the way the books I am independently reading seem connected.

Dark Emu, Bruce Pascoe. Examining pre-colonisation modes of indigenous life.

And

World Engines. Destroyer. Stephen Baxter. Which coincidentally bases its society on much the same ethos.

Loving both.
 

James Brown

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I've just finished reading Book One of the Expanse (Leviathan Wakes) and loved it. I'm working through the first season of the show now and am very impressed with the production value.

Anyone care to explain something to me? Spoilers...


So there's Julie Mao. Rich daughter of an industrialist on Luna, who throws it all away to sign up on with the OPA.

Then the Scopuli is boarded by Protogen and set as bait for anyone to come along, get blown up, with the blame pointing to Mars. But this seems like a very long shot. All that's indicating Mars is involved is a single Martian comm device sending a bogus distress beacon. What if whoever came along for the rescue didn't notice the Martian markings? Or what if the first rescue ship was Martian?

Also, is it significant that Julie Mao is on the Scopuli, or just happenstance?

I can't quite follow the events. Protogen boards the Scopuli, captures the crew, tosses Julie in a locker, then infects the crew with the virus--then simply leaves? Julie breaks out of the locker, sees her crewmates infected--and then somehow gets to Eros? Where she dies from the virus in a hotel bathroom?


 
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