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Questions For Women

Shadowy Man

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Here's a question for women that I hope doesn't devolve into a stand-off.

To my mind, a front-clasp bra would be easier for a woman to put on and off, but they seem to be the exception rather than the rule. Am I wrong about that, or is there some other reason that most bras are rear-clasp?

This has nothing to do about access for a significant other--just everyday wear.

When a woman wears a bra that clasps in the back, it's really quite simple. She just clasps it in the front, then simply turns the bra around, and pulls the strap over her shoulders.

That doesn’t quite seem to answer the question. What you described sounds like a workaround to a design failure. The question would be why is the predominantly worn design one for which you have to utilize the workaround rather than one that appears to be designed “properly”?

There could be reasons like perhaps the clasp is uncomfortable if it’s in the front or ones with front clasps have other limitations that a woman would understand.
 

southernhybrid

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I have very long hair, even longer due to the pandemic. In fact, I might never get it cut again. That's how much I enjoy wearing my hair long. I keep my bangs just over or nearly over my eyebrows. That way, I no longer worry about how my eyebrows look. I used to have them waxed and trimmed regularly. Now, they are just about covered by my hair. The only time my hair becomes annoying is when I'm outside and it's windy. When it's hot, I can let it dry naturally and then put it into a pony tail. I've had my hair very short when I was working full time and didn't want to deal with it. But, since childhood, my preference has been for long hair. I've worn it in many different lengths. I've been told numerous times that older women shouldn't wear their hair long, but now, long hair on older women is considered fashionable.

I really don't care what the style is, I'm going to wear my hair as long as I want. My favorite past patient was an atheist who wore her hair down to her waist at age 87. I was broken hearted when she died only about 4 or 5 months after I met her. She was the coolest old woman I ever met and she dressed and wore her hair exactly how she wanted. That's how it should be for all of us.

Do your thing!

"If the music make you move
And you take the groove,
Groove on, groove on
If you feel like you wanna make love
Under the stars above,
Love on, love on
If there's something you wanna say
And talkin' is the only way,
Rap on, oh, rap on
'Cause whatever you do
Hey, do your thing"

So, do your thing and don't give a fuck about what others think about your hair. Wear it down to your waist, over your eyes, short and spiky, crew cut, bald.....just do your thing and never let a man tell you how to wear your hair.
 

southernhybrid

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Here's a question for women that I hope doesn't devolve into a stand-off.

To my mind, a front-clasp bra would be easier for a woman to put on and off, but they seem to be the exception rather than the rule. Am I wrong about that, or is there some other reason that most bras are rear-clasp?

This has nothing to do about access for a significant other--just everyday wear.

When a woman wears a bra that clasps in the back, it's really quite simple. She just clasps it in the front, then simply turns the bra around, and pulls the strap over her shoulders.

That doesn’t quite seem to answer the question. What you described sounds like a workaround to a design failure. The question would be why is the predominantly worn design one for which you have to utilize the workaround rather than one that appears to be designed “properly”?

There could be reasons like perhaps the clasp is uncomfortable if it’s in the front or ones with front clasps have other limitations that a woman would understand.

Oh how we love a man to explain things to us. I don't wear bras that have any clasps but for years I did wear the ones that clasp in the back. I found them easier and more comfortable to wear compared to the ones that clasped in the front. Do you wear a bra? I didn't think so. So, please don't tell a woman which type of bra is more comfortable or easier to put on.
 

Tharmas

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I just wish I could wear hair down in front of my eyes. I suppose I could, but it would take one hell of a comb-over.
 

Elixir

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That doesn’t quite seem to answer the question. What you described sounds like a workaround to a design failure. The question would be why is the predominantly worn design one for which you have to utilize the workaround rather than one that appears to be designed “properly”?

There could be reasons like perhaps the clasp is uncomfortable if it’s in the front or ones with front clasps have other limitations that a woman would understand.

Oh how we love a man to explain things to us. I don't wear bras that have any clasps but for years I did wear the ones that clasp in the back. I found them easier and more comfortable to wear compared to the ones that clasped in the front. Do you wear a bra? I didn't think so. So, please don't tell a woman which type of bra is more comfortable or easier to put on.

I can only testify that a clasp in the back can be more discreetly undone than one in the front. At least by me. When I was a teenager.
 

Toni

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What few men and not enough women understand about bras is that the primary support comes from the band that goes around the body. It most frequently clasps in back because that part of a woman’s body tends to be flatter, allowing fir a broader band which typically is a bit more contoured in the front, to fit around the front, more bowed portion of the rib cage.

I’ve tried front clasp bras and don’t find them as comfortable. This was true even when I was quite thin and required less support—in fact, wore bras for modesty only.

There are many different styles and sizes of bras because they need to fit as well
as possible in order to provide needed support and to be comfortable. An uncomfortable bra can dig into shoulders and ribcages, can ride up so that the band digs into the breast. Women with larger breasts especially need well fitting, well made bras that provide sufficient support to avoid debilitating back aches.

It’s not the same as buying a three pack of Hanes t’shirts. Unfortunately.
 

Loren Pechtel

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What few men and not enough women understand about bras is that the primary support comes from the band that goes around the body. It most frequently clasps in back because that part of a woman’s body tends to be flatter, allowing fir a broader band which typically is a bit more contoured in the front, to fit around the front, more bowed portion of the rib cage.

I’ve tried front clasp bras and don’t find them as comfortable. This was true even when I was quite thin and required less support—in fact, wore bras for modesty only.

There are many different styles and sizes of bras because they need to fit as well
as possible in order to provide needed support and to be comfortable. An uncomfortable bra can dig into shoulders and ribcages, can ride up so that the band digs into the breast. Women with larger breasts especially need well fitting, well made bras that provide sufficient support to avoid debilitating back aches.

It’s not the same as buying a three pack of Hanes t’shirts. Unfortunately.

As a male I have a hard time picturing a good front clasp design. Typically the bra cups basically touch in front--where are you going to put the clasp??
 

Toni

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What few men and not enough women understand about bras is that the primary support comes from the band that goes around the body. It most frequently clasps in back because that part of a woman’s body tends to be flatter, allowing fir a broader band which typically is a bit more contoured in the front, to fit around the front, more bowed portion of the rib cage.

I’ve tried front clasp bras and don’t find them as comfortable. This was true even when I was quite thin and required less support—in fact, wore bras for modesty only.

There are many different styles and sizes of bras because they need to fit as well
as possible in order to provide needed support and to be comfortable. An uncomfortable bra can dig into shoulders and ribcages, can ride up so that the band digs into the breast. Women with larger breasts especially need well fitting, well made bras that provide sufficient support to avoid debilitating back aches.

It’s not the same as buying a three pack of Hanes t’shirts. Unfortunately.

As a male I have a hard time picturing a good front clasp design. Typically the bra cups basically touch in front--where are you going to put the clasp??

Between the cups. It’s not the same type of hooks as on a back clasping bra so it works but not great. I thought it would be a great convenience but it really wasn’t—except while I was breast feeding. That would not have worked very well if I had been larger busted and needed the extra support more than I did. Truthfully, fro t clasps, which are typically plastic, just don’t last as long and are not adjustable. Most bras have two or three sets of hooks in the band that allow you to tighten the fir as the elastic gives, allowing the bra to last longer. Also: bras do not belong in a dryer—too hard on the ekastic. A good bra is not inexpensive but worth the cost. You just have to take care of it.
 

