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Post Your Own Wildlife Photography

crazyfingers

Super Moderator
Staff member
We got home from the coast of Maine yesterday. This will take 4 posts. I might not get to them all at once.

Post 1 of 4


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Three photos above of I think to be a spotted sandpiper. At mud creek, a tidal stream that is mud at low tide. Not sure what he's squawking at in the second photo. There were no other critters around. Or maybe it's yawning?

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An Osprey flying about also at mud creek.

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Song sparrow. Not sure where at this time. Probably down at the shore at our place.

Below at Seawall, a part of Acadia National Park there is a nice walk along a gravel beach that's also a small bay. I've frequently seen white tail deer around here. This one I guess is used to people being around. It let me get within around 10 feet of it before I intentionally spooked it. Not good for deer to not be afraid of people. It presents dangers for both people and deer.

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Below also at Seawall, the first photo is a herring gull and a laughing gull (Black head). It shows how much larger the herring gull is. And the herrring gull is farter away than the laughing gull.

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Two laughing gulls washing up.

Posts 2,3,and 4 to follow.
 

crazyfingers

Super Moderator
Staff member
Post 2 of 4



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At the Schoodic Section of Acadia National Park a herring gull is wondering if I have anything for him. Feeding the wildlife is against the rules but gulls still manage to steal things from people who have brought their lunch.

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A convoy of Canadian Geese off shore at Fraiser Point, part of Schoodic and the bay for the town of Winter Harbor.

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At Mud Creek again. A Great Blue Heron looking for food at low tide.

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Mud Creek still. Bad lighting. I think that this may be a lesser yellowlegs.

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I only snatched a brief sighting of these chicks at Mud Creek. I think a family of mallard duck chicks. They went down behind the mud and did not come out again while I was there. There were other adult mallards around.

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This is a curiosity. We went for a hike up Acadia Mountain on the Mount Desert Island section of the National park. Along a section of the trail each small opening had one of these flies just hovering in the middle. I'd guess that along about a 100 meter stretch of the trail every 10 meters or so there would be one of these flies just hovering. They were all facing the same direction. Butt end to me. I'm guessing that as the breeze blew towards them they were waiting for smaller insects to come along and to lunch on. Easily horse fly size.

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A chipmunk along the trail up Acadia Mountain.


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Back at the Schoodic section of Acadia National Park looking northeast toward the Petit Manan lighthouse that is about 9 miles away, as I snapped this shot of the lighthouse a juvenile Bald Eagle came by.

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The juvenile Bald Eagle continued to fly south and as it approached Schoodic Island, off limits to people as a bird sanctuary, gull came up to harass it.

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Still at Schoodic, a Cormorant flaps water out off its wings.
 

crazyfingers

Super Moderator
Staff member
Post 3 of 4

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Schoodic still. A flight of Cormorants. They do this a lot as they fly as a group along the coast.


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At the northern most section of Eagle Lake in Acadia, butterflies very much like these flowers. Unfortunately it was also very windy so it was hard to get a shot with the flowers not moving.

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At Bubble Pond, not far from Eagle Lake, a snapping turtle sunning itself on a rock.

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Closeup.

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Back at Eagle Lake again, a mom and chick common merganser. Pretty much the same spot and probably the same individuals that I photographed here a month ago.


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Taken from the front deck of our house, a family of turkeys came down the road and went into the field.

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At the town harbor looking down from the pier, a Lion's Mane Jellyfish floated by along with the tide. Lion's Mane Jellyfish are the largest species of jellyfish. The largest known had a bell of over 7 feet diameter and testicles 120 feet long. The testicles sting and though unlikely could kill a person. This is a lot smaller of course. I frequently see dead ones on the shore with bells over 2 feet.

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An invasive green crab. They are trying to find a way to eradicate these guys from Maine as they are destroying the selfish population.


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Back at Mud Creek, an Osprey on the nest on top of a power pole

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As I was photographing a second came in and landed.
 

crazyfingers

Super Moderator
Staff member
Post 4 of 4

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We discovered that there is a paper wasp nest attached to the side of our house that we don't so often go on. They were busy.

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This photo taken 24 hours later. They have made a lot of progress building this thing.

