• Welcome to the new Internet Infidels Discussion Board, formerly Talk Freethought.

On Deck: 2022

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
2022 Special Elections and how they turned out for the Republican Party. I've used Ballotpedia's numbers and 538's partisanship estimates for the districts, and I note that all these elections were after the Supreme Court's revoking of Roe vs. Wade.

DistrictDateD-R(538)Diff
NE-01Jun 28-5.4-17+12
MN-01Aug 9-4.2-14+10
NY-19Aug 23+2.3-1+3
NY-23Aug 23-6.5-23+16
AK-01Aug 16+3.0-15+18

538 is now rating both the House and the Senate as toss-ups, with plenty of scatter in both directions for the two chambers -- 538 uses a "Monte Carlo" simulation model, with repeated runs with random numbers, and the site displays some of its simulation results in its diagrams.

Democrats Sense a Shift in the Political Winds, but It May Not Be Enough - The New York Times - abortion and Trump as liabilities for the Republican Party. Enough to overcome Republican gerrymandering?

Trump and Abortion Shift Narrative for Midterm Elections - The New York Times - "The G.O.P. is still favored in the fall House races, but Trump and abortion are scrambling the picture in ways that distress Republican insiders."
One day, it might be Mitch McConnell, the top Republican in the Senate, complaining about the “quality” of his party’s candidates while his deputies point fingers at Senator Rick Scott of Florida, who runs the G.O.P.’s Senate campaign arm.

Another day, it might be Donald Trump calling for McConnell’s ouster and giving McConnell’s wife, Elaine Chao, bizarre nicknames like “Coco.”

On days that end in “y,” you might find Republicans on television complaining about Trump’s hold over the party ...
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Opinion | Women Are So Fired Up to Vote, I’ve Never Seen Anything Like It - The New York Times
I’ve watched Americans in recent years acclimate to some very grim realities. Especially since the ascension of Donald Trump, numerous tragedies and extreme policies have been met with little political consequence: schools targeted by mass murderers, immigrants treated as subhuman and autocratic regimes around the globe affirmed as allies. While Mr. Trump did fail in his re-election bid, a swing of just over 20,000 votes in the three states with the narrowest margins would have produced a win for him, and Democrats hold razor-thin majorities in the House and the Senate.
But then the Supreme Court gave a big part of the Republican base what it wanted.

Author Tom Bonier then looked at who was registering to vote in Kansas before that referendum.
Sixty-nine percent of those new registrants were women. In the six months before Dobbs, women outnumbered men by a three-point margin among new voter registrations. After Dobbs, that gender gap skyrocketed to 40 points. Women were engaged politically in a way that lacked any known precedent.

Repeating the Kansas analysis across several other states, a clear pattern emerged. Nowhere were the results as stark as they were there, but no other state was facing the issue with the immediacy of an August vote on a constitutional amendment. What my team and I did find was large surges in women registering to vote relative to men, when comparing the period before June 24 and after.

The pattern was clearest in states where abortion access was most at risk, and where the electoral stakes for abortion rights this November were the highest. The states with the biggest surges in women registering post-Dobbs were deep red Kansas and Idaho, with Louisiana emerging among the top five states. Key battleground states also showed large increases, including Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin and Ohio, which are all facing statewide races in which the fate of abortion access could be decided in November.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Peter Thiel rebuffs Mitch McConnell over Senate rescue in Arizona - The Washington Post - "The Senate minority leader and the billionaire venture capitalist each say the other should be subsidizing Blake Masters in the final months of his campaign"
After J.D. Vance won the Republican primary for Senate in Ohio, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) called Peter Thiel, the billionaire investor who had pumped $15 million into a super PAC backing Vance, to congratulate him but also to make a request: Since McConnell’s resources were limited, the senator said, would Thiel continue to finance Vance through the general election?

Thiel demurred, according to a person familiar with the May exchange who, like others interviewed for this article, spoke on the condition of anonymity to describe private discussions.
Then mentioning other conversations between PT and MMC.
They also illustrate McConnell’s vexed relationship with candidates elevated by former president Donald Trump and donors, such as Thiel, sympathetic to Trump’s worldview.
Great fun to watch this squabble.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
Messages
32,023
Location
Frozen in Michigan
Gender
Old Fart
Basic Beliefs
Democratic Socialist Atheist
What happened to the Republicans' campaign money? Senator Rick Scott is in charge of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, but under his leadership, the money became depleted so fast that the NRSC has had to cut back on its ads. But this Senator has a history that does not reflect very well on him.

Rick Scott's Fraud Settlement Resurfaces as Senate GOP Runs Low on Cash
Critics of Senator Rick Scott, a Florida Republican who chairs the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC), resurfaced a past Medicare fraud settlement from his tenure as CEO of a hospital corporation, as his committee reportedly is running short on cash and pulling ads in support of GOP Senate candidates with less than three months until the midterm election.

The NRSC is the primary organization working to raise funds and support Republican candidates in the party's bid to take back the majority in the upper chamber of Congress. Scott has led the committee since January 2021, but The Washington Post reported on Friday that campaign advisers are asking "where all the money went and to demand an audit of the committee's finances" as the NRSC pulls ads and runs low on funds.

Many on Twitter pointed to Scott's past Medicare fraud scandal during his time as CEO of Columbia/HCA. When Scott was deposed in 2000 amid the investigation, he pleaded the Fifth Amendment 75 times.

Columbia/HCA later reached a settlement with the Justice Department of $840 million in 2000, and another settlement of $881 million in 2002, with the combined fines totaling $1.7 billion. At the time, this was the record health care fraud settlement, although it has since been surpassed, according to PolitiFact.
noting
Gary Legum on Twitter: "Rick Scott oversaw the biggest Medicare fraud in history, so the GOP in its genius put him in charge of its national campaign fund and now is wondering where all its money went. Incredible. (link)" / Twitter
noting
GOP spending under fire as Senate hopefuls seek rescue - The Washington Post - "A cash crunch at campaigns and the NRSC set off a panic as GOP candidates emerged from bruising primaries playing catch-up in polls and advertising"

What Sen. Scott did to the NRSC seems suspiciously close to what he did to Florida Medicare.
Donors are sending money to Bonespurs instead of sending it to the party.
 