Shadowy Man

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That doesn’t quite seem to answer the question. What you described sounds like a workaround to a design failure. The question would be why is the predominantly worn design one for which you have to utilize the workaround rather than one that appears to be designed “properly”?

There could be reasons like perhaps the clasp is uncomfortable if it’s in the front or ones with front clasps have other limitations that a woman would understand.

Oh how we love a man to explain things to us. I don't wear bras that have any clasps but for years I did wear the ones that clasp in the back. I found them easier and more comfortable to wear compared to the ones that clasped in the front. Do you wear a bra? I didn't think so. So, please don't tell a woman which type of bra is more comfortable or easier to put on.
wow! This is a thread for questions for women. I asked a question for women. I guess I’m not wanted here. Thanks for clearing that up.
 

Toni

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That doesn’t quite seem to answer the question. What you described sounds like a workaround to a design failure. The question would be why is the predominantly worn design one for which you have to utilize the workaround rather than one that appears to be designed “properly”?

There could be reasons like perhaps the clasp is uncomfortable if it’s in the front or ones with front clasps have other limitations that a woman would understand.

Oh how we love a man to explain things to us. I don't wear bras that have any clasps but for years I did wear the ones that clasp in the back. I found them easier and more comfortable to wear compared to the ones that clasped in the front. Do you wear a bra? I didn't think so. So, please don't tell a woman which type of bra is more comfortable or easier to put on.
wow! This is a thread for questions for women. I asked a question for women. I guess I’m not wanted here. Thanks for clearing that up.

A woman answered a question and you critiqued her answer. Maybe not the best way to go here.
 

Shadowy Man

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wow! This is a thread for questions for women. I asked a question for women. I guess I’m not wanted here. Thanks for clearing that up.

A woman answered a question and you critiqued her answer. Maybe not the best way to go here.

I did not critique it. I asked for more clarification. The question was why most bras clasped in the back when it would seem easier to clasp in front. The answer was that she puts it on backwards, clasps in the front, and turns it around. But the question was not about how a woman does it but why it’s designed that way so I asked if it “appears” simpler to have clasps in front then what is it that makes it more common to clasp in back. I guess you interpreted my post differently than that. Perhaps it is simply difficult to get the proper tone in a post like this but I had no expectation that what I wrote would be considered “mansplaining” since I offered no explanation just further questioning.

ETA: I went back to my post to read it again. I think you maybe reacted to the last part. In that part, after the question, I was stating what answers there *might* be and was hoping that one of you would offer up your answer rather than assume what I was stating was what I was saying women do feel. Because I do not know the answer. That’s why I asked.
 

Toni

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wow! This is a thread for questions for women. I asked a question for women. I guess I’m not wanted here. Thanks for clearing that up.

A woman answered a question and you critiqued her answer. Maybe not the best way to go here.

I did not critique it. I asked for more clarification. The question was why most bras clasped in the back when it would seem easier to clasp in front. The answer was that she puts it on backwards, clasps in the front, and turns it around. But the question was not about how a woman does it but why it’s designed that way so I asked if it “appears” simpler to have clasps in front then what is it that makes it more common to clasp in back. I guess you interpreted my post differently than that. Perhaps it is simply difficult to get the proper tone in a post like this but I had no expectation that what I wrote would be considered “mansplaining” since I offered no explanation just further questioning.

You are right that tone can be difficult to convey and difficult to discern on the internet.

The first sentence Of your post sounded more like criticism than inquiry to me.
 

WAB

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wow! This is a thread for questions for women. I asked a question for women. I guess I’m not wanted here. Thanks for clearing that up.

A woman answered a question and you critiqued her answer. Maybe not the best way to go here.

I did not critique it. I asked for more clarification. The question was why most bras clasped in the back when it would seem easier to clasp in front. The answer was that she puts it on backwards, clasps in the front, and turns it around. But the question was not about how a woman does it but why it’s designed that way so I asked if it “appears” simpler to have clasps in front then what is it that makes it more common to clasp in back. I guess you interpreted my post differently than that. Perhaps it is simply difficult to get the proper tone in a post like this but I had no expectation that what I wrote would be considered “mansplaining” since I offered no explanation just further questioning.

ETA: I went back to my post to read it again. I think you maybe reacted to the last part. In that part, after the question, I was stating what answers there *might* be and was hoping that one of you would offer up your answer rather than assume what I was stating was what I was saying women do feel. Because I do not know the answer. That’s why I asked.

Yeah you got kind of a raw deal there, Shadowy Man.

I think the world is in a bad state of communication breakdown.
 

Shadowy Man

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I did not critique it. I asked for more clarification. The question was why most bras clasped in the back when it would seem easier to clasp in front. The answer was that she puts it on backwards, clasps in the front, and turns it around. But the question was not about how a woman does it but why it’s designed that way so I asked if it “appears” simpler to have clasps in front then what is it that makes it more common to clasp in back. I guess you interpreted my post differently than that. Perhaps it is simply difficult to get the proper tone in a post like this but I had no expectation that what I wrote would be considered “mansplaining” since I offered no explanation just further questioning.

You are right that tone can be difficult to convey and difficult to discern on the internet.

The first sentence Of your post sounded more like criticism than inquiry to me.

I agree it could be read that way. I tried to express my thought with the words “sounds like”. The tone should have come across quizzically rather than critically.
 

Toni

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I did not critique it. I asked for more clarification. The question was why most bras clasped in the back when it would seem easier to clasp in front. The answer was that she puts it on backwards, clasps in the front, and turns it around. But the question was not about how a woman does it but why it’s designed that way so I asked if it “appears” simpler to have clasps in front then what is it that makes it more common to clasp in back. I guess you interpreted my post differently than that. Perhaps it is simply difficult to get the proper tone in a post like this but I had no expectation that what I wrote would be considered “mansplaining” since I offered no explanation just further questioning.

You are right that tone can be difficult to convey and difficult to discern on the internet.

The first sentence Of your post sounded more like criticism than inquiry to me.

I agree it could be read that way. I tried to express my thought with the words “sounds like”. The tone should have come across quizzically rather than critically.

Or: you could have expressed sympathy with the fact that women in the US and much of the rest of the world are expected to wear an undergarment that requires some maneuvering to put on.

Or simply said: I did not know that.

I mean, personally, jock straps always confused me. And cups. I mean, how did they not hurt? For that matter, as a child I was quite confused how boys managed to run or climb trees or do anything at all with a penis dangling between their legs. Aside from the convenience of being able to pee on a tree or fire hydrant instead of running inside to the bathroom, a penis seemed quite uncomfortable a thing to have. But these were not questions that girls were supposed to ask back in the days of jock straps and cups....

So, whatever my husband tells me about them, I simply take as gospel, without question. He has assured me, several times, that underwear is sufficient to control the bobbing about of boy parts when they run and play.
 

bigfield

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Why do some men wear boxer shorts, while other wear bikini style underwear?

When I was a boy I wore bikini-style briefs because that's what my dad wore, and that's what my mum bought. When satin boxer shorts became popular (around about the same time it became popular for suburban Australian boys to wear their pants extremely low) I started wearing those instead. I found boxer shorts extremely comfortable, but they lead to some complications later on. During my teens I transferred to a private school that mandated a strict school uniform, including wool trousers. Unlike the loose pants I was permitted in public school, these pants had a relatively high crotch, and I tended to have conspicuous bulge down one leg that would vary in size depending on the weather. On top of that, teenage boys are prone to frequent erections, which can be extremely difficult to conceal without any support down there. I would often resort to walking around with my hands in my pockets, boner in hand to stop it dropping down my pants leg, or I would tuck it into my belt. A few years later I switched to trunks, which actually hold one's doodle in place (even during a sudden stiffy) without being as uncomfortable as briefs.