Since we don't often go on this side of the house the plan is to let it stay there until it gets cold and my sister in law will get rid of it.

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At low tide I was down at the shore and a herring gull came by with a green sea urchin. Herring gulls eat urchins, mussels, and other hard shelled critters by taking them up high and dropping them on the rocks. Urchins usually only take one drop to smash open. Mussels sometimes take two or more drops. This gull got it open on one drop and proceeded to eat out the urchin.

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At high tide gulls have little to do. The tend to congregate on rocks stand around or groom themselves.

That's it for this trip to Maine. We will be going back again on August 17 for another week.
 

4321lynx

Veteran Member

Yes. The dreaded Running Domestic Goose cloud. Many of you humans think this to be a cloud and because your primitive planes, missiles, and other rockets fly through these and collect only water vapour you do not realize these are really what you call UFO's, earthly traces of Dark Matter, cleverly camouflaged by means of shape and colour.:rolleyes:
 

Elixir

Content Thief
OK, not going to win any photo contests, but I wanted to share this because it's just so ... weird.
There is an old (at least 50 years) piece of steel culvert that has been getting re-absorbed by the woods near the river, just about 40 feet off the road to my house. It's about 8 feet in diameter and maybe 25 feet long. It's really massive - I think it's quarter inch riveted steel. For the last couple of months there is a young buck who has been occupying it whenever it's too hot, too cold, too rainy or whatever. We named him Kevin. Smartest deer ever - it's warm in there when it's cold, it's cool when it's hot, it's dry and spacious, keeps him hidden but there are two escape routes - it's perfect. He's basically invisible due to the overgrowth, but there's one spot from which it's possible to pick him out. Yesterday I stopped the car and tried to get a couple of shots with my phone. Here he is laying down watching me watching him:

Kev2.jpg
Kevin.jpg
 

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4321lynx

Veteran Member
OK, not going to win any photo contests, but I wanted to share this because it's just so ... weird.
There is an old (at least 50 years) piece of steel culvert that has been getting re-absorbed by the woods near the river, just about 40 feet off the road to my house. It's about 8 feet in diameter and maybe 25 feet long. It's really massive - I think it's quarter inch riveted steel. For the last couple of months there is a young buck who has been occupying it whenever it's too hot, too cold, too rainy or whatever. We named him Kevin. Smartest deer ever - it's warm in there when it's cold, it's cool when it's hot, it's dry and spacious, keeps him hidden but there are two escape routes - it's perfect. He's basically invisible due to the overgrowth, but there's one spot from which it's possible to pick him out. Yesterday I stopped the car and tried to get a couple of shots with my phone. Here he is laying down watching me watching him:

View attachment 23207
View attachment 23208

Excellent story & pics.
THANKS FOR SHARING.
 

crazyfingers

Super Moderator
Staff member
OK, not going to win any photo contests, but I wanted to share this because it's just so ... weird.
There is an old (at least 50 years) piece of steel culvert that has been getting re-absorbed by the woods near the river, just about 40 feet off the road to my house. It's about 8 feet in diameter and maybe 25 feet long. It's really massive - I think it's quarter inch riveted steel. For the last couple of months there is a young buck who has been occupying it whenever it's too hot, too cold, too rainy or whatever. We named him Kevin. Smartest deer ever - it's warm in there when it's cold, it's cool when it's hot, it's dry and spacious, keeps him hidden but there are two escape routes - it's perfect. He's basically invisible due to the overgrowth, but there's one spot from which it's possible to pick him out. Yesterday I stopped the car and tried to get a couple of shots with my phone. Here he is laying down watching me watching him:

View attachment 23207
View attachment 23208

I honestly can't recognize a deer. I guess I'm looking at it all wrong. But a very neat story. Near as I can tell our deer just walk around rain or shine. Sleep where they are. For a deer to think about a place as home seems pretty special.
 

bilby

Fair dinkum thinkum
View attachment 23231

A long-jawed orb weaver.


Rob

What on earth does that thing do for a living?

Orb weavers are snare hunters - they build large and impressive webs.

The silk of a cousin of that spider, the golden orb weaver, has even been made into clothing.