Cheerful Charlie

Contributor
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
6,645
Location
Houston, Texas
Basic Beliefs
Strong Atheist
In Michigan, there has been a battle over adding a voter initiative to protect women's rights to choose to the November ballot. The Michigan supreme court has just struck down the GOP's efforts to prevent that from being on the ballot. There is also an initiative to protect voters' rights.

This means it will energize angry women voter turnout. Not good news for the GOP.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
Messages
32,023
Location
Frozen in Michigan
Gender
Old Fart
Basic Beliefs
Democratic Socialist Atheist
Holy crap! I just found out our Republican, far-right, uber-Christian, no-abortions-at-all, governor candidate starred in soft-core porn.

 

Cheerful Charlie

Contributor
Joined
Nov 11, 2005
Messages
6,645
Location
Houston, Texas
Basic Beliefs
Strong Atheist
Drama in Kansas. Right winged ultra conservative Dennis Pyle has just gotten enough signatures to run for governor as an independent. Kansas Republicans are furious with Pyle. Whose scorched Earth politics may well split the GOP vote and result in re-election of present Democratic Governor Laura Kelly.

Nice golem you all created GOP!
 

Derec

Contributor
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
22,330
Location
Atlanta, GA
Basic Beliefs
atheist
SC Senate Candidate Krystle Matthews seems to be a racist:
South Carolina Dems Pressure Senate Nominee to Withdraw over Anti-White Comments

National Review said:
In a video captured by Project Veritas, State Representative Krystle Matthews, who is challenging incumbent Republican Tim Scott in November’s general election, appeared to compare her constituents, who she said are mostly white, to unruly children who need to be restrained and bullied into submission. Her district is “slightly Republican,” she says.
Matthews told the journalist: “I keep them right here — like under my thumbs. … Otherwise, they get out of control — like kids.”
“And let me tell you one thing. You gotta know who you’re dealing with,” she added. “You’ve got to treat them like s—-. That’s the only way they’ll respect you.”

She also encouraged breaking election laws.
In a separate audio clip released in June by Project Veritas, Matthews appeared to tell a South Carolina inmate that illegal activities, such as using money derived from selling drugs, are necessary to support political campaigns. She also seemed to condone “secret sleepers” who steal opponents’ campaign signs in the middle of the night.
“Where the f—- are my black people with money? I don’t care about no dope money, give me that dope boy money. S—, where the f—, where’s the duffle bag boys? Get you, find you somebody in your family that doesn’t even know you’re donating to my campaign, and put that s— under their name. Like, what the f—,” Matthews said during the call.


That race is a hopeless one anyway, but it is still embarrassing for the Democratic Party to nominate somebody like this.
 

Derec

Contributor
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
22,330
Location
Atlanta, GA
Basic Beliefs
atheist
John Fetterman's health is a huge questionmark. It's not just about winning the race in November, but also serving in the Senate for at least six years.

This lingering issue isn't going away for John Fetterman

The CNN piece is mostly quoting WaPo, but WaPo articles are behind a very aggressive paywall, so I am going with CNN.

CNN said:
"Since returning to the campaign trail, Mr. Fetterman has been halting in his performances. He stammers, appears confused and keeps his remarks short. He has held no news conferences. Mr. Fetterman acknowledges his difficulties with auditory processing, which make it hard for him to respond quickly to what he's hearing. He receives speech therapy -- and we wish him a speedy, full recovery -- but the lingering, unanswered questions about his health, underscored by his hesitation to debate, are unsettling.
Seems that his stroke has been more serious than he has let on. We will see at the debate that he finally agreed to, although WaPo is probably right that there should be more than one. If his health is impeded, would it then be too late to drop out and endorse Connor Lamb?
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Raw Story.

The Virginia Libertarian Party has dissolved itself, discouraged by increasingly bigoted right wing politics oozing into the Libertarian Party.
Libertarian Party of Virginia dissolving after national party’s ‘bigoted’ turn, ex-chair says - Virginia Mercury
If the main purpose of a political party is to run candidates for office, former Libertarian Party of Virginia Chairwoman Holly Ward says it felt like a “violation” to keep taking people’s money. ...

The resolution to dissolve the state party, which Ward says was approved Sunday in a 7-6-1 vote by the party’s central committee, said the national party has become “functionally indistinct from other alt-right parties and movements.”

Those “destructive” ideas, the resolution said, include “endorsing thinly-veiled antisemitism, explicitly welcoming bigotry into the party, reversing the LP’s 50-year legacy of support for LGBTQ+ rights, and openly denouncing women’s suffrage, the civil rights act, and democracy itself.”

Ward attributed those trends to a Libertarian faction called the Mises Caucus, which she said is taking over the party apparatus and discouraging Libertarian candidates from running in swing states where they could hurt Republican votes and tilt the outcome toward Democrats.

Ward pointed to several social media posts as examples of the types of messages she opposed, including posts from the national party saying “Social justice is a Marxist lie created to bully and divide the American people,” defining democracy as “mob rule that endangers individual rights” and replying to the AP Stylebook suggesting the pronoun “she” could no longer be used “since we don’t know what a woman is anymore.” She also pointed to a deleted Martin Luther King Jr. Day Twitter post by the Libertarian Party of New Hampshire, an account the national party amplifies, that said “America isn’t in debt to black people, if anything it’s the other way around.” Another post from the New Hampshire account said “6 million dollar minimum wage or you’re antisemitic,” which many interpreted as a reference to the six million Jews killed in the Holocaust.

“Obviously I don’t support any of these messages,” Ward said. “It’s bigoted. It’s absolutely repugnant.”
Just like the old joke that a Libertarian is a Republican who smokes pot.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Opinion | The Wives of Republican Candidates Are Getting Personal - The New York Times
On some deep, even subconscious, level we are expected to absorb the message: If the candidate’s wife — and the mother of his children — thinks he’s a good guy, then it must be so.