Basically boxer shorts are nice and comfy, but they aren't a one-size-fits-all solution.

I mean, personally, jock straps always confused me.

Same.

And cups. I mean, how did they not hurt?

They are uncomfortable. When I used to do martial arts I would wear one every training session, even when it wasn't needed, just so I could get used to it. They never really fit properly, either.

For that matter, as a child I was quite confused how boys managed to run or climb trees or do anything at all with a penis dangling between their legs.

So, whatever my husband tells me about them, I simply take as gospel, without question. He has assured me, several times, that underwear is sufficient to control the bobbing about of boy parts when they run and play.

Well, not boxer shorts. Those aren't good for anything except catching a couple of drops of wee.
 

Toni

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When I was a boy I wore bikini-style briefs because that's what my dad wore, and that's what my mum bought. When satin boxer shorts became popular (around about the same time it became popular for suburban Australian boys to wear their pants extremely low) I started wearing those instead. I found boxer shorts extremely comfortable, but they lead to some complications later on. During my teens I transferred to a private school that mandated a strict school uniform, including wool trousers. Unlike the loose pants I was permitted in public school, these pants had a relatively high crotch, and I tended to have conspicuous bulge down one leg that would vary in size depending on the weather. On top of that, teenage boys are prone to frequent erections, which can be extremely difficult to conceal without any support down there. I would often resort to walking around with my hands in my pockets, boner in hand to stop it dropping down my pants leg, or I would tuck it into my belt. A few years later I switched to trunks, which actually hold one's doodle in place (even during a sudden stiffy) without being as uncomfortable as briefs.

Basically boxer shorts are nice and comfy, but they aren't a one-size-fits-all solution.



Same.

And cups. I mean, how did they not hurt?

They are uncomfortable. When I used to do martial arts I would wear one every training session, even when it wasn't needed, just so I could get used to it. They never really fit properly, either.

For that matter, as a child I was quite confused how boys managed to run or climb trees or do anything at all with a penis dangling between their legs.

So, whatever my husband tells me about them, I simply take as gospel, without question. He has assured me, several times, that underwear is sufficient to control the bobbing about of boy parts when they run and play.

Well, not boxer shorts. Those aren't good for anything except catching a couple of drops of wee.

NM, I am not fully awake yet and you answered what I was going to ask. My husband has told me about the trials and tribulations of being in class with attractive girls and teachers and hiding a spontaneous erection.
 

southernhybrid

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wow! This is a thread for questions for women. I asked a question for women. I guess I’m not wanted here. Thanks for clearing that up.

A woman answered a question and you critiqued her answer. Maybe not the best way to go here.

I did not critique it. I asked for more clarification. The question was why most bras clasped in the back when it would seem easier to clasp in front. The answer was that she puts it on backwards, clasps in the front, and turns it around. But the question was not about how a woman does it but why it’s designed that way so I asked if it “appears” simpler to have clasps in front then what is it that makes it more common to clasp in back. I guess you interpreted my post differently than that. Perhaps it is simply difficult to get the proper tone in a post like this but I had no expectation that what I wrote would be considered “mansplaining” since I offered no explanation just further questioning.

ETA: I went back to my post to read it again. I think you maybe reacted to the last part. In that part, after the question, I was stating what answers there *might* be and was hoping that one of you would offer up your answer rather than assume what I was stating was what I was saying women do feel. Because I do not know the answer. That’s why I asked.

I thought my explanation was quite clear. For those of us who have worn bras with clasps in the back, I told you exactly how easy it is to put them on. There is nothing more to clarify. I assume they were designed that way because they are very easy to put on and take off in the way that I explained. Of course not all women are the same. Some might like the bras that clasp in the front, and some might even like wearing the dreadful bras that have underwire cups. We aren't all built the same way and what may work for one, may not work well for someone else.

There are many different styles of underpants for both men and women. I guess that most people wear the style that works best for their figures.
 

Jimmy Higgins

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What few men and not enough women understand about bras is that the primary support comes from the band that goes around the body. It most frequently clasps in back because that part of a woman’s body tends to be flatter, allowing fir a broader band which typically is a bit more contoured in the front, to fit around the front, more bowed portion of the rib cage.

I’ve tried front clasp bras and don’t find them as comfortable. This was true even when I was quite thin and required less support—in fact, wore bras for modesty only.

There are many different styles and sizes of bras because they need to fit as well
as possible in order to provide needed support and to be comfortable. An uncomfortable bra can dig into shoulders and ribcages, can ride up so that the band digs into the breast. Women with larger breasts especially need well fitting, well made bras that provide sufficient support to avoid debilitating back aches.

It’s not the same as buying a three pack of Hanes t’shirts. Unfortunately.

As a male I have a hard time picturing a good front clasp design. Typically the bra cups basically touch in front--where are you going to put the clasp??

Between the cups. It’s not the same type of hooks as on a back clasping bra so it works but not great. I thought it would be a great convenience but it really wasn’t—except while I was breast feeding. That would not have worked very well if I had been larger busted and needed the extra support more than I did. Truthfully, fro t clasps, which are typically plastic, just don’t last as long and are not adjustable. Most bras have two or three sets of hooks in the band that allow you to tighten the fir as the elastic gives, allowing the bra to last longer. Also: bras do not belong in a dryer—too hard on the ekastic. A good bra is not inexpensive but worth the cost. You just have to take care of it.
We are probably just 20 years away from superconductor bras, lift without the wire.

Here is a question, are women against wearing loose pants because they think tight pants are comfortable?
 

Toni

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Between the cups. It’s not the same type of hooks as on a back clasping bra so it works but not great. I thought it would be a great convenience but it really wasn’t—except while I was breast feeding. That would not have worked very well if I had been larger busted and needed the extra support more than I did. Truthfully, fro t clasps, which are typically plastic, just don’t last as long and are not adjustable. Most bras have two or three sets of hooks in the band that allow you to tighten the fir as the elastic gives, allowing the bra to last longer. Also: bras do not belong in a dryer—too hard on the ekastic. A good bra is not inexpensive but worth the cost. You just have to take care of it.
We are probably just 20 years away from superconductor bras, lift without the wire.

Here is a question, are women against wearing loose pants because they think tight pants are comfortable?

It's tough, unless you are under 20 and 5'10+, weighing under 120 lbs. Too loose and you look shorter and dumpier and no one wants that. Too tight and you look like you bought your pants 20 lbs (or more) ago and nobody wants that. It can be really, really, really tough to find a pair of jeans or pants that does what it's supposed to do: make you look taller, thinner, hipper, younger, and smarter AND have convenient and sufficiently deep pockets that don't make your hips or your ass look huge. There are about 70 bajillion different makers/styles/sizes of jeans and pants, no two of which will consistently even semi-fit you. Even--get this: if you go to the same store on the same day and in the same department store dressing room, try on 3 different pairs of the same style (verified by tag) and same size (again, verified by tag) of stupid boring pants that you can wear to work and meet the 'business casual' dress code while staying within the 'don't pay too much because you're only going to destroy them when something heinous spills or splashes on them in the lab price/quality point.