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https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2012-01-25/spider-silk-outfit-on-show/3791928

This gown took 80 people five years to make. So it's extremely expensive - though I doubt that tbe spiders get a large cut of the profits.

(Yes, that's the natural colour of the silk).
 

Potoooooooo

Contributor
Blackbird's breath smoking in the cold
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Mediancat

Super Moderator
Staff member
crew 4.jpg

Eastern wood-pewee.

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White-breasted nuthatch.

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Cooper's hawk.

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Red morph fall webworm moth.

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Common buckeye.

Rob
 

crazyfingers

Super Moderator
Staff member
Our last trip to Maine this summer Late August.

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A laughing gull at Schootic

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A common Loon in the fog

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Two cormorants at the shore by the house

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A school most likely of mackerel off shore by the house

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A harbor seal feeding on the school of mackerel

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Some butterfly

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Sandpiper by the shore

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On Eagle Lake, a snapping turtle on a rock and a dragonfly on the snapping turtle

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A bald eagle at Jordan Pond

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A herring gull at the shore.

15 minutes after taking the photo of the gull we got a call to come home. My dad was being taken to the hospital. About an hour later my neighbor called to tell me that my dad had died. https://talkfreethought.org/showthr...way-it-was-supposed-to-go&p=710928#post710928
 

Mediancat

Super Moderator
Staff member
kew 13.jpg

A common wood-nymph.

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Two great egrets.

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Osprey.

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Great egret, cattle egret, snowy egret.

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Variegated fritillary caterpillar.

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Greater yellowlegs.

Rob
 

Tharmas

Veteran Member
Here are some pictures I took in the Galapagos about fifteen years ago.

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Albatross taking off. They sort of throw themselves off a cliff and wait for an up-current to take them aloft.

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Bluefoot Booby male dancing to attract a mate.

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Bluefoot Booby incubating eggs on a "nest" (hey, you use the materials you've got).

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Flamingos

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Galapagos Flightless Cormorant. They sort of use their vestigial wings like penguins, as paddles when they're diving. I had inadvertently set some weird blue filter on the camera. Took me a while to figure out how to turn it off.

I have some more I'll post later.
 

Tharmas

Veteran Member
More Galapagos Birds

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Frigate Birds

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Galapagos Mockingbirds...quite tame

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Swallow Tailed Gull

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Penguins (had the same problem with the damned blue filter)

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Red Footed Booby among Mangroves

Next, some four-footed creatures.
 

Tharmas

Veteran Member
Galapagos Critters

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Baby harbor seal. IIRC they travel from California. I was reprimanded for getting to close...mama was getting resrtless.

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Galapagos Land Iguana

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Marine Iguana sunning in the morning affter a night in the ocean

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Some of the famous Galapagos tortoises
 

Mediancat

Super Moderator
Staff member
mew 8.jpg

Woolly bear caterpillar.

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Blue jay.

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Hooded merganser.

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Red-bellied woodpecker.

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Dark-eyed junco.

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Ruddy duck.

Rob
 

Mediancat

Super Moderator
Staff member
grew 1.jpg

Honeybee. Seen on December 15, temperature 45 degrees Fahrenheit..

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Female cardinal.

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Gadwall.

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White-throated sparrow.

Rob
 

crazyfingers

Super Moderator
Staff member
I saw the photos last night. This morning they are not showing. I guess the server switch had something to do with it.
 

Worldtraveller

Veteran Member
Some of the more interesting wildlife I saw on my recent cruise:

Not 100% sure what species this is. This was a beach in Acapulco, if that makes it any easier to identify. I think it's a short billed Dowitcher, but I dunno.
https://drive.google.com/open?id=18YA4T11GknFH71YeVosF_G6Pfqjq_vt3

Masked booby in flight:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1RiK8aVXVOBt-t9QX7Gt1zUY_fvCg_ogK

Brown booby:
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1K6PnoonVzX8FMeSWkKvQRu6xxoIe0CEl

Anyone know what kind of lizard this is? (Taken on the beach in Aruba.)
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1A2Q58bd9uVoQBXyA4Is5CyOY7Jtma9FO
 
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