Spare me. The notion that there is some meaningful insight about a candidate to be had from his spouse praising him in ads or defending him in interviews or simply appearing at his campaign events is weak at best. Gov. Ron DeSantis’s wife, Casey, may genuinely believe he’s the cat’s pajamas; that doesn’t change the guy’s disturbing authoritarian Trumpiness. Just because Heidi Cruz sticks with him does not make Senator Ted Cruz any less of a smirking, self-righteous, sedulously opportunistic jerk. Melania Trump’s willingness to put up with Donald’s vileness tells us far more about her than him. And the less said about Hillary and Bill Clinton’s tortured codependence, the better.

Let us set aside for the moment the enduring, and enduringly tiresome, political impulse to reduce even the most accomplished women to cheerleaders for their husbands’ domestic gifts. In the current political moment, this gimmick is not only trite but also distracting — and insulting to female voters.

Mr. Masters may well be the World’s Greatest Dad. That does not change the fact that until recently he was proudly declaring his extreme anti-abortion positions, including support for a federal personhood law. (Post-primary, of course, his website has been scrubbed of this info, and he is fast moderating his rhetoric to meet the moment.)

Mr. Vance may take out the trash without fail and read bedtime stories with exceptional panache. Or not. Either way, he has likened abortion to slavery and has pooh-poohed the need for exceptions in cases of rape or incest. (“Two wrongs don’t make a right,” he has glibly declared.)
and
Of course, some Republican political wives aren’t as interested in softening their boos’ positions as in giving them a feminine spin. At a rally last month in Pittsburgh, Rebecca Mastriano, whose husband, Doug, is running hard to the right in his quest to become Pennsylvania’s governor, had much to say about the G.O.P. and women’s rights. She started with abortion — “First, we believe in protecting the woman’s right to be born” — before wending her way through issues including a woman’s right to control her child’s education, to live in a safe community and to own a gun.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
Messages
32,023
Location
Frozen in Michigan
Gender
Old Fart
Basic Beliefs
Democratic Socialist Atheist
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) on Wednesday said that GOP Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene (Ga.) and Paul Gosar (Ariz.) will have their committee seats restored next year if Republicans win back the House despite their participation in a white nationalist conference last month.

McCarthy said that he has spoken with Greene in recent days but has yet to talk with Gosar after the two spoke at the America First Political Action Conference organized by white nationalist Nick Fuentes.

“She will not go again,” McCarthy said of Greene.

“There’s no place for what has gone on with that organization by far, and there never will be in this party, and it will never be tolerated,” McCarthy said at a press conference in the Capitol.

McCarthy pledged last fall to reinstate Greene and Gosar on House committees after Democrats — and a handful of Republicans — voted last year to take away their seats for promoting the idea of political violence.

And on Wednesday, he affirmed that hasn’t changed.

“They have the ability to be able to get committees based upon that time when it comes,” McCarthy said.
Yeah, right, Kev. :rolleyes:
 

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
11,453
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) on Wednesday said that GOP Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene (Ga.) and Paul Gosar (Ariz.) will have their committee seats restored next year if Republicans win back the House despite their participation in a white nationalist conference last month.

McCarthy said that he has spoken with Greene in recent days but has yet to talk with Gosar after the two spoke at the America First Political Action Conference organized by white nationalist Nick Fuentes.

“She will not go again,” McCarthy said of Greene.

“There’s no place for what has gone on with that organization by far, and there never will be in this party, and it will never be tolerated,” McCarthy said at a press conference in the Capitol.

McCarthy pledged last fall to reinstate Greene and Gosar on House committees after Democrats — and a handful of Republicans — voted last year to take away their seats for promoting the idea of political violence.

And on Wednesday, he affirmed that hasn’t changed.

“They have the ability to be able to get committees based upon that time when it comes,” McCarthy said.
Yeah, right, Kev. :rolleyes:
Sure, and Trump learned his lesson, Sinema...

The fact that she went, ever, as an adult over the age of 25 is too many, and too much.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
11,453
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
(...)
Yeah, right, Kev. :rolleyes:
Sure, and Trump learned his lesson, Sinema...
That was Susan Collins.
My bad. ._.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
The Campaign to Troll Dr. Oz for Living in New Jersey - The New York Times - "John Fetterman’s race for Senate in Pennsylvania has employed an unusual campaign strategy."
For much of the summer, Fetterman’s campaign sustained a viral media narrative that depicted Oz not just as a wealthy, out-of-touch celebrity with a tenuous connection to Pennsylvania, but as something that is, both regionally and nationwide, way more loathed: a guy from New Jersey.
Mehmet Oz was born in Ohio, raised in Delaware, and then lived in New Jersey for some decades.
Later in 2020, Oz formally adopted a Pennsylvania address — but early this summer, when he released a campaign video, the home he was speaking from looked a lot like the one he’d invited a magazine to photograph. Fetterman tweeted a tip: “Don’t film an ad for your Pennsylvania Senate campaign from your mansion in New Jersey.”
The article mentioned some more of JF's trolling of MO as a New Jersey carpetbagger.
Charges that a candidate is “not really from here” typically carry an undertow of class or ideology or, in darker moments, ethnicity. Fetterman’s, of course, is not remotely the xenophobic attack you might imagine a Muslim candidate like Oz facing. (Though an Armenian lobbying group has targeted Oz’s Turkish background and dual citizenship.) Neither is it primarily ideological. And while there is an implied class element — the celebrity doctor, looking down on Manhattan from an estate atop a literal cliff — this has not been the most palpable aspect of the snipe. Fetterman’s insults are laced with a specific regional animus that’s hard to imagine working the same way anywhere else.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Bolduc Wins New Hampshire Senate Primary, Realizing G.O.P. Fears - The New York Times
The race was called midday Wednesday, as Mr. Bolduc held a lead of more than 1,500 votes over Chuck Morse, the president of the State Senate.

Mr. Morse was endorsed by Gov. Chris Sununu and helped by $4.5 million from national Republicans, who were worried that a victory by Mr. Bolduc would forfeit what they saw as a winnable seat in the quest for Senate control this fall.