Do not even get me started on jeans. I will say that I exercise extreme brand loyalty when it comes to jeans.

Women are wearing a LOT of leggings these days during the pandemic. Not because anyone deludes themselves that they look good or will last more than a dozen washings but because Zoom usually only shows you from the waist up if you are even a little clever and you can bend over to pick stuff up in them.
 

southernhybrid

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Between the cups. It’s not the same type of hooks as on a back clasping bra so it works but not great. I thought it would be a great convenience but it really wasn’t—except while I was breast feeding. That would not have worked very well if I had been larger busted and needed the extra support more than I did. Truthfully, fro t clasps, which are typically plastic, just don’t last as long and are not adjustable. Most bras have two or three sets of hooks in the band that allow you to tighten the fir as the elastic gives, allowing the bra to last longer. Also: bras do not belong in a dryer—too hard on the ekastic. A good bra is not inexpensive but worth the cost. You just have to take care of it.
We are probably just 20 years away from superconductor bras, lift without the wire.

Here is a question, are women against wearing loose pants because they think tight pants are comfortable?

Tight jeans are very comfortable on me because I have arthritis in my knees and the tight jeans are almost like wearing a compression sleeve on my knees.

I have a nice shape because I exercise everyday, which also helps my arthritis as well as my figure. I was a bit overweight in my 30s and 40s, but then started exercising at age 50. To me, obesity wasn't an option. So, I guess you could call me a bit vain because I like showing that exercise and discipline can help an older woman have a youthful figure, if she works at it. Of course, we are all born with a certain body type, but it still helps to exercise regardless of your natural shape. Exercise has numerous health benefits, outside of looking good in skinny jeans. :)

I understand that many people struggle to maintain a healthy weight. I realize it's difficult and not everyone has my discipline or my shape. I inherited a small frame from my mother. I also inherited osteoarthritis from her. But, aerobic exercise does increase one's metabolism so I highly recommend it for anyone who wants to lose weight or just establish a healthy habit. I never mention anyone else's weight issues, unless I am asked for advice.

I agree with Toni, assuming she was thinking of how women's clothing is sized. There is no consistency in women's sizes, and what was once a size 6 is now a size 2. What was once a size 14 is now a size 10, at least in some brands. It's crazy. When I order online, I always look closely at measurements since sizes are very inconsistent. Men don't usually have to deal with that, at least not to the extend that we women do.
 

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It's tough, unless you are under 20 and 5'10+, weighing under 120 lbs. Too loose and you look shorter and dumpier and no one wants that. Too tight and you look like you bought your pants 20 lbs (or more) ago and nobody wants that. It can be really, really, really tough to find a pair of jeans or pants that does what it's supposed to do: make you look taller, thinner, hipper, younger, and smarter AND have convenient and sufficiently deep pockets that don't make your hips or your ass look huge. There are about 70 bajillion different makers/styles/sizes of jeans and pants, no two of which will consistently even semi-fit you. Even--get this: if you go to the same store on the same day and in the same department store dressing room, try on 3 different pairs of the same style (verified by tag) and same size (again, verified by tag) of stupid boring pants that you can wear to work and meet the 'business casual' dress code while staying within the 'don't pay too much because you're only going to destroy them when something heinous spills or splashes on them in the lab price/quality point.

Do not even get me started on jeans. I will say that I exercise extreme brand loyalty when it comes to jeans.

I'm surprised. I've seen that sort of size variability with no-name clothes (as a teenager I once bought a 30 and a 34 on the same day), but I exclusively buy Levi's jeans these days--and I can absolutely trust the fit from pair to pair. Likewise, my hiking stuff is completely consistent. (Admittedly, that's not el-cheapo stuff. You can't count on el-cheapo stuff, if I can't count on it it might as well not be there. Thus the only el-cheapo stuff I hike with trash bags and some bags to contain mess.)
 

Loren Pechtel

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Tight jeans are very comfortable on me because I have arthritis in my knees and the tight jeans are almost like wearing a compression sleeve on my knees.

Huh?!

These days I hike with compression sleeves on my knees, but they're only good when standing. I don't wear them in the car.
 

Toni

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It's tough, unless you are under 20 and 5'10+, weighing under 120 lbs. Too loose and you look shorter and dumpier and no one wants that. Too tight and you look like you bought your pants 20 lbs (or more) ago and nobody wants that. It can be really, really, really tough to find a pair of jeans or pants that does what it's supposed to do: make you look taller, thinner, hipper, younger, and smarter AND have convenient and sufficiently deep pockets that don't make your hips or your ass look huge. There are about 70 bajillion different makers/styles/sizes of jeans and pants, no two of which will consistently even semi-fit you. Even--get this: if you go to the same store on the same day and in the same department store dressing room, try on 3 different pairs of the same style (verified by tag) and same size (again, verified by tag) of stupid boring pants that you can wear to work and meet the 'business casual' dress code while staying within the 'don't pay too much because you're only going to destroy them when something heinous spills or splashes on them in the lab price/quality point.

Do not even get me started on jeans. I will say that I exercise extreme brand loyalty when it comes to jeans.

I'm surprised. I've seen that sort of size variability with no-name clothes (as a teenager I once bought a 30 and a 34 on the same day), but I exclusively buy Levi's jeans these days--and I can absolutely trust the fit from pair to pair. Likewise, my hiking stuff is completely consistent. (Admittedly, that's not el-cheapo stuff. You can't count on el-cheapo stuff, if I can't count on it it might as well not be there. Thus the only el-cheapo stuff I hike with trash bags and some bags to contain mess.)

I was surprised as well, given that I looked very carefully at the labels which gave a style name and number and made sure they matched. They weren't cheapo but not high end, either. It was actually Dockers. They needed to look nice enough to pass for business casual and yet be inexpensive enough that when something bad got spilt or splashed, I wasn't gnashing my teeth. Dockers on sale did the trick for me, when I could find them in petite sizes. Not an easy thing to do.

Size variability seems to be a much bigger issue with women's clothing in general compared with men's. In men's pants, for instance, you get to choose by waist and inseam. For (button up) shirts, you get to choose by neck sizes and sleeve length plus, depending on maker, a choice between slim fitted, 'classic' and I forget what the one for those gentlemen with a little more girth but not yet ready for Big & Tall are called.

Women have to be prepared to do our own hemming. Worse, I have had to explain over and over to a few women why I can't just wear regular sizes. I'm no longer petite in terms of girth but I haven't grown any taller. A regular sized blouse, for instance, is just too darn long between the top of the shoulder and the bust. It never fits right. I have no problem with casual tshirts for yard work or hiking or whatever but if I need to look even a little put together, I need to seek out stores which carry petite sizes.

Unfortunately for me, my metabolism took a nosedive some years ago and I haven't been able to drop pounds I've picked up. Before, I ate like a horse and weighed....under 100 soaking wet. Now, I am much more moderate in my eating habits but alas, although I swore I would never gain weight like a lot of my family members, it was a promise I could not keep.
 

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Here's a question for women that I hope doesn't devolve into a stand-off.

To my mind, a front-clasp bra would be easier for a woman to put on and off, but they seem to be the exception rather than the rule. Am I wrong about that, or is there some other reason that most bras are rear-clasp?

This has nothing to do about access for a significant other--just everyday wear.

Front clasps are great if a) you're young and your boobs are fully of springy tension and are perky or b) your boobs are small.

Front clasps aren't very strong, and they have a tendency to break, come undone, or dig in to your chest. Back clasps are stronger, and can provide better overall support.
 

Emily Lake

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I agree it could be read that way. I tried to express my thought with the words “sounds like”. The tone should have come across quizzically rather than critically.

Or: you could have expressed sympathy with the fact that women in the US and much of the rest of the world are expected to wear an undergarment that requires some maneuvering to put on.

Or simply said: I did not know that.

I mean, personally, jock straps always confused me. And cups. I mean, how did they not hurt? For that matter, as a child I was quite confused how boys managed to run or climb trees or do anything at all with a penis dangling between their legs. Aside from the convenience of being able to pee on a tree or fire hydrant instead of running inside to the bathroom, a penis seemed quite uncomfortable a thing to have. But these were not questions that girls were supposed to ask back in the days of jock straps and cups....

So, whatever my husband tells me about them, I simply take as gospel, without question. He has assured me, several times, that underwear is sufficient to control the bobbing about of boy parts when they run and play.

I had those same queries as a child. They were alleviated when I was old enough to begin interacting with penises, and realize they were positioned much further up on the body than our vulvas are. They aren't between the legs, so much as sticking out front!

That said... as we've become older, my husband has discovered the disadvantages of saggy balls. Like sometimes trying to shift position in a chair and managing to sit on his own testicles :(
 

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Between the cups. It’s not the same type of hooks as on a back clasping bra so it works but not great. I thought it would be a great convenience but it really wasn’t—except while I was breast feeding. That would not have worked very well if I had been larger busted and needed the extra support more than I did. Truthfully, fro t clasps, which are typically plastic, just don’t last as long and are not adjustable. Most bras have two or three sets of hooks in the band that allow you to tighten the fir as the elastic gives, allowing the bra to last longer. Also: bras do not belong in a dryer—too hard on the ekastic. A good bra is not inexpensive but worth the cost. You just have to take care of it.
We are probably just 20 years away from superconductor bras, lift without the wire.

Here is a question, are women against wearing loose pants because they think tight pants are comfortable?

Can't speak for other women... I wear tailored and fitted pants because if they're too lose, my ass eats them.
 

James Brown

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Here's a question for women that I hope doesn't devolve into a stand-off.

To my mind, a front-clasp bra would be easier for a woman to put on and off, but they seem to be the exception rather than the rule. Am I wrong about that, or is there some other reason that most bras are rear-clasp?

This has nothing to do about access for a significant other--just everyday wear.

Front clasps are great if a) you're young and your boobs are fully of springy tension and are perky or b) your boobs are small.

Front clasps aren't very strong, and they have a tendency to break, come undone, or dig in to your chest. Back clasps are stronger, and can provide better overall support.

Thanks for answering my question, That makes perfect sense.
 

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Tight jeans are very comfortable on me because I have arthritis in my knees and the tight jeans are almost like wearing a compression sleeve on my knees.

Huh?!

These days I hike with compression sleeves on my knees, but they're only good when standing. I don't wear them in the car.

Well, I'm obviously not you. I wore compression sleeves on my knees under loser jeans during the last two years that I worked. My jeans aren't quite as comfortable as compression sleeves but they are close enough to be comfortable for me. What works for one, doesn't necessarily work for everyone. Duh......
 

southernhybrid

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It's tough, unless you are under 20 and 5'10+, weighing under 120 lbs. Too loose and you look shorter and dumpier and no one wants that. Too tight and you look like you bought your pants 20 lbs (or more) ago and nobody wants that. It can be really, really, really tough to find a pair of jeans or pants that does what it's supposed to do: make you look taller, thinner, hipper, younger, and smarter AND have convenient and sufficiently deep pockets that don't make your hips or your ass look huge. There are about 70 bajillion different makers/styles/sizes of jeans and pants, no two of which will consistently even semi-fit you. Even--get this: if you go to the same store on the same day and in the same department store dressing room, try on 3 different pairs of the same style (verified by tag) and same size (again, verified by tag) of stupid boring pants that you can wear to work and meet the 'business casual' dress code while staying within the 'don't pay too much because you're only going to destroy them when something heinous spills or splashes on them in the lab price/quality point.

Do not even get me started on jeans. I will say that I exercise extreme brand loyalty when it comes to jeans.

I'm surprised. I've seen that sort of size variability with no-name clothes (as a teenager I once bought a 30 and a 34 on the same day), but I exclusively buy Levi's jeans these days--and I can absolutely trust the fit from pair to pair. Likewise, my hiking stuff is completely consistent. (Admittedly, that's not el-cheapo stuff. You can't count on el-cheapo stuff, if I can't count on it it might as well not be there. Thus the only el-cheapo stuff I hike with trash bags and some bags to contain mess.)

You're talking about men's sizing. Women's sizing is not consistent. I currently wear mostly Levi's. But, even Levi's vary from style to style, which I why I always check the measurements very closely if I'm ordering a pair online.
 

Emily Lake

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It's tough, unless you are under 20 and 5'10+, weighing under 120 lbs. Too loose and you look shorter and dumpier and no one wants that. Too tight and you look like you bought your pants 20 lbs (or more) ago and nobody wants that. It can be really, really, really tough to find a pair of jeans or pants that does what it's supposed to do: make you look taller, thinner, hipper, younger, and smarter AND have convenient and sufficiently deep pockets that don't make your hips or your ass look huge. There are about 70 bajillion different makers/styles/sizes of jeans and pants, no two of which will consistently even semi-fit you. Even--get this: if you go to the same store on the same day and in the same department store dressing room, try on 3 different pairs of the same style (verified by tag) and same size (again, verified by tag) of stupid boring pants that you can wear to work and meet the 'business casual' dress code while staying within the 'don't pay too much because you're only going to destroy them when something heinous spills or splashes on them in the lab price/quality point.

Do not even get me started on jeans. I will say that I exercise extreme brand loyalty when it comes to jeans.

I'm surprised. I've seen that sort of size variability with no-name clothes (as a teenager I once bought a 30 and a 34 on the same day), but I exclusively buy Levi's jeans these days--and I can absolutely trust the fit from pair to pair. Likewise, my hiking stuff is completely consistent. (Admittedly, that's not el-cheapo stuff. You can't count on el-cheapo stuff, if I can't count on it it might as well not be there. Thus the only el-cheapo stuff I hike with trash bags and some bags to contain mess.)

You're talking about men's sizing. Women's sizing is not consistent. I currently wear mostly Levi's. But, even Levi's vary from style to style, which I why I always check the measurements very closely if I'm ordering a pair online.

Men tend to underestimate the impact that body shape has on clothing for women. Men simply don't have as much variation in shape as we do. It tends to be a pretty straight-forward height/weight measure for most clothes. So while sizing can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer (there isn't a fixed standard, after all), within a given brand, knowing your size is pretty much all you need.

Women have variations in height and weight as well... but we also have variations in bust size and the ratio of hip to waist, as well as the length from belly button to crotch. Within the same brand, I'll wear dramatically different sizes depending on the cut. A "curvy" fit I usually take a smaller size, because they're shaped to accommodate my outsized derrière, but a slim cut takes a larger size because my thighs are thick (they were even when I was young and thin). With slim cuts, I can wear low or mid rise cuts, but not standard or high rise cuts, because the latter gape around my waist, which is still fairly narrow.