Mr. Bolduc’s victory will come as a relief to Democrats, who also assume he will be the weaker opponent against Senator Maggie Hassan, a first-term Democrat. She won in 2016 by about 1,000 votes in purple New Hampshire but has been saddled with low job approval numbers. Four states — New Hampshire, Arizona, Georgia and Nevada — have vulnerable Democratic senators the party is aggressively defending to keep its hold on the Senate.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
60 Percent Of Americans Will Have An Election Denier On The Ballot This Fall | FiveThirtyEight

Out of 552 Republican nominees running for office, 201 denied the legitimacy of the 2020 election, 61 raised questions about the legitimacy of that election, 105 had no comment, 17 avoided answering, 91 accepted those election results with reservations, and 77 fully accepted those election results.

That means that only 30% of those candidates accept the legitimacy of that election.

For the House, 118 election deniers and 8 election doubters have at least a 95% chance of winning, according to 538's modeling. There are several more in competitive races.

In the Senate, 3 election deniers are likely to join the 7 that are not up for re-election, and there also, some more are in competitive races.

Turning to state governors, at least 2 election deniers and 4 election doubters are likely to get elected, with some more possible in swing states like Arizona and Pennsylvania.

Some 7 election deniers are running for state attorney general and an additional 7 for secretary of state, the position that usually handles elections.

Indeed, an election denier winning election and taking office is more than a symbolic concern. An election-denying secretary of state could refuse to certify an election that he or she believes was rigged. An election-denying governor could attempt to submit electoral votes that defy the will of the people. And election-denying senators and representatives could vote to count those electoral votes. The 2022 election will determine how many of these candidates get that chance.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Election deniers are winning primaries: Why it matters for 2024 - The Washington Post
In many states, the secretary of state is the chief elections official. It’s a crucial job, but not one that many Americans have heard of, much less paid attention to.

But secretary of state races are starting to get a lot more national attention and money. Former president Donald Trump and his allies have succeeded in boosting 2020 election deniers as candidates this primary season, and in many states, they’ve won the Republican nomination. That means, by next year, election deniers could be in charge of their states’ elections, including in key swing states for the 2024 presidential race.
Though a secretary of state can't directly change an election's votes, a SOS can cause other sorts of trouble.
1. Make it harder to vote
2. Allow for endless audits of results
3. Refuse to sign off on election results
4. Sow distrust in results

Then some candidates to watch:

MI: Kristina Karamo -- "She is one of the loudest provocateurs spreading false election fraud claims. ... She would probably push to make it harder to vote. Karamo has talked about severely restricting or ending mail voting."

AZ: Mark Finchem -- "After the 2020 election, Finchem argued for throwing out the results of Arizona’s most populous county — despite the fact that a Republican-led audit ultimately found more votes for Joe Biden. ... As a state lawmaker, Finchem introduced a bill that would let the state legislature overturn election results. Before his primary this summer, he unsuccessfully sued to try to get Arizona to count ballots by hand."

NV: Jim Marchant -- "He ran for Congress in 2020, lost and sued to try to overturn his result. He was unsuccessful, but did catch the attention of Trump. ... At the top of his list is giving state lawmakers more say in determining election results, which would hand all or part of the decision about who wins to partisan politicians. He also wants to get rid of mailed ballots and voting machines, and count results by hand ..."

PA: the gov appoints the SOS -- "I get to appoint the secretary of state … I could decertify every machine in the state with the stroke of a pen."

FL: the gov appoints the SOS -- "In his first term, DeSantis signed into law a controversial election police force designed to investigate election fraud. The current secretary of state is Cord Byrd, a former right-wing state legislator who has refused to say Biden won in 2020 and will lead Florida’s election police force."

WI: "... the secretary of state is not the top election official. That job belongs to a bipartisan commission. But GOP nominee Amy Loudenbeck, alongside top Wisconsin Republicans, wants to hand that power to the secretary of state."

Other Republican secretaries of state on the ballot in November have pushed back forcefully against election-denying claims. Perhaps the best known is Brad Raffensperger in Georgia, who in 2020 refused Trump’s demand to “find” enough votes to flip the state to him. He easily won his primary this spring against a Trump-backed challenger.

But in 2022, denying the results of the 2020 election has been the price of admission in many Republican primaries across the country. And election experts say nowhere is that more dangerous for democracy than these secretary of state positions.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
2020 election deniers are winning secretary of state races : NPR - lists both winners and losers, like Rep. Jody Hice, who quit to run for GA SOS, but lost the Republican primary.

Trump's 2024 triumph - with a map of "States with at least one statewide GOP candidate who is a 2020 election denier" - a sizable fraction. Among them are some swing states, like PA and MI and WI and AZ.
Most of the hardcore denialists are likely to lose in November, Kraushaar reports. A big exception is Kari Lake for Arizona governor.

These nominees' underdog status underscores the fact that GOP voters have gone MAGA — but fringe views don't sell outside the party's primaries.


Pennsylvania's Republican Senate primary
The former president has a long history of insisting elections are fraudulent when he's expecting he won't get the outcome he wants. But historically, election officials around the country from both parties have complied with the law to count up and certify the vote regardless of their politics.
Then about how some election deniers could get into state offices.
"We have to be a lot sharper next time when it comes to counting the vote," Trump said in a video message earlier this year. "There's a famous statement: Sometimes the vote counter is more important than the candidate. And we can't let that ever, ever happen again," Trump said, referring to a quote from Soviet Union dictator Joseph Stalin.
 

bilby

Fair dinkum thinkum
Joined
Mar 7, 2007
Messages
28,231
Location
The Sunshine State: The one with Crocs, not Gators
Gender
He/Him
Basic Beliefs
Strong Atheist
Trump's 2024 triumph - with a map of "States with at least one statewide GOP candidate who is a 2020 election denier" - a sizable fraction
As I mentioned elsewhere, a person who genuinely believes that Trump won in both 2016 and 2020, must accept that this implies his ineligibility to run in 2024, under the conditions imposed by the 22nd Amendment.
 

fromderinside

Mazzie Daius
Joined
Oct 6, 2008
Messages
15,817
Location
Local group: Solar system: Earth: NA: US: contiguo
Basic Beliefs
optimist
Trump's 2024 triumph - with a map of "States with at least one statewide GOP candidate who is a 2020 election denier" - a sizable fraction
As I mentioned elsewhere, a person who genuinely believes that Trump won in both 2016 and 2020, must accept that this implies his ineligibility to run in 2024, under the conditions imposed by the 22nd Amendment.
Thanks. Because what you expose there's a lot of MAGA hat shards out there revealing a lot of MAGA rednecks. What we're calling a no brainer storm from the vast Qanon.
 