Even bras are far more complicated for fitting than most men realize. The standard band length + cup size is only half the battle, especially if you're no longer a perky teen. The shape of the cups also matters a lot, as does the amount of separation between the cups, and the length/adjustability of the shoulder straps. My mom & I are the same "size", in that we're both 36-Cs. But my breasts are a bit further separated than hers, and hers are lower on her torso than mine. So she needs shoulder straps that adjust to longer lengths, and I usually end up with my shoulder straps cinched up as high as they can go. I can wear demi cups, because my more separated breasts will stay in the cups, where her boobs are closer together and tend to just pop right out. I run into trouble trying to balance a wide enough band to give good support without cutting me in half or riding up, and bras that are cut too high under the arms, and become really uncomfortable after wearing them for a short while.

Buying a bra is a tedious, demoralizing, annoying all-day event. And it usually involves a complete stranger seeing your boobs, and making suggestions.

I would get some schadenfreude-ish giggles out of life if men had to go through as much hassle to find appropriate support for their balls.
 

Loren Pechtel

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I was surprised as well, given that I looked very carefully at the labels which gave a style name and number and made sure they matched. They weren't cheapo but not high end, either. It was actually Dockers. They needed to look nice enough to pass for business casual and yet be inexpensive enough that when something bad got spilt or splashed, I wasn't gnashing my teeth. Dockers on sale did the trick for me, when I could find them in petite sizes. Not an easy thing to do.

!!

Size variability seems to be a much bigger issue with women's clothing in general compared with men's. In men's pants, for instance, you get to choose by waist and inseam.

Look a little more--Levis have a whole variety of style numbers that translate to different cuts. Only the 550s are comfortable for me, the others are too small in the lower thigh region.

Women have to be prepared to do our own hemming. Worse, I have had to explain over and over to a few women why I can't just wear regular sizes. I'm no longer petite in terms of girth but I haven't grown any taller. A regular sized blouse, for instance, is just too darn long between the top of the shoulder and the bust. It never fits right. I have no problem with casual tshirts for yard work or hiking or whatever but if I need to look even a little put together, I need to seek out stores which carry petite sizes.

My wife is lucky in that regard--it's been a long time since she needed to wear anything above casual. She almost always goes to big girl clothes rather than petite women clothes.

Unfortunately for me, my metabolism took a nosedive some years ago and I haven't been able to drop pounds I've picked up. Before, I ate like a horse and weighed....under 100 soaking wet. Now, I am much more moderate in my eating habits but alas, although I swore I would never gain weight like a lot of my family members, it was a promise I could not keep.

Are you my sister-in-law?? My wife used to eat like a horse (my favorite illustration was maybe 25 years ago, buffet line. One person ended up between us, he saw her plate and commented to me that she must have a hollow leg--and my reply: yes, and that will fill up one of them. I knew she would get three plates, although the last wouldn't have as much on it) and her young adult weight was under 90 pounds. She has one sister that's about her size, the other two have been in the overweight category as long as I've known them.
 

Shadowy Man

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In men’s pants there are different cuts too. There slim fit, regular, relaxed, loose. And we do need to find the right fit. I happen to have a narrow waist compared to my hips and muscular thighs so I can’t go to the store and just pick up a 30x30 W/L and expect them to fit. Even the fit of the so-called “style” will depend on brand.
 

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Tight jeans are very comfortable on me because I have arthritis in my knees and the tight jeans are almost like wearing a compression sleeve on my knees.

Huh?!

These days I hike with compression sleeves on my knees, but they're only good when standing. I don't wear them in the car.

Well, I'm obviously not you. I wore compression sleeves on my knees under loser jeans during the last two years that I worked. My jeans aren't quite as comfortable as compression sleeves but they are close enough to be comfortable for me. What works for one, doesn't necessarily work for everyone. Duh......

I'm just amazed you find them comfortable to wear while sitting. They bunch up behind the knee and grow uncomfortable over time.
 

Loren Pechtel

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You're talking about men's sizing. Women's sizing is not consistent. I currently wear mostly Levi's. But, even Levi's vary from style to style, which I why I always check the measurements very closely if I'm ordering a pair online.

She was talking about supposedly matched items. That's why it shocked me.
 

Toni

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You're talking about men's sizing. Women's sizing is not consistent. I currently wear mostly Levi's. But, even Levi's vary from style to style, which I why I always check the measurements very closely if I'm ordering a pair online.

She was talking about supposedly matched items. That's why it shocked me.

It really shocked me, too. I think there isn’t the same level of quality control as there used to be, and it varies by manufacturer. I have a couple of brands that I am immensely loyal to because I can count on certain sizes and styles fitting.
 

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You're talking about men's sizing. Women's sizing is not consistent. I currently wear mostly Levi's. But, even Levi's vary from style to style, which I why I always check the measurements very closely if I'm ordering a pair online.

She was talking about supposedly matched items. That's why it shocked me.

It really shocked me, too. I think there isn’t the same level of quality control as there used to be, and it varies by manufacturer. I have a couple of brands that I am immensely loyal to because I can count on certain sizes and styles fitting.

I have 3 pairs of the exact same Levi's. They are all the same size and they are slightly different in the way that they fit. My husband used to be a manufacturing engineer. His original background was in clothing. I think I remember him telling me that size differences are often due to where the clothing is manufactured. One company he worked for had operations in Costa Rica, Mexico and China. I guess each plant might size a little bit differently.

Since Loren and I were disagreeing about compression sleeves, let me add, that mine never fold over or slip down. I wear some that are made of bamboo. Some of mine are about five years old and are just starting to become a bit stretched out. They are quite comfortable and protective enough to help my pain. My knees are bone on bone. I refuse knee replacement surgery, but I am finally going to have gel injections next month as several other older women I know, have claimed that they work well for pain. They usually last about 6 months. Medicare covers the cost. Just adding that in case anyone else here is having knee issues and doesn't want surgery.

Please don't take this as criticism or bragging. But, I found that aerobic exercise has increased my metabolism so much that I now worry more about losing too much weight, instead of gaining too much weight. I used to think it was bunk when I was told that your metabolism stays higher several hours after you finish your workout, but I think it may be true.

During the pandemic, I increased my workouts from 3 days a week to 7 days a week. I lost ten pounds and I eat more now than I did before I increased the workouts. I just use Leslie Sansone's DVDs. She's a bit annoying but the workouts are easy to follow and they work. They were using them at our senior center, but when it shut down due to the pandemic, I started using some that I had ordered from Amazon or had previously bought in a store. Even with bad knees, I can do them, as long as I take an analgesic about an hour prior to beginning.

Working out has all but eliminated by neck and back pain. As long as I wear compression sleeves on my knees, I can tolerate the pain. I don't mean to sound like an exercise evangelist, but I've read several articles that give evidence that exercise is more important that what you weigh. So, for Toni or anyone else who is concerned about gaining weight or just needs to be more active, please consider aerobic workouts. I'd do fast walking but my feet are also arthritic and bending them while walking is too painful. Walking in place and doing dance steps is very tolerable. Forgive me for preaching about exercise. I just want everyone to be healthier. We were made to move! :D

Men usually don't like Leslie's workouts. Whenever a man would join our group, he would rarely stay around very long. My husband joined us for about a year, but now he takes a 2 mile walk every morning with one of our dogs. I started out that way when I was about 50, but once the foot arthritis set in, I had to do something else. I miss walking around the neighborhood, but one must do whatever works best.
 

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Look a little more--Levis have a whole variety of style numbers that translate to different cuts. Only the 550s are comfortable for me, the others are too small in the lower thigh region.

Women have to be prepared to do our own hemming. Worse, I have had to explain over and over to a few women why I can't just wear regular sizes. I'm no longer petite in terms of girth but I haven't grown any taller. A regular sized blouse, for instance, is just too darn long between the top of the shoulder and the bust. It never fits right. I have no problem with casual tshirts for yard work or hiking or whatever but if I need to look even a little put together, I need to seek out stores which carry petite sizes.

My wife is lucky in that regard--it's been a long time since she needed to wear anything above casual. She almost always goes to big girl clothes rather than petite women clothes.

Unfortunately for me, my metabolism took a nosedive some years ago and I haven't been able to drop pounds I've picked up. Before, I ate like a horse and weighed....under 100 soaking wet. Now, I am much more moderate in my eating habits but alas, although I swore I would never gain weight like a lot of my family members, it was a promise I could not keep.

Are you my sister-in-law?? My wife used to eat like a horse (my favorite illustration was maybe 25 years ago, buffet line. One person ended up between us, he saw her plate and commented to me that she must have a hollow leg--and my reply: yes, and that will fill up one of them. I knew she would get three plates, although the last wouldn't have as much on it) and her young adult weight was under 90 pounds. She has one sister that's about her size, the other two have been in the overweight category as long as I've known them.

Ok I should qualify that: I ate like a teenage girl horse up until my30’s. Nothing at all compared with my husband or sons. But back in the day, I would drop a few pounds if I stayed up too late or skipped a meal. At one point I had to be careful because if I dropped below 93 or 94 lbs, I’d just keep losing weight. I generally stayed at 98-102. If I hit 105, I felt chubby. I’m short and have a slight frame so even a small change in weight was noticeable. Alas! Those days are gone.
 

Emily Lake

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You're talking about men's sizing. Women's sizing is not consistent. I currently wear mostly Levi's. But, even Levi's vary from style to style, which I why I always check the measurements very closely if I'm ordering a pair online.

She was talking about supposedly matched items. That's why it shocked me.

It really shocked me, too. I think there isn’t the same level of quality control as there used to be, and it varies by manufacturer. I have a couple of brands that I am immensely loyal to because I can count on certain sizes and styles fitting.

I've run into that too. It almost always seems to vary by where I buy them. Like, if I buy Levi's at Macys or Nordstrom, they fit differently than if I buy them at Target or Fred Meyer. Even if they've got the same make number and size. It makes me think they're manufactured differently.
 

Toni

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It really shocked me, too. I think there isn’t the same level of quality control as there used to be, and it varies by manufacturer. I have a couple of brands that I am immensely loyal to because I can count on certain sizes and styles fitting.

I've run into that too. It almost always seems to vary by where I buy them. Like, if I buy Levi's at Macys or Nordstrom, they fit differently than if I buy them at Target or Fred Meyer. Even if they've got the same make number and size. It makes me think they're manufactured differently.

Yes, exactly!
 

thebeave

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I agree it could be read that way. I tried to express my thought with the words “sounds like”. The tone should have come across quizzically rather than critically.

Or: you could have expressed sympathy with the fact that women in the US and much of the rest of the world are expected to wear an undergarment that requires some maneuvering to put on.

Or simply said: I did not know that.

I mean, personally, jock straps always confused me. And cups. I mean, how did they not hurt? For that matter, as a child I was quite confused how boys managed to run or climb trees or do anything at all with a penis dangling between their legs. Aside from the convenience of being able to pee on a tree or fire hydrant instead of running inside to the bathroom, a penis seemed quite uncomfortable a thing to have. But these were not questions that girls were supposed to ask back in the days of jock straps and cups....

So, whatever my husband tells me about them, I simply take as gospel, without question. He has assured me, several times, that underwear is sufficient to control the bobbing about of boy parts when they run and play.

It can be, for sure. It's why we have to have our legs apart when we sit down (i.e. "manspreading"). Thankfully, there are feminists who are doing what they can to keep us slouchy guys in line and sitting dignified:

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/women/manspreading-chair-design-laila-laurel-award-brighton-university-a9008746.html
 

Loren Pechtel

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I have 3 pairs of the exact same Levi's. They are all the same size and they are slightly different in the way that they fit. My husband used to be a manufacturing engineer. His original background was in clothing. I think I remember him telling me that size differences are often due to where the clothing is manufactured. One company he worked for had operations in Costa Rica, Mexico and China. I guess each plant might size a little bit differently.

Yeah, there are always differences. Good brands should minimize them, though.

Since Loren and I were disagreeing about compression sleeves, let me add, that mine never fold over or slip down. I wear some that are made of bamboo. Some of mine are about five years old and are just starting to become a bit stretched out. They are quite comfortable and protective enough to help my pain. My knees are bone on bone. I refuse knee replacement surgery, but I am finally going to have gel injections next month as several other older women I know, have claimed that they work well for pain. They usually last about 6 months. Medicare covers the cost. Just adding that in case anyone else here is having knee issues and doesn't want surgery.

I've just got some sort of quirky extension issue--a quick step, especially slightly downhill can leave my knee suddenly in pain for maybe an hour. The compression sleeves I wear make this maybe 30 seconds if that. I have another one that squeezes a bit harder and completely eliminates the issue--but it rubs wrong, I can't stand more than about 5 miles with it. Walking slower on flat ground I have no need of them.

Please don't take this as criticism or bragging. But, I found that aerobic exercise has increased my metabolism so much that I now worry more about losing too much weight, instead of gaining too much weight. I used to think it was bunk when I was told that your metabolism stays higher several hours after you finish your workout, but I think it may be true.

During the pandemic, I increased my workouts from 3 days a week to 7 days a week. I lost ten pounds and I eat more now than I did before I increased the workouts. I just use Leslie Sansone's DVDs. She's a bit annoying but the workouts are easy to follow and they work. They were using them at our senior center, but when it shut down due to the pandemic, I started using some that I had ordered from Amazon or had previously bought in a store. Even with bad knees, I can do them, as long as I take an analgesic about an hour prior to beginning.

No idea on frequent workouts--for me, exercise means hiking. Usually only once a week--but often 10+ miles.

Working out has all but eliminated by neck and back pain. As long as I wear compression sleeves on my knees, I can tolerate the pain. I don't mean to sound like an exercise evangelist, but I've read several articles that give evidence that exercise is more important that what you weigh. So, for Toni or anyone else who is concerned about gaining weight or just needs to be more active, please consider aerobic workouts. I'd do fast walking but my feet are also arthritic and bending them while walking is too painful. Walking in place and doing dance steps is very tolerable. Forgive me for preaching about exercise. I just want everyone to be healthier. We were made to move! :D

Yup, everyone should do something.

Men usually don't like Leslie's workouts. Whenever a man would join our group, he would rarely stay around very long. My husband joined us for about a year, but now he takes a 2 mile walk every morning with one of our dogs. I started out that way when I was about 50, but once the foot arthritis set in, I had to do something else. I miss walking around the neighborhood, but one must do whatever works best.

Walking out in nature is far better than walking around the neighborhood.
 

Loren Pechtel

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Are you my sister-in-law?? My wife used to eat like a horse (my favorite illustration was maybe 25 years ago, buffet line. One person ended up between us, he saw her plate and commented to me that she must have a hollow leg--and my reply: yes, and that will fill up one of them. I knew she would get three plates, although the last wouldn't have as much on it) and her young adult weight was under 90 pounds. She has one sister that's about her size, the other two have been in the overweight category as long as I've known them.