Patooka

Contributor
Joined
Apr 5, 2004
Messages
5,056
Location
Sydney
Basic Beliefs
aaa
As I mentioned elsewhere, a person who genuinely believes that Trump won in both 2016 and 2020, must accept that this implies his ineligibility to run in 2024, under the conditions imposed by the 22nd Amendment.
Unfortunately, no. Q-tards have fabricated a work around since last year.

The idea stems from the belief among some QAnon followers that the United States turned from a country into a corporation after the passage of the District of Columbia Organic Act of 1871.
It's an odd, unfounded theory drawn from the sovereign citizen movement, an extreme libertarian fringe that opposes federal laws, general taxation and even the US currency on the grounds that they restrict individual rights.
Believers in the QAnon offshoot maintain that every US president, act and amendment passed after 1871 is illegitimate.

And yes Bilby, that means Trump's 2016 Presidency was technically illegitimate but you see it was legit because of...um...


WHY AREN'T YOU TALKING ABOUT HUNTER'S LAPTOP!!!!!!!!111111111

 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Newly Uncovered Emails Show Blake Masters’ Long History of Hating Democracy – Mother Jones
He's now running for US Senate in Arizona.
On Election Day in 2005, then–Stanford sophomore Blake Masters sent two emails to the listserv of his vegetarian co-op. In the first, Masters, now the Republican Senate candidate in Arizona, urged classmates to read an article about a California ballot measure “(i)f you must worship that miserably peculiar American diety [sic] called Democracy.” In the second, he put together a reading list that could have easily served as a crash course in anti-democratic libertarianism.

Two of the articles were by Hans-Hermann Hoppe, a German economist best known for his 2001 jeremiad Democracy: The God That Failed. One, a 1995 paper titled “The Political Economy of Monarchy and Democracy, and the Idea of a Natural Order,” argued that “the historic transition from monarchy to democracy represents not progress but civilizational decline.” In addition to advocating “the abdication of democracy,” Hoppe wanted people to accept a “natural order” under which a “voluntarily acknowledged ‘natural’ elite—a nobilitas naturalis” reigns supreme.
A natural nobility???
It showed how Masters and his former boss, the billionaire investor Peter Thiel, transitioned from libertarians who hoped to escape politics to authoritarian sympathizers who seek to protect their liberty by gaining control of the state.

... Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and National Republican Senatorial Committee leader Rick Scott have done little to hide their frustration after being saddled with an underperforming first-time candidate who has a penchant for needless provocation.

Hans-Hermann Hoppe was an influence on Curtis Yarvin, "Mencius Moldbug", a supporter of absolute monarchy. HHH: “because of selective mating and marriage and the laws of civil and genetic inheritance, positions of natural authority are more likely than not passed on within a few—noble—families.”

So it's genetics? I think that with genomics so well-developed, we may soon be able to test for anything unusual in the genetics of members of noble and royal families.
In Democracy: The God That Failed, Hoppe was more explicit about those further down the social ladder, referring to them as “human trash which drives individual property values down.” In 2016, Thiel was set to speak at a conference in Turkey hosted by Hoppe’s Property and Freedom Society—a group whose past guests had included white nationalists like Richard Spencer and Jared Taylor—only to pull out after the news sparked a backlash.

Along with the Hoppe articles, Masters linked to an interview with Murray Rothbard, a Hoppe mentor whose idea of liberty allowed for defenses of Strom Thurmond, Joe McCarthy, and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. He also shared pieces from Paul Gottfried, who has been called the “Alt-Right’s Jewish Godfather,” and Thomas DiLorenzo, a strident critic of Abraham Lincoln who has managed to get panned by both the Southern Poverty Law Center and the hard-right Claremont Review of Books.
It's revealing what statists a self-styled libertarian likes.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
In February 2006, Masters sent an email to the listserv plugging a post on his Stanford blog that argued that roads should be privatized. The next day, he shared another that claimed the United States entered World War I to “to save banking interests and to fulfil [sic] Wilsons [sic] personal fantasy dream of a world government.” He quickly made the same argument in an article for the anti-state website LewRockwell.com. Channeling Rothbard, he wrote that the United States, hadn’t “been involved in a just war in over 140 years.” (After Jewish Insider found the article, Masters said that he had gone “too far” in making that claim.)
Meaning that the US Civil War was the last war that the US was legitimately involved in. He later claimed that he went "too far" because he was exposed as implying that US involvement in World War II was illegitimate.
More than a decade later, the student of propaganda had left the classroom. He launched his campaign by calling for an America where families could get by on one income, only to provide no coherent plan for making that happen. He claimed Trump won the election, but added qualifiers to suggest to his more reality-based followers that he didn’t believe voting machines had actually been rigged. He called abortion “demonic” and a “genocide” then revamped his website’s abortion section after making it out of the primary.

Today, Masters is trailing Kelly in the polls, McConnell’s super-PAC is pulling ad spending, and Thiel is saying funding Masters’ campaign isn’t his responsibility. Theory is proving harder than practice.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Blake Masters Is Peter Thiel’s Dream Candidate—and a Total Nightmare for Democracy – Mother Jones
In the spring of 2012, Blake Masters, who was in his final year at Stanford Law, sat in on a computer science class taught by Peter Thiel, the billionaire co-founder of PayPal. During a lecture titled “Founder as Victim, Founder as God,” Thiel argued a kinglike leader was essential to innovation. “A startup is basically structured as a monarchy,” he explained. “We don’t call it that, of course. That would seem weirdly outdated, and anything that’s not democracy makes people uncomfortable.”

Afterward, Masters tweeted that the lecture was the best 90 minutes he’d ever spent in a classroom and linked to the exhaustive notes he’d been taking on Thiel’s course.

"Earlier in his career, Thiel wrote about creating floating colonies in the ocean, while Masters told people not to vote."

Floating cities are a common libertarian pipedream. They have talked about floating cities a lot, but they never seem to have come anywhere close to building one. The closest that any libertarian has come was in founding the  Republic of Minerva on some reefs in the Pacific Ocean. In 1971, the republic's founders dumped some sand on the reefs, bringing them above sea level. But early in 1972, the nearby nation of Tonga claimed the republic's territory, and later that year backed up that claim by sending an expedition to that republic and conquering it. And that was that for the Republic of Minerva.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
"A decade after his startup lectures, there should no longer be any doubt that Thiel’s sympathy for authoritarianism extends well beyond the private sector."

Which explains why Peter Thiel is supporting several Republican candidates, JD Vance in Ohio and Blake Masters in Arizona.
They include Curtis Yarvin, who describes himself as America’s foremost absolute monarchist blogger; Murray Rothbard, the reactionary economist who suggested libertarians use right-wing populism to push their agenda; and Ted Kaczynski, the Unabomber, whom Masters has praised (with caveats). Another favorite is Lee Kuan Yew, the late dictator of Singapore who oversaw a miraculous economic transformation while crushing the civil liberties of those who stood in the way.

But no one is as influential as Thiel, who confessed in a 2009 essay, “I no longer believe that freedom and democracy are compatible.” He went on to warn that the “fate of our world may depend on the effort of a single person who builds or propagates the machinery of freedom that makes the world safe for capitalism.”

Thiel is setting himself up to be that builder. Masters is one of his tools.
Lee Kuan Yew was a sort of latter-day Cato the Elder, someone very hard-assed but uncorrupt.
Many of the more than a dozen friends and acquaintances of Masters I’ve spoken with, including the best man at his wedding, have been shocked to see the transformation of someone who used to consider himself an open-borders libertarian turn into an America First nationalist whom Tucker Carlson calls “the future of the Republican Party.”
Open-boarders libertarian? Open borders involve less government than closed borders, so that's actually consistent with libertarians' claimed beliefs.
In the one article he wrote for the Stanford Daily, Masters argued that voting is usually immoral because it leads to others being forced to pay taxes: “People who support what we euphemistically call ‘democracy’ or ‘representative government’ support stealing certain kinds of goods and redistributing them as they see fit.” He urged his fellow students not to participate in the 2006 midterms.
One could even say that about some libertarians' ideal of a night-watchman state, that it involves distributing resources from self-protectors to those who are too lazy to protect themselves. So one ends up with anarchism.

"The numerous messages shared with Mother Jones reveal a man largely unsympathetic to those who would lose out if his version of libertarianism prevailed." -- something very common among right-libertarians, in my experience.

"When will someone start a group that’s pro-gun (pro-freedom) AND pro-choice (pro-freedom)?" -- he objected to restrictions on both guns and abortions back then.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
After co-founding PayPal and becoming Facebook’s first major outside investor, in 2004 Thiel started the surveillance company Palantir with Joe Lonsdale, whose future wife was also in the co-op with Masters. Thiel and Lonsdale set out to win federal contracts to help defense and immigration agencies mine massive government databases in the name of protecting national security. Thiel later wrote an essay suggesting that he saw a strongman leader as the way to survive a post-9/11 world.
That ought to be dangerous for a libertarian, because military and police forces are coercive.
It was in another essay, in 2009, “The Education of a Libertarian,” that Thiel declared he no longer believed that democracy and freedom were compatible. “Since 1920,” he argued, “the vast increase in welfare beneficiaries and the extension of the franchise to women—two constituencies that are notoriously tough for libertarians—have rendered the notion of ‘capitalist democracy’ into an oxymoron.” (Thiel, known for playing things close to the vest, would later say about that essay, “Writing is always such a dangerous thing.”) Thiel stressed that he still considered himself a libertarian because he opposed “confiscatory taxes, totalitarian collectives, and the ideology of the inevitability of the death of every individual.”

PT likes the book "The Sovereign Individual" - "Its main argument is that a new cosmopolitan elite will destroy countries’ ability to redistribute money by fleeing to whichever tiny jurisdictions offer them the best investment terms." - only if those countries don't send military forces after them, as Tonga did with the Republic of Minerva.
These Sovereign Individuals will get to “interact on terms that echo the relation among the gods in Greek myth.” The “losers,” meanwhile, will be stuck in crumbling nations until they realize they “suffer for being saddled with mass democracy” and embrace privatized government.
Like the capitalist heroes who fled to Galt's Gulch in Ayn Rand's novel "Atlas Shrugged".
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
Peter Thiel’s Handpicked Candidates Are Train Wrecks | The New Republic
Blake Masters and J.D. Vance, Republican nominees for Senate in Arizona and Ohio, respectively, have two things in common. One is that they’re both terrible candidates—charisma-free voids, running on a slate of radical, unpopular policies. Another is that they’ve become Trumpworld favorites despite each having a history of MAGA heresies. Masters was in favor of unrestricted immigration before he was against it; Vance called Donald Trump “cultural heroin” and spent most of the 2016 election trying to position himself as a kinder, gentler Republican that the GOP could turn to after Trump got slaughtered in the general election. Whoops!
Then on how the 2022 campaign is going - Republicans are recently not doing as well as expected.
Earlier this year, Thiel was touted not just as the next Republican megadonor but as the party’s prime theorist—the higher mind shaping the future of the right. Donald Trump’s hold on the Republican Party is powerful, if not absolute; but it’s short on ideas, original or otherwise. Much of Trump’s political project revolves around personal loyalty and policies that seem to have been hastily plucked from a grab bag of old-school Republican positions (build a border wall, deregulate everything, cut taxes for the wealthy). His monomaniacal focus in recent years has been his denial of the legitimacy of the 2020 election. Thiel has attempted to backfill this vacuum by burnishing some of Trump’s less passionate positions—on foreign alliances, for instance—while pushing a vision of this own that revolves around an unrelenting assault on both democracy and the idea of any level of wealth distribution from rich people like himself to, well, anyone else.
He doesn't like democracy, but anarchy is not very stable, and that leaves dictatorship. A big problem with dictators is that they don't have much taste for civil liberties. So to hold on to his wealth, he'd have to suck up to the leadership. That is not just theoretical. Consider what has happened to oligarchs in places like Russia, China, and Saudi Arabia when they have displeased the leaders. Unless, perhaps, the leadership can be bought, as too many US politicians seem happy to be.
Thiel is not just anti-democratic, he’s a techno-elitist—Vance and Masters used to work with him; both are extremely wealthy venture capitalists. Although they have run campaigns based around nativism and xenophobia—what some call “right-wing populism”—they remain deeply opposed to policies that might either benefit the poor or inconvenience the wealthy. Vance and Masters are also notably lacking the “common touch” that most practiced politicians develop—which is hardly a shock given they have spent several years working in finance.
Like JDV scheduling a rally with Donald Trump at the same time as an Ohio State football game.
Thiel will no doubt continue to build his ideological project and pursue his political interests: protecting the plutocratic class from all incursions, promoting hostility toward China, degrading international institutions, and weakening the social welfare state. He has hit on a formula familiar to many Republicans: aggressively push red-meat culture-war issues like immigration while quietly undermining democracy and transferring wealth to the richest Americans. Thiel hasn’t yet gotten the formula right: His candidates are pushing ideas so extreme on every front that voters are recoiling.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
GOP seeks midterm reset as inflation, abortion temper ambitions - The Washington Post - "The Republican Party’s hopes for a red wave this November dimmed on flagging fundraising and an emphasis on inflation that’s lost some of its potency"
Republican leaders are scrambling to shore up their chances to win back both the House and Senate as inflation concerns fade, Democratic enthusiasm for protecting abortion rights surges and new fundraising challenges emerge in the crucial final months of the campaign.

GOP officials have been mixing up their advertising spending, with a new focus on issues like crime, plans for a major policy rollout meant to reclaim voter attention and moves to send reinforcements for struggling Senate candidates.
What policy rollout might that be? I haven't seen anything yet.

Peter Thiel Shares What He Thinks About Ron DeSantis
Billionaire investor and Trump megadonor Peter Thiel praises Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis as 'the best of the governors' for offering 'a real alternative to California'
  • Thiel said Republicans need to do more than point to problems in liberal states like California.
  • Of all GOP governors, DeSantis was the one doing it right, Thiel said.
  • But he added that he worried about soaring housing prices in the Sunshine State.
So that oligarch has found another candidate that he likes.
 

Jarhyn

Wizard
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
11,453
Gender
Androgyne; they/them
Basic Beliefs
Natural Philosophy, Game Theoretic Ethicist
GOP seeks midterm reset as inflation, abortion temper ambitions - The Washington Post - "The Republican Party’s hopes for a red wave this November dimmed on flagging fundraising and an emphasis on inflation that’s lost some of its potency"
Republican leaders are scrambling to shore up their chances to win back both the House and Senate as inflation concerns fade, Democratic enthusiasm for protecting abortion rights surges and new fundraising challenges emerge in the crucial final months of the campaign.

GOP officials have been mixing up their advertising spending, with a new focus on issues like crime, plans for a major policy rollout meant to reclaim voter attention and moves to send reinforcements for struggling Senate candidates.
What policy rollout might that be? I haven't seen anything yet.

Peter Thiel Shares What He Thinks About Ron DeSantis
Billionaire investor and Trump megadonor Peter Thiel praises Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis as 'the best of the governors' for offering 'a real alternative to California'
  • Thiel said Republicans need to do more than point to problems in liberal states like California.
  • Of all GOP governors, DeSantis was the one doing it right, Thiel said.
  • But he added that he worried about soaring housing prices in the Sunshine State.
So that oligarch has found another candidate that he likes.
Apparently he likes criminals.

What a surprise.
 

Swammerdami

Squadron Leader
Staff member
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
3,027
Location
Land of Smiles
Basic Beliefs
pseudo-deism
lpetrich said:
Rick Scott's Fraud Settlement Resurfaces as Senate GOP Runs Low on Cash

Aren't graft and grift key virtues in Republican philosophy? Why else would they put a known embezzler in charge of their money? They run con-men for POTUS, then vote Yea when he nominates fraudsters like Ross and DeVos. Surely Scott's status as a top QOP Senator should only improve if he's guilty of yet more embezzlement.

Tudor Dixon is among the leading candidates for the GOP nomination for Michigan governor. Also. Vampire porn actress. Can’t make this shit up.

. . .
Lauren Boebert opens up her debate tonight by attacking the moderator.

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) on Wednesday said that GOP Reps. Marjorie Taylor Greene (Ga.) and Paul Gosar (Ariz.) will have their committee seats restored next year if Republicans win back the House despite their participation in a white nationalist conference last month.

McCarthy said that he has spoken with Greene in recent days but has yet to talk with Gosar after the two spoke at the America First Political Action Conference organized by white nationalist Nick Fuentes.
Yeah, right, Kev. :rolleyes:

It's so preciously Republican when a Level-8 asshole forgives a Level-10 asshole.

The race was called midday Wednesday, as Mr. Bolduc held a lead of more than 1,500 votes over Chuck Morse, the president of the State Senate.

Mr. Morse was endorsed by Gov. Chris Sununu and helped by $4.5 million from national Republicans, who were worried that a victory by Mr. Bolduc would forfeit what they saw as a winnable seat in the quest for Senate control this fall.

Mr. Bolduc’s victory will come as a relief to Democrats, who also assume he will be the weaker opponent against Senator Maggie Hassan, a first-term Democrat. She won in 2016 by about 1,000 votes in purple New Hampshire but has been saddled with low job approval numbers. Four states — New Hampshire, Arizona, Georgia and Nevada — have vulnerable Democratic senators the party is aggressively defending to keep its hold on the Senate.

One bullet from Bolduc's resume should give you the idea:
* Bolduc claimed that COVID-19 vaccines are really "Bill Gates saying we should put (micro)chips inside people."

Home sapiens are quitting the QOP in droves, and the Party is being taken over by some mutant strain — Homo brutus ? It would be amusing except that many of these hate-filled morons will get elected.
 

ZiprHead

Loony Running The Asylum
Staff member
Joined
Oct 23, 2002
Messages
32,023
Location
Frozen in Michigan
Gender
Old Fart
Basic Beliefs
Democratic Socialist Atheist
WASHINGTON (AP) — Campaigning for a northwestern Ohio congressional seat, Republican J.R. Majewski presents himself as an Air Force combat veteran who deployed to Afghanistan after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, once describing “tough” conditions including a lack of running water that forced him to go more than 40 days without a shower.

Military documents obtained by The Associated Press through a public records request tell a different story.

They indicate Majewski never deployed to Afghanistan but instead completed a six-month stint helping to load planes at an air base in Qatar, a longtime U.S. ally that is a safe distance from the fighting.

Majewski’s account of his time in the military is just one aspect of his biography that is suspect. His post-military career has been defined by exaggerations, conspiracy theories, talk of violent action against the U.S. government and occasional financial duress.
 

Swammerdami

Squadron Leader
Staff member
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
3,027
Location
Land of Smiles
Basic Beliefs
pseudo-deism
WASHINGTON (AP) — Campaigning for a northwestern Ohio congressional seat, Republican J.R. Majewski presents himself as an Air Force combat veteran who deployed to Afghanistan after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, once describing “tough” conditions including a lack of running water that forced him to go more than 40 days without a shower.

Military documents obtained by The Associated Press through a public records request tell a different story.

They indicate Majewski never deployed to Afghanistan but instead completed a six-month stint helping to load planes at an air base in Qatar, a longtime U.S. ally that is a safe distance from the fighting.

Majewski’s account of his time in the military is just one aspect of his biography that is suspect. His post-military career has been defined by exaggerations, conspiracy theories, talk of violent action against the U.S. government and occasional financial duress.

Wow. Unqualified for dogcatcher, he runs for Congress and gets the nod from the QOP. You can't make this stuff up.

Majewski is running in Ohio's 9th Congressional District which voted Biden over Trump 59-40 in 2020. However district lines have been redrawn and Biden lost 47-51 in the precincts making up the new 9th. (It looks like urban parts of western Greater Cleveland were removed from the 9th and replaced with suburbs of Toledo.) So the redistricting gave the GOP a chance to unseat Marcy Kaptur, the popular D incumbent. Let's hope nominating this jerk ruined that chance.

There's a website which shows candidates' answers to simple questions:
https://ballotpedia.org/J.R._Majewski said:
What characteristics or principles are most important for an elected official? Honesty, Integrity, Bravity, and the ability to communicate.
"Ability to communicate"? Is that like creating a portmonteau of brevity and bravery to circumvent a word limit?
https://ballotpedia.org/J.R._Majewski said:
What do you believe are the core responsibilities for someone elected to this office? To Represent the will of the people whom elected them.
Pro-tip: If uncertain between "who" and "whom," go with "who."
https://ballotpedia.org/J.R._Majewski said:
If you are not a current representative, are there certain committees that you would want to be a part of? Energy and Commerce due to my longstanding experience in the nuclear industry. Veterans Affairs due to being a veteran is the US Air Force.
Is there any reason to think Majewski's security job at a reactor was anything other than ordinary guard?

New York Times said:
. . . he first gained attention in Ohio by turning his lawn into a 19,000-square-foot “Trump 2020” sign.

During his campaign, he ran one ad showing him carrying an assault-style rifle in which he says, “I’m willing to do whatever it takes to return this country back to its former glory,” adding, “If I’ve got to kick down doors, well, that’s just what patriots do.”

He also posted a “Let’s Go Brandon” music video on his website in which he raps a verse, warning, “Just try to put a mask on me, you’ll see red, white and blue.”

If the QOP still takes the House in November despite running idiots and liars like this, I'll be able only to shake my head in amazement.
 

Jimmy Higgins

Contributor
Joined
Feb 1, 2001
Messages
37,483
Basic Beliefs
Calvinistic Atheist
So he served for America, but not quite as an exciting job. I'd imagine actual soldiers in Afghanistan might have reservations against him. It appears the GOP might be letting him go, cancelling an ad buy in his race against Kaptur who has a lot of incumbency here. But of course, conservatives are proving they'll vote for anyone. So he still has a decent shot, with Trump's blessing and all.

He is running for the Ninth District which went from gerrymandered non-contiguous strip of land from Toledo to Cleveland to stuff as many Dems into a single area possible, into a more republican friendly district which dilutes Toledo with a lot more land where no one lives.
 

lpetrich

Contributor
Joined
Jul 28, 2000
Messages
20,045
Location
Eugene, OR
Gender
Male
Basic Beliefs
Atheist
GOP governor candidate: Colorado should have electoral system | 9news.com - "Under Greg Lopez’s proposal, the 2018 gubernatorial race would have been a runaway win for Republicans, who lost the actual race by double-digits."
The plan, which would be the first of its kind on the state level, would give far more voting power to Coloradans in rural, conservative counties and dilute the voting power of Coloradans in more populous urban and suburban areas. Even as turnout numbers vary over time, the sheer number of rural conservative counties would create a built-in advantage for Republicans.

Lopez outlined his proposal at a May 15 campaign stop in Silverton. An audio recording of the event made by a political tracker was provided to 9NEWS.

...
Lopez said his electoral college plan would weight counties’ votes based on their voter turnout percentage to encourage turnout.

“I’ve already got the plan in place,” Lopez said. “The most that any county can get is 11 electoral college votes. The least that a county can get is three.”
Back in 2018, Democrat Jared Polis beat Republican Walker Stapleton by a margin of 10.6%. But with this system, WS would have beaten JP by 18%.
 
Top Bottom