Ok I should qualify that: I ate like a teenage girl horse up until my30’s. Nothing at all compared with my husband or sons. But back in the day, I would drop a few pounds if I stayed up too late or skipped a meal. At one point I had to be careful because if I dropped below 93 or 94 lbs, I’d just keep losing weight. I generally stayed at 98-102. If I hit 105, I felt chubby. I’m short and have a slight frame so even a small change in weight was noticeable. Alas! Those days are gone.

I was just joking because what you describe sounded so much like my wife. My parents didn't believe me when I told them she outate me (even though I'm a bit over 50% bigger than she is.) It didn't take them long to see I was right. From what she tells me as a young adult she ate even more than I've known her to eat--there were never leftovers with her around and she's the eldest of 7. And she was in her 50s in the buffet incident I described upthread.
 

DrZoidberg

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Today my girlfriend was recycling bottles and putting them into the machine. She accidentally put the bottle in the wrong hole.

I said "see, it's not that easy".

I was very proud of that quip
 

Toni

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I agree it could be read that way. I tried to express my thought with the words “sounds like”. The tone should have come across quizzically rather than critically.

Or: you could have expressed sympathy with the fact that women in the US and much of the rest of the world are expected to wear an undergarment that requires some maneuvering to put on.

Or simply said: I did not know that.

I mean, personally, jock straps always confused me. And cups. I mean, how did they not hurt? For that matter, as a child I was quite confused how boys managed to run or climb trees or do anything at all with a penis dangling between their legs. Aside from the convenience of being able to pee on a tree or fire hydrant instead of running inside to the bathroom, a penis seemed quite uncomfortable a thing to have. But these were not questions that girls were supposed to ask back in the days of jock straps and cups....

So, whatever my husband tells me about them, I simply take as gospel, without question. He has assured me, several times, that underwear is sufficient to control the bobbing about of boy parts when they run and play.

It can be, for sure. It's why we have to have our legs apart when we sit down (i.e. "manspreading"). Thankfully, there are feminists who are doing what they can to keep us slouchy guys in line and sitting dignified:

https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/women/manspreading-chair-design-laila-laurel-award-brighton-university-a9008746.html

Just read this and glanced over at my husband who is sitting, reading the newspaper, with his legs.......not spread out to take up the entire sofa. In fact, if he had been wearing baggy shorts, I'm pretty sure I could not have seen his underwear or dangly bits.

Co-workers and I were talking about this one day as we looked around the lab and noted exactly one man sitting so that he was manspreading--something that he habitually did. Not just his legs, but also his arms wide spread, taking up as much room as possible. None of the other men did. He was, indeed, a nasty asshole who was always trying, in various ways, to assert his dominance over all of his coworkers except admin. who had the authority to discipline him. A couple of people knew him outside of work and one or two had known him since they were kids. According to them, that's how he always was.

Interesting bit: As a private 'experiment' the next time we were working alone, I made sure that I also sat with my legs spread really wide. It wasn't immodest: wearing long pants, baggy lab coat, etc. I just made a point of positioning myself so that I took up as much physical space as possible. Didn't change a single other thing about how I did my job or interacted with him. I just made sure that I physically took up as much room as possible.

It was weird: He didn't do that manspreading thing that day. He never did that manspreading thing again with me. Also quit trying to dump extra work on me.

I have no idea why.
 

ZiprHead

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Here's a question for women that I hope doesn't devolve into a stand-off.

To my mind, a front-clasp bra would be easier for a woman to put on and off, but they seem to be the exception rather than the rule. Am I wrong about that, or is there some other reason that most bras are rear-clasp?

This has nothing to do about access for a significant other--just everyday wear.

When a woman wears a bra that clasps in the back, it's really quite simple. She just clasps it in the front, then simply turns the bra around, and pulls the strap over her shoulders.

What I have always thought were repulsive, are those underwire bras, but I won't judge my female peers if that's what they prefer to wear. What works for one woman, doesn't work for all. We should all wear what we find to be the most comfortable, even if that means going braless.

Why do some men wear boxer shorts, while other wear bikini style underwear? There are many styles of underpants for both men and women. Who cares what one chooses to wear? I certainly don't.

This and the words that make no sense thread kinda' go together. The other day the wife was telling me she was getting dressed for work and for some reason she forgot how to put on her bra.
 

Rhea

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Here is a question, are women against wearing loose pants because they think tight pants are comfortable?

It's tough, unless you are under 20 and 5'10+, weighing under 120 lbs. Too loose and you look shorter and dumpier and no one wants that. Too tight and you look like you bought your pants 20 lbs (or more) ago and nobody wants that.


I like loose pants. And I don’t care what people think I look like, honestly.
I used to be VERY skinny and I liked loose pants. Now I am overweight, and I like loose pants.
My professional shopper hates this for me, and always tries to get me to try on the snug pants. “Get one size smaller,” she says, “really.” And the shop-keeper agrees. But I really don’t like that. I like the way men’s pants look. Well, previous style men’s pants. Now they all have the skinny-pant look. Which looks fine on people and I like the way it looks on them, it’s just not what I like for me.


For me it is all about...

It can be really, really, really tough to find a pair of jeans or pants that [...] have convenient and sufficiently deep pockets

Pockets.

LLbean Chinos have great pockets. The fit is not absolutely perfect, but the pockets are. So I buy them.
 

Rhea

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I'm surprised. I've seen that sort of size variability with no-name clothes (as a teenager I once bought a 30 and a 34 on the same day), but I exclusively buy Levi's jeans these days--and I can absolutely trust the fit from pair to pair.

With women’s levis, they change the fit from time to time and it’s a pain. Same length, yes. Same waist, yes. But they went and changed the hips and seat and now everything is wrong.


Or those awful “low-rise” versions they have now.
Not a fan!
 

Rhea

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Women have to be prepared to do our own hemming. Worse, I have had to explain over and over to a few women why I can't just wear regular sizes. I'm no longer petite in terms of girth but I haven't grown any taller.

Well petite is ONLY height. You can buy Plus sized Petite.
I have trouble with arm-lengths, too.



Unfortunately for me, my metabolism took a nosedive some years ago and I haven't been able to drop pounds I've picked up. Before, I ate like a horse and weighed....under 100 soaking wet. Now, I am much more moderate in my eating habits but alas, although I swore I would never gain weight like a lot of my family members, it was a promise I could not keep.

Feel you. Ditto.
 

Rhea

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Here's a question for women that I hope doesn't devolve into a stand-off.

To my mind, a front-clasp bra would be easier for a woman to put on and off, but they seem to be the exception rather than the rule. Am I wrong about that, or is there some other reason that most bras are rear-clasp?

It’s the discomfort of the stiff clasp mechanism on your front side where you bend and move.

All clasp mechanisms are inherently bulkier and more stiff than a strip of elastic. So if you put it on the front, you’ll press against it whenever you bring your arms forward (like driving, lifting, typing) and whenever you bend forward (lifting, gardening, reaching). Whereas if that inch-wide mechanism is lying across your flat back, you won’t ever feel it.

In addition to the stiffness, clasp mechanisms are also inherently less airy, so you have a sweat spot that also itches.

Turning the bra around when putting it on is a miniscule effort compared to shifting, pinching and scratching all day. This is true no matter what the weight or boob size is involved.
 